Coming Home: From the Life of Langston Hughes

Overview

Young Langston Hughes was a dreamer. He dreamed about heroes like Booker T. Washington, who was black just like him. When he heard the clackety-clack of train wheels, he dreamed about the places it had been. But most of all, he dreamed about having a happy home. And so, one day, he began turning those dreams into beautiful prose. As he did, he discovered where his home really was-in the words and rhythms of his poetry that reached people all over the world. The beloved Langston Hughes comes to life in a book for ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$6.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (25) from $1.99   
  • New (12) from $3.64   
  • Used (13) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Young Langston Hughes was a dreamer. He dreamed about heroes like Booker T. Washington, who was black just like him. When he heard the clackety-clack of train wheels, he dreamed about the places it had been. But most of all, he dreamed about having a happy home. And so, one day, he began turning those dreams into beautiful prose. As he did, he discovered where his home really was-in the words and rhythms of his poetry that reached people all over the world. The beloved Langston Hughes comes to life in a book for poets, dreamers, children and adults -anyone who has ever thought of what home means to them. 'Teachers looking for a good way to introduce youngsters to this prominent poet will find this book to be an excellent accompaniment to his work.' —School Library Journal 'Like Hughes' poetry, the power of Cooper's story is that it confronts sadness even as it transcends it.' —Booklist 'His text is as inviting as his illustrations.' —The New York Times Book Review

Writer Langston Hughes is an inspiration for youth everywhere. Now children can discover the young Langston and the events and circumstances that shaped his extraordinary life. Floyd's stunning illustrations and colorful text capture the special moments in Langston's life and invite young readers to learn about the power of hope.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This insightful picture book illuminates, in both words and art, moments from the childhood of poet Langston Hughes (1902-1967). Facing difficult times with his parents because of segregation and other forms of racism, Hughes spent many of his early years in the care of his grandmother in Lawrence, Kans. As told by Cooper ( From Miss Ida's Porch ) in the first book he has written as well as illustrated, the wide-open Midwest offers Langston plenty of space to dream, but staying with poor and aging Grandma proves mostly sad and lonely. An eventual move to the home of family friends ushers in a rosy period of love and care that encourages Hughes's burgeoning writing career. Young readers may not understand how Hughes's childhood shaped his adult work, but they are likely to enjoy this story in and of itself. Warmly lit oil portraits, so atmospheric that the sounds of daily life seem to emanate from them, are almost sure to prompt questions about the era, while a muted palette of browns, golds and pinks establishes a comfortable mood. A fine tribute. Ages 7-10. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
This is the first picture book Floyd Cooper has both illustrated and written and the combined power of his two art forms is stunning. Hughes and Cooper share a poetic soul, for Cooper's voice is filled with a lyricism uncommon in most biographies. Cooper focusses on Hughes' early life, which is most appropriate for the book's intended child audience. He writes of a lonely boy, who is only partially comforted by his storytelling grandmother, who would wrap him in a torn shawl and " in family stories of pride and glory." Cooper gently tells of Hughes' longing to be reunited with his mother and father and the occasional trips to visit his mother in Kansas City, where he would wander "riding his ears around the city," hearing "jazzy old blues music that drifted down the alleys and tickled his soul" with rhythms he never forgot. Cooper knows how to balance emotion and technique, and darks and lights in illustrations. He applies the same skill to words; the telling of a difficult life has a satisfying end. Hughes discovered that "home was in him."
Children's Literature
"I have always thought of Langston Hughes as a beacon for all dreamers," writes Cooper in the Author's Note of his newest book. This magnificently illustrated picture book captures the true and inspiring portrayal of Hughes childhood, his loneliness and dreams, racial indignities, and adult successes. Hughes, who was raised by his grandmother, always dreamed of having a real home, reunited with his mother and father. He inextricably wove his own life experiences into his written words and became an internationally known writer and poet. Langston Hughes finally did find a "home" within himself, fostered by pride in his family heritage. Cooper recreates Hughes's life story for all ages and generations for come.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Bagel
"I have always thought of Langston Hughes as a beacon for all dreamers," writes Cooper in the Author's Note of his newest book. This magnificently illustrated picture book captures the true and inspiring portrayal of Hughes childhood, his loneliness and dreams, racial indignities, and adult successes. Hughes, who was raised by his grandmother, always dreamed of having a real home, reunited with his mother and father. He inextricably wove his own life experiences into his written words and became an internationally known writer and poet. Langston Hughes finally did find a "home" within himself, fostered by pride in his family heritage. Cooper recreates Hughes's life story for all ages and generations for come.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-Langston Hughes's lonely boyhood is presented with empathy in this picture-book biography. Cooper recounts how Hughes was raised by his grandmother, whose vivid stories of black heroism fueled his imagination, until she, with age, retreated into silence. His mostly absent parents appeared briefly but were unable to offer him a real parental relationship. When he moved in with family friends, he felt for the first time what it was like to have a home. Cooper's writing proves equal to his artwork in highlighting elements that convey the emotion and important events from his subject's youth. His earth-toned, hazy paintings have little detail but expressively depict moments and people. This does not attempt to be a complete biography. Rather, it focuses on those aspects of Hughes's childhood that relate to the central theme of finding a home. Teachers looking for a good way to introduce youngsters to this prominent poet will find this book to be an excellent accompaniment to his work.-Louise L. Sherman, Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698116122
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/1998
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 253,028
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.02 (w) x 10.28 (h) x 0.14 (d)

Meet the Author

When Floyd Cooper discovered children's book illustrating, he found a way to complement his career in advertising. An apprentice of Mark English, Mr. Cooper began his freelance career while still a student at the University of Oklahoma. After graduating, he made his way to Missouri, where he secured a position at a greeting card company.

Although Mr. Cooper was established in his position there, he felt somewhat stifled. He lacked the freedom and opportunity for spontaneity that he longed for as an artist and the joy that could be found in doing something that he loved.

Determined to break out of the mundane cycle he found himself in, Mr. Cooper relocated to the East Coast in 1984 to pursue his career further. It was there that he discovered the world of children's book illustrating and was amazed by the opportunities for creativity it afforded. Mr. Cooper was energized. The first book he illustrated, Grandpa's Face, captivated reviewers. Publishers Weekly said of newcomer Floyd Cooper's work, "Cooper, in his first picture book, creates family scenes of extraordinary illumination. He reinforces in the pictures the feelings of warmth and affection that exist between generations."

Illustrating children's books is very important to Mr. Cooper. He says, "I feel children are at the frontline in improving society. This might sound a little heavy, but it's true. I feel children's picture books play a role in counteracting all the violence and other negative images conveyed in the media."

Floyd Cooper resides in New Jersey with his wife, Velma, and their two sons.

copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)