Coming of Age as a Poet: Milton, Keats, Eliot, Plath

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To find a personal style is, for a writer, to become adult; and to write one's first "perfect" poem—a poem that wholly and successfully embodies that style—is to come of age as a poet. By looking at the precedents, circumstances, and artistry of the first perfect poems composed by John Milton, John Keats, T. S. Eliot, and Sylvia Plath, Coming of Age as a Poet offers rare insight into this mysterious process, and into the indispensable period of learning and experimentation that ...

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Overview

To find a personal style is, for a writer, to become adult; and to write one's first "perfect" poem—a poem that wholly and successfully embodies that style—is to come of age as a poet. By looking at the precedents, circumstances, and artistry of the first perfect poems composed by John Milton, John Keats, T. S. Eliot, and Sylvia Plath, Coming of Age as a Poet offers rare insight into this mysterious process, and into the indispensable period of learning and experimentation that precedes such poetic achievement.

Milton's L'Allegro, Keats's On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Eliot's The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, and Plath's The Colossus are the poems that Helen Vendler considers, exploring each as an accession to poetic confidence, mastery, and maturity. In meticulous and sympathetic readings of the poems, and with reference to earlier youthful compositions, she delineates the context and the terms of each poet's self-discovery—and illuminates the private, intense, and ultimately heroic effort and endurance that precede the creation of any memorable poem.

With characteristic precision, authority, and grace, Vendler helps us to appreciate anew the conception and the practice of poetry, and to observe at first hand the living organism that breathes through the words of a great poem.

To find a personal style is, for a writer, to become adult; and to write one's first "perfect" poem--a poem that wholly and successfully embodies that style--is to come of age as a poet. By looking at the precedents, circumstances, and artistry of the first perfect poems composed by John Milton, John Keats, T. S. Eliot, and Sylvia Plath, Coming of Age as a Poet offers rare insight into this mysterious process, and into the indispensable period of learning and experimentation that precedes such poetic achievement.

Milton's L'Allegro, Keats's On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Eliot's The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, and Plath's The Colossus are the poems that Helen Vendler considers, exploring each as an accession to poetic confidence, mastery, and maturity. In meticulous and sympathetic readings of the poems, and with reference to earlier youthful compositions, she delineates the context and the terms of each poet's self-discovery--and illuminates the private, intense, and ultimately heroic effort and endurance that precede the creation of any memorable poem.

With characteristic precision, authority, and grace, Vendler helps us to appreciate anew the conception and the practice of poetry, and to observe at first hand the living organism that breathes through the words of a great poem.

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Editorial Reviews

Bloomsbury Review
[Vendler] has offered up a brief but profound inspiration to any reader willing to take the time to move slowly, with curiosity and attention, through her investigation of four cases of great poetry.
— Len Edgerly
Boston Review
[Vendler's] attention to the psychological and aesthetic unraveling of the poet's calling turns the microscopic into the majestic.
— Jacques Khalip
Boston Sunday Globe
Where does a poet's voice come from and of what is it forged? There's a question to bring out bootless reductionism if ever there was one, yet Helen Vendler explores it magnificently in its complexity and nuance in Coming of Age as a Poet.
— Katherine A. Powers
Choice
Though modest in size, Coming of Age contains numerous original insights into the creative process, especially into that formative period in which a poet finds his or her technique, style, and voice.
— D. D. Kummings
Dallas Morning News
Using Milton, Keats, Eliot and Path as her case studies, Ms. Vendler 'consider[s] the work a young poet has to have done before writing his or her first "perfect poem"--the poem which first wholly succeeds in embodying a coherent personal style.' This is a bold claim and a challenging book, but Ms. Vendler succeeds brilliantly in keeping us hooked. By the end we are better readers.
— Tom Mayo
Guardian
A clear but subtle account of the struggles, the rites of passage, undergone by four poets, while still in their 20s, negotiating with tradition in order to find their style and attain their majority--to become, in fact, major poets...Each chapter becomes a short story, a thrillingly compressed account of the vicissitudes of genius...It is a pleasure to be guided by [Vendler] into the poet's workshop--she is so good at making poetry matter, at opening up the interest of passages one had dully taken for granted.
— Philip Horne
Los Angeles Times Book Review
Reading a Vendler essay is like coming home to the cave; like entering the mind of the poet. In Coming of Age as a Poet, a collection of four essays, Vendler looks at the point in the lives of four poets...when they came into their own maturity as poets, found their discourses, the styles and the voices that would make them immortal...Vendler shows them on their vulnerable ascents to greatness.
— Susan Salter Reynolds
Milton Quarterly
Helen Vendler is an invaluable presence in current literary studies because she knows that poems matter less for their thought than for their thinking--less, that is, for the ideological stances, usually familiar, that they adopt than for the processes of thinking and feeling and reacting that they re-create in us...She knows that "it is the writing that gives the theme life", and that "a writer's true 'vision' lies in the implications of his or her style." Rather than reducing poems to grist for the dark mills of ideology or theory, or getting the better of them by showing what she can do with them, she seeks to "e-valuate" them by drawing out their human significance. The case presented in Coming of Age as a Poet is straightforward: she sets the first "perfect" poem by each of her four poets--"the poem which first wholly succeeds in embodying a coherent personal style"--against their earlier attempts.
— John Creaser
New York Review of Books
Helen Vendler begins her brief study with a persuasive and delightful piece on the young Milton...[She] is brilliant on Keat's comparatively slow but sure practicing on the Petrarchan model...She is equally good, by contrast, on the gradual evolution of Eliot's 'The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock'...[This book is] full of perceptions and rewards that send one scurrying back to the text.
— John Bayley
The Weekend Australian
As to books about poetry, you could hardly do better than Coming of Age as a Poet by superb U.S. critic Helen Vendler, in which she illuminates the first perfect poems by John Milton, John Keats, T. S. Eliot and Sylvia Plath. If in doubt about your critical criteria, read Vendler.
— Barry Hill
Year's Work in English Studies
This succinct but wide-ranging book, which began life as the James Murray Brown Lectures at the University of Aberdeen, looks to the early work of a number of poets in order to understand their individual quests for a personal style, for a voice or voices, and for a place in the world.
The New York Times
Coming of Age as a Poet feel claustrophobic at times, it is because Vendler is a proud practitioner of the art of close reading. She is critical of the work of upstart New Historicist or poststructuralist critics who insist on posing a relationship between art and politics. She succeeds in revealing the aesthetic power and technical beauty of great poetry. — Laura Ciokowski
Library Journal
Two new entries in the recent spate of books about poetry delve into that elusive concept, the poet's voice. In To Sound Like Yourself, The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Snodgrass offers six lengthy essays examining wordplay, musicality, and other elements that contribute to a distinctive voice. He includes lively descriptions of his own sources of inspiration-owls and belly dancers among them-as well as analysis of other poets, from Whitman to Wordsworth. At times, his complex evaluations seem culled from a graduate-level literature course, assuming familiarity with lesser-known writers, a grasp of music notation, and training in other languages. In Coming of Age as a Poet, Vendler, a renowned poetry critic and author, chooses one breakthrough poem by each of four poets-Milton, Keats, Eliot, and Plath. Through close readings of their structure, imagery, and scansion, she shows how these poems mark each poet's mastery of a unique voice. Three of the four chapters are based on lectures given at the University of Aberdeen. The clarity and expert analysis of all four poems could engage even a casual reader, while the breadth of scholarship and unique interpretations will appeal to more experienced poetry readers. Vendler's work is highly recommended for public and academic libraries, while Snodgrass's work is more appropriate for large university libraries.-Vivian Reed, California State Univ., Long Beach Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674010246
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 2/20/2003
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 5.76 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.82 (d)

Meet the Author

Helen Vendler is A. Kingsley Porter University Professor at Harvard University.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1
1 John Milton: The Elements of Happiness 11
2 John Keats: Perfecting the Sonnet 41
3 T. S. Eliot: Inventing Prufrock 81
4 Sylvia Plath: Reconstructing the Colossus 115
Notes 159
Credits 169
Index 171
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