Coming on Strong: Gender and Sexuality in Twentieth-Century Women's Sport

Coming on Strong: Gender and Sexuality in Twentieth-Century Women's Sport

by Susan K. Cahn
     
 

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Drawing on historical records and contemporary interviews, Cahn chronicles the remarkable transformation made by women's sports in the the 20th century, revealing the struggles faced by women to overcome social constraints and behavior codes, and how sport has changes their lives. Photos.  See more details below

Overview

Drawing on historical records and contemporary interviews, Cahn chronicles the remarkable transformation made by women's sports in the the 20th century, revealing the struggles faced by women to overcome social constraints and behavior codes, and how sport has changes their lives. Photos.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Cahn, who teaches history at the State University of New York, here reworks her Ph.D. dissertation and comes up with a winner. Readers will be either amused or infuriated by her discussion of patronizing male attitudes toward the moral and physical dangers of female athletic activity during the 19th and early 20th centuries. And while subsequent years brought more enlightenment, women athletes have always had extra obstacles to overcome: in the 1920s and '30s, physical ed teachers preached ``moderation,'' downplaying or banning competitive sport. The '40s and '50s were marked by the attitude that all sports were mannish and the women who excelled in them were probably lesbians; it also brought the WW II phenomenon of the short-lived All-American Girls Baseball League. Following the '60s, a decade of progress and acceptance, women are still trying to wrest control over their athletic activities from men. (Feb.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
In roughly chronological order, Cahn (history, SUNY-Buffalo) illuminates issues of race, class, and gender in an entertaining social history that exposes society's pervasive infrastructure of male dominance. In a depressing litany of restrictions against women in athletics, Cahn illustrates her theme that the acceptance of athleticism as a masculine trait is only socially constructed, and thus, changeable. On the individual level, athletes often have to resolve differences between their love for sports and society's disapproval. By interviewing elite athletes, she explores compulsory heterosexuality and femininity. Special scrutiny is given to black track and field athletes, basketball, pro baseball, and lesbians. This book does in a scholarly way what Mariah Nelson's Are We Winning Yet? ( LJ 2/1/91) did in a more popular vein. The copious notes are a researcher's gold mine. Recommended for all academic libraries, community college through graduate level.-- Kathy Ruffle, Coll. of New Caledonia Lib., Prince George, B.C.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780029050750
Publisher:
Free Press
Publication date:
02/15/1994
Pages:
358
Product dimensions:
6.44(w) x 9.53(h) x 1.48(d)

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