The Comfort Women

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Overview

"The most extensive record available in English of the ugly story."?Elisabeth Rubinfein, New York Newsday
Over 100,000 women across Asia were victims of enforced prostitution by the Japanese Imperial Forces during World War II. Until as recently as 1993 the Japanese government continued to deny this shameful aspect of its wartime history. George Hicks's book is the only history in English regarding this terrible enslavement of women.

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The Comfort Women: Japan's Brutal Regime of Enforced Prostitution in the Second World War

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Overview

"The most extensive record available in English of the ugly story."—Elisabeth Rubinfein, New York Newsday
Over 100,000 women across Asia were victims of enforced prostitution by the Japanese Imperial Forces during World War II. Until as recently as 1993 the Japanese government continued to deny this shameful aspect of its wartime history. George Hicks's book is the only history in English regarding this terrible enslavement of women.

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Editorial Reviews

Leonard Bushkoff - Asian Wall Street Journal Weekly
“George Hicks has delivered a work that is worth taking seriously, not only for its data regarding events decades behind us, but also as part of the campaign to uncover the truth about the Japanese army's actions.”
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A study of the more than 100,000 mostly Korean women forced into sexual slavery at the hands of the Japanese military during WWII. (Oct.)
From Barnes & Noble
For nearly fifty years, a massive coverup by the Japanese government has concealed one of the darkest secrets of the war in the Pacific. This book tells the story of a shameful chapter in the Japanese history of WWII, when hundreds of women, many in their early teens, were tricked, coaxed, and forcibly recruited to act as prostitutes for the Japanese military. Tracing the fight by feminist and liberal groups to expose the truth, the author provides an important new war document that is at the same time a shocking expos‚ and a probing exploration of racial and gender politics in wartime Japan. B&W photos.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393316940
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/28/1997
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

George Hicks is an anthropologist. Much of his work focuses on the experiences of the Japanese during World War II.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 14, 2012

    A case of government-sponsored human trafficking

    Mr. Hicks does a good job laying out the facts without resulting to sensationalism. His style is relatively dry, which actually helps to bring home the horrors endured by these poor women and the atrocities committed against them. To call these victims 'comfort women' as per the original Japanese word downplays the terrible human rights violation perpetrated against them. I consider this an early 20th-century human trafficking case, made all the more horrific because a government led the wide-spread effort to deceive and destroy many young girls' lives. And as long as the Japanese government stubbornly cling to a policy of denial, they'll never be able to rid themselves of their shameful past and move on.

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