Coming Apart at the Seams: How Baseball Owners, Players, Agents and Television Executives Have Led Our National Pastime to the Brink of Disaster

Overview

But can baseball survive? For years, it has. Yet now, as the national pastime aims toward the twenty-first century, the game is beset with monumental problems. Player salaries are out of sight. Television revenues are about to plummet. Several clubs are up for sale. Others claim they have great difficulty in making their team payroll. Newspaper columnists everywhere complain that the games run too long and that the World Series games start too late for the next generation of baseball fans to watch them. Baseball ...
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1993 Hardcover 25424114. Brand New; 9.75 x 1 x 6.75 Inches; 266 pages.

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Overview

But can baseball survive? For years, it has. Yet now, as the national pastime aims toward the twenty-first century, the game is beset with monumental problems. Player salaries are out of sight. Television revenues are about to plummet. Several clubs are up for sale. Others claim they have great difficulty in making their team payroll. Newspaper columnists everywhere complain that the games run too long and that the World Series games start too late for the next generation of baseball fans to watch them. Baseball insiders argue that the talent pool at the major league level is extremely thin - and now, two new expansion teams come into existence in the spring of 1993. Poll after poll shows that not only has the National Football League long passed baseball as America's favorite, but that the National Basketball Association has already bypassed major league baseball as well. And of course, since the owners forced Fay Vincent to quit, there hasn't been a commissioner to grapple with all these knotty problems. And so the sport of baseball rumbles on, without any real direction nor any long-range plan to deal with its pressing concerns. Indeed, the future of what was once a leisurely pastime hangs in the balance. Like an old ball that has been smacked around once too often, major league baseball is quickly coming apart at the seams.
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Editorial Reviews

Wes Lukowsky
Gammons may be the most respected baseball writer around. He spent years as a beat reporter for the "Boston Globe" and now is ESPN's lead baseball man. Sands is a sports agent and Boston attorney. And who wouldn't need an attorney to sort out the issues in professional baseball? The basic premise here will surprise no one who follows the no-longer Grand Old Game: baseball is self-destructing before our outraged eyes. The topic is familiar, but Gammons and Sands do the best job yet of detailing the "whys and hows." The "why" lineup includes a modern-day Murderer's Row of greedy players; goofy, ego-crazed owners; self-serving agents; and, of course, manipulative television executives. The key "how" is the inability of the owners and the player's union to realize that each side needs to care for the golden goose. Unlike other books dealing with the business of sport, this one never suffers from dryness. Gammons ably paints the large picture with small, telling examples. His anecdotes concerning the bizarre arbitration process, for example, are little jewels of the absurd. And, of course, the egos on parade--owners, players, and agents--are daunting indeed. This is must reading for anyone concerned with the future of the national pastime.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780025424111
  • Publisher: Macmillan Publishing Company, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/15/1993
  • Pages: 266

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