Come on Seabiscuit!

Overview

Master storyteller Ralph Moody tells the thrilling story of a plucky horse who refused to quit, a down-on-his-luck jockey who didn’t let horrendous accidents keep him out of the saddle, and a taciturn trainer who brought out the best in both. During the Great Depression, Seabiscuit captured the hearts of Americans from the streets to the White House, winning more money than any horse at that time and shattering speed records across the country. In this real-life story Moody captures the hoof-pounding excitement ...
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Overview

Master storyteller Ralph Moody tells the thrilling story of a plucky horse who refused to quit, a down-on-his-luck jockey who didn’t let horrendous accidents keep him out of the saddle, and a taciturn trainer who brought out the best in both. During the Great Depression, Seabiscuit captured the hearts of Americans from the streets to the White House, winning more money than any horse at that time and shattering speed records across the country. In this real-life story Moody captures the hoof-pounding excitement of the explosive early races to an unforgettable showdown with the feared Triple Crown winner War Admiral. Moving and inspirational, Come on Seabiscuit! is a reminder of the qualities that make a real American champion. Ralph Moody is best known for his eight Little Britches books, which have delighted generations of readers and are all available in Bison Books editions. Ralph Moody captured the hearts of young readers everywhere with his beloved Little Britches saga. In this Bison Books edition of his 1963 classic, Moody brings to life the story of a knobby-kneed little colt called Seabiscuit, who against all odds became one of the most celebrated racehorses of all time. Although Seabiscuit was the grandson of the legendary Man O' War, he was neither handsome nor graceful. His head was too big, his legs too short, and his gallop was awkward. His owners gave up on Seabiscuit when he was two, raced him too heavily, and tried unsuccessfully to sell him. It took the keen eyes of trainer Tom Smith to recognize the heart, courage, and gallant determination of Seabiscuit, the qualities of a truly great horse. Smith's unfailing patience and astute treatments, the love and skill of jockey Red Pollard, and the continued support of owner Charles Howard forged Seabiscuit into a champion.
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Editorial Reviews

Salt Lake Tribune

"Written in a folksy, easily understood prose, this illustrated predecessor to Laura Hillenbrand's book about the racehorse (the basis for this summer's movie) is a great pre-movie primer for anyone under 18."—Christy Karras, The Salt Lake Tribune

— Christy Karras

Western Horseman
"Horse racing fans will enjoy the paperback reprint of Ralph Moody's classic tale Come on Seabiscuit!, originally published in 1963. Seabiscuit, the plucky Depression-era racehorse, has gained a new generation of fans since the 2003 Universal Pictures' film release by the same name, and his fans should enjoy Moody's small, easy-to-read volume with black-and-white illustrations by Robert Riger."—Western Horseman
slate.msn.com

“One unlikely offshoot of the Seabiscuit phenomenon . . . was a lovely reminder of the way horse-racing writing used to be done: Ralph Moody's Come on Seabiscuit! was recently brought back into print by the University of Nebraska Press. . . . [W]hat is remarkable about the book—and what makes it rewarding even decades after reading it the first time—is the level of detail about the scrawny racehorse. . . . Ultimately, the reason Come on Seabiscuit! and King of the Wind and Black Stallion are so memorable is that they are outstanding children's literature, not just outstanding children's literature about racing. Just as racetrackers never forget the great horses, we never forget the books that left a mark on us. [M]aybe the Seabiscuit effect wouldn't have been possible without books like Come on Seabiscuit!”—Eric Banks, slate.msn.com

— Eric Banks

Laura Hillenbrand
"When I was about seven years old. . . . I found a children's book called Come on Seabiscuit! which was just wonderful! I read it so many times I broke the spine and all the pages fell out. I still have it; it has to be wrapped in rubber bands because the pages will go everywhere. But that book in just vivid prose told the story of the horse."—Laura Hillenbrand, July 29, 2003, interview on Fresh Air with Terry Gross
Salt Lake Tribune - Christy Karras
"Written in a folksy, easily understood prose, this illustrated predecessor to Laura Hillenbrand's book about the racehorse (the basis for this summer's movie) is a great pre-movie primer for anyone under 18."—Christy Karras, The Salt Lake Tribune
slate.msn.com - Eric Banks
“One unlikely offshoot of the Seabiscuit phenomenon . . . was a lovely reminder of the way horse-racing writing used to be done: Ralph Moody's Come on Seabiscuit! was recently brought back into print by the University of Nebraska Press. . . . [W]hat is remarkable about the book—and what makes it rewarding even decades after reading it the first time—is the level of detail about the scrawny racehorse. . . . Ultimately, the reason Come on Seabiscuit! and King of the Wind and Black Stallion are so memorable is that they are outstanding children's literature, not just outstanding children's literature about racing. Just as racetrackers never forget the great horses, we never forget the books that left a mark on us. [M]aybe the Seabiscuit effect wouldn't have been possible without books like Come on Seabiscuit!”—Eric Banks, slate.msn.com
Publishers Weekly
Long before Laura Hillenbrand's Seabiscuit: An American Legend became a bestseller for adults, Moody's book (which is referenced in Hillenbrand's work) introduced the great racehorse to a younger audience. First published in 1963, Moody's title has recently experienced a resurgence, thanks to the more recent title and the feature film it inspired. Noted children's storyteller Weiss confidently takes the reins here, tracing the thoroughbred from his humble, knobby-kneed beginnings, through periods of doubt and scorn as expressed by his early owners to his triumph as one of the biggest-hearted racers in history. Weiss immediately assumes his typical leisurely pacing, drawing listeners in by capturing the flavor of historic details and setting the stage for exciting races, including the ultimate contest against his rival, Triple Crown winner War Admiral. This well-rounded selection is bound to captivate horse fans, sports fans and anyone who enjoys being wowed by a good story. Ages 8-up. (Dec. 2003) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
KLIATT
This story of Seabiscuit, one of the greatest thoroughbred horses ever raced, was first published in 1963 and it has an almost loving tone to it. Just as most of the country was enamored with Seabiscuit, an ugly duckling grandson of the great race horse Man O' War, during the Depression, the author and the reader will feel great affection for the horse, his owners, trainers and jockeys by the end of this book. In spite of great odds and early mistreatment, Seabiscuit was able to beat both track records and purse records during his career. Both he and his favorite jockey suffered injuries and setbacks, yet they each prevailed, startling the public time and time again by racing after everyone thought they were too old and too injured. YAs will love the excitement and the empathy expressed in this story, which is told in language that has held up well for 40 years. Beautiful pencil sketches of the horse and racetrack culture fill the book. This is an inspirational story for those who need to know that one failure does not mean a life of failures and that often critics can be proven wrong. (Editor's note: Some readers may also be interested in the recent best seller, Seabiscuit: An American Legend, by Laura Hillenbrand.) KLIATT Codes: JS—Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2003 (orig. 1963), Univ. of Nebraska Press, 172p. illus.,
— Nola Theiss
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803282872
  • Publisher: UNP - Bison Books
  • Publication date: 3/1/2003
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 172
  • Sales rank: 669,817
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.39 (d)

Meet the Author

Ralph Moody (1898–1982) was a working cowboy from the age of ten, a trick rodeo rider, and a student of good horseflesh. He is the author of Come on Seabiscuit! as well as the Little Britches series about a boy's life on a Colorado ranch, all available in Bison Books editions.
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2003

    AWESOME!

    This was a great book! It's great for people who love horses and people who need to keep trying. Everyone should read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2003

    The rest of the story

    I loved this book as a kid. Still do. If you read/watched the 'movie version' Seabiscuit, read this too. The background that isn't all in the newer book will make your heart bleed. (Partly from the Howard's scrapbooks.)For anyone who's ever been grossly underappreciated and misunderstood.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2003

    I think that this is a great book!

    I think that this is an awsome book. I just finished reading it two weeks ago and I still think about the book! I think that Seabiscut was a great horse. He shouled have his own statue!

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

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