Comic Adventures of Boots

Comic Adventures of Boots

by Satoshi Kitamura
     
 

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A collection of comic tales about the lovable but dopey cat, Boots

A welcome return of the sleepy board book character, Boots, last seen and enjoyed in Me and My Cat? In a collection of humorously philosophical tales with titles such as “Operation Fish Biscuit,” and “Pleased to Meet You, Madame Quark,” Boots gets up to all sorts of

Overview

A collection of comic tales about the lovable but dopey cat, Boots

A welcome return of the sleepy board book character, Boots, last seen and enjoyed in Me and My Cat? In a collection of humorously philosophical tales with titles such as “Operation Fish Biscuit,” and “Pleased to Meet You, Madame Quark,” Boots gets up to all sorts of ridiculous mischief. Told in an engaging comic strip style.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"[Kitamura's] books are suffused with both warmth and wit."  —David Wiesner, author, Flotsam, for the New York Times Book Review

"The humor is simultaneously sly and outrageous even on the endpapers and in between the stories."  —School Library Journal starred review

"Kitamura wittily depicts cats as easygoing layabouts in these cinematic comics. . . . With their big ears, dazed eyes and nonplussed expressions, his cats are anything but quick thinkers, and their neighborhood "adventures" unfold at a leisurely pace that heightens the absurd humor."  —Publishers Weekly

David Wiesner
[Kitamura's] books are suffused with both warmth and wit.
The New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly
Kitamura (Angry Arthur) wittily depicts cats as easygoing layabouts in these cinematic comics. In "Operation Fish Biscuit," the marmalade-colored Boots schemes to clear a brick wall of napping felines so he can snag a spot for himself. In play-by-play panels, Boots gets a bag of treats from a cupboard and leaves it on a nearby roof. "This is a necessary sacrifice," he mutters. When his dozing friends catch a whiff ("It must be fish biscuits!"), they form a "cat pyramid" to reach the loot, then teeter and fall with wry commentary ("Timber!" "How many lives do we have?" "Nine, I think..."). In the next story, Boots's visceral responses to a duck ("My claws are sticking out. How peculiar!... I must get it!") are interspersed with the duck's own logic ("Oh no, a cat!... I must run. As fast as I can!"). In the third tale, nine cats play a none-too-skillful game of charades. Leonardo from Me and My Cat? puts in cameos in these episodes, which are punctuated by wordless interludes showing Boots achieving surprising results when he draws and paints. Kitamura expertly storyboards the action and encloses all the written narration in conversational voice bubbles. With their big ears, dazed eyes and nonplussed expressions, his cats are anything but quick thinkers, and their neighborhood "adventures" unfold at a leisurely pace that heightens the absurd humor. Ages 5-up. (Aug.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-The feisty feline from A Friend for Boots and Bath-Time Boots (both Farrar, 1998) is back, this time in three comic-strip adventures. There is "Operation Fish Biscuit," the strongest of the three, in which clever Boots regains his prized sleeping spot from the local squatter cats. He tries to learn how to swim and fly from a duck in "Pleased to Meet You, Madam Quark," and plays in a wacky game of charades organized to ward off kitty boredom in "Let's Play a Guessing Game." Each panel is clean but there sometimes are 12 or more per page. The pen-and-brush illustrations are zany and welcoming. Some pages are positively cluttered with dialogue balloons. Good readers will be undaunted and those who are less accomplished will most likely persevere because of the format and content. The humor is simultaneously sly and outrageous even on the endpapers and in between the stories.-Linda M. Kenton, San Rafael Public Library, CA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Seldom is the text, all of which is in dozens of dialogue balloons, more than incidental in this set of feline hijinks from Kitamura (Me and My Cat?, 2000), and several episodes are entirely wordless. Between long sequences in which Boots, a marmalade-colored kitty, discovers magic in an artist's pen and a tophat, there are interlopers to lure from a favorite sleeping wall ("Operation Fish Biscuit"), swimming lessons to coax from a duck ("Pleased To Meet You, Madam Quark"), a hilarious game of pantomime to wile away a dull day ("Let's Play A Guessing Game."), and other escapades. Kitamura's comic-strip art looks simple at first glance, but he captures an astonishing range of expressions and reactions in his wide-eyed, confused-looking felines, using subtle changes of line or body language that are unfailingly catlike. Kitamura knows cats, as readers who know cats will agree-after they finish laughing. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781842709085
Publisher:
Andersen Press, Limited
Publication date:
05/01/2012
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.75(w) x 11.75(h) x 0.12(d)
Age Range:
5 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Satoshi Kitamura is a Mother Goose Award and Smarties Prize-winning author-illustrator, whose books include Millie's Marvelous Hat and What's Wrong with My Hair? They previous collaborated on A Boy Wants a Dinosaur.

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