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Comets, Stars, the Moon, and Mars: Space Poems and Paintings
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Comets, Stars, the Moon, and Mars: Space Poems and Paintings

3.0 1
by Douglas Florian
 

Blast off with Douglas Florian's new high-flying compendium, which features twenty whimsical poems about space.
    
From the moon to the stars, from the Earth to Mars, here is an exuberant celebration of our celestial surroundings that's certain to become a universal favorite among aspiring astronomers everywhere.
 

Overview

Blast off with Douglas Florian's new high-flying compendium, which features twenty whimsical poems about space.
    
From the moon to the stars, from the Earth to Mars, here is an exuberant celebration of our celestial surroundings that's certain to become a universal favorite among aspiring astronomers everywhere.
    
Includes die-cut pages and a glossary of space terms.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review
“The poet-painter’s latest book brings warm wit to the outermost reaches of cold, dark space. . . . Florian’s illustrations depict the marvels of space with luminous texture and detail.”
—The New York Times Book Review
School Library Journal

Gr 1-5
Nothing gladdens the heart of believers in good poetry for children more than a new collection by Florian, whose verses and paintings consistently capture the essence of his featured themes. This one literally sings the music of the spheres. Twenty playfully lyrical poems treat topics such as the universe, the individual planets, constellations, and black holes. Each selection is presented on its own spread and adorned with a magical painting done in gouache, collage, and rubber stamps on brown paper. Circles abound in the artwork, and many pages have round cut-outs that lead into the next picture. For example, "the earth" ("Two-thirds water./One-third land./Valleys deep./Mountains grand") is illustrated with a colorful globe decorated with circled collage prints of animals and plants. A smaller orb appears nearby, made from a cut-out circle that reveals part of the illustration for the next selection, "the moon." Some of the paintings incorporate mythological names and images. The pleasing blend of faded shades and brilliant colors, of old-fashioned prints and fanciful sketches, makes the illustrations seem both antique and high-tech. An appended "Galactic Glossary" provides additional information. In both language and artwork, Florian strikes the perfect balance between grandeur and whimsy. Like Myra Cohn Livingston and Leonard Everett Fisher's Space Songs (Holiday House, 1988; o.p.), this book is a work of art worthy of the vastness of its subject.
—Kathleen WhalinCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Stunning mixed-media illustrations accompany a series of poems that celebrate the wonder and mystery of space. From the universe, the sequence narrows its focus to the galaxy, the solar system and then each body in turn, from the sun to poor demoted Pluto, and beyond. The verse is characteristically playful, wrapping itself around astronomical facts with ease. Readers will learn about the temperature and size of the sun, our moon's phases and Voyager 2's discovery of Neptune's rings. Delightful as the poems are, however, it's this volume's illustrations that surpass. Bright gouache on brown paper bags lend texture to each spread; stamped words allow the illustrations to incorporate such details as names of moons and "sun" in several different languages; collage elements add further whimsy to the whole. To top off this feast for the eyes, occasional die-cuts provide telescopic windows onto adjoining spreads, firmly establishing for the reader the truth that space is a vast continuum, with new surprises in every corner of the sky. Each poem receives a thumbnail gloss at the end, offering additional facts or extending the information presented earlier. Glorious. (Picture book/poetry. 7-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152053727
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/01/2007
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
56
Sales rank:
187,353
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

What People are Saying About This

School Library Journal
* “Nothing gladdens the heart of believers of good poetry for children more than a new collection by Florian. . . . This one literally sings the music of the spheres. . . . In both language and artwork, Florian strikes the perfect balance between grandeur and whimsy.” --School Library Journal 7/1/07 (starred)

Meet the Author

DOUGLAS FLORIAN is the creator of many acclaimed picture books, including mammalabilia, insectlopedia, and beast feast. He lives in New York City.

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Comets, Stars, the Moon, and Mars: Space Poems and Paintings 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Comets: Origin Greek word komet meaning long hair. The Greeks believed the tail on the comets shooting across the sky resembled the long hair found on people of that time. The Eyes on the Sky franchise released a series of books giving more information on the mysteries of the great space above and what the strange stars are made of. The book released on comets provides a deeper understanding of what comets actually are and what dangers they can bring to our earth. The well written book explains the rocks are actually made up of ice gas and carbon from the sun and can vary from the size of a small rock to the size of a school bus. The chapters provide a deep explanation of how these rocks come about and how plants can pull and release the comets from their gravitational pull. Edmond Halley, a great meteorologist of his time, was the first man to calculate the exact arrival time of a certain comet using the theory provided by Newton. This comet was named Halley&rsquo;s Comet, possibly one of the most famous comets, and arrives every 76 years. The information in the chapter about comet arrival also tells about the lesser known comets, Borrelly and Hyakutake, and when these comets will arrive in our sky. The different chapters go more into the creation of the comets and the cold storage they are trapped in while teaching the reader all about the life and the physical structure of a comet. The detailed pictures and diagrams allow the reader to easily understand what is being displayed as well as remember the lesson being taught. Although I believed the book was under the reading capabilities of a high school student, the book proved to be informational as well as helpful in understanding the mysteries of the great comets.