The Coming to America Cookbook: Delicious Recipes and Fascinating Stories from America's Many Cultures

Overview

COOK UP A HEAPING DISH OF CULTURE WITH TASTY RECIPES FROM AMERICAN IMMIGRANTS

Who knew culture could be so delicious? In THE COMING TO AMERICA COOKBOOK, you'll discover how America's immigrants have lived and dined over the centuries. This scrumptious survey of a wide variety of cuisine—Mexican, Irish, Chinese, Moroccan, Turkish, Ethiopian, Nigerian, and many more—blends together an appetizing mix of kid-friendly recipes and fun food facts ...

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Overview

COOK UP A HEAPING DISH OF CULTURE WITH TASTY RECIPES FROM AMERICAN IMMIGRANTS

Who knew culture could be so delicious? In THE COMING TO AMERICA COOKBOOK, you'll discover how America's immigrants have lived and dined over the centuries. This scrumptious survey of a wide variety of cuisine—Mexican, Irish, Chinese, Moroccan, Turkish, Ethiopian, Nigerian, and many more—blends together an appetizing mix of kid-friendly recipes and fun food facts throughout each chapter.

Kids will have a great time learning about each culture's distinctive foods and traditions while they cook up easy and yummy recipes, including:
* NAAN, a bread made with yogurt, which is a staple of Indian cooking
* SAVORY SHRIMP OVER RICE, a recipe from Northern Italy passed down through generations
* BRATWURST WITH SAUERKRAUT, a favorite dish of Wisconsin, where many Germans settles in the nineteenth century
* BANANA STRAWBERRY BATIDOS, icy Cuban drinks that are as common as cola in cities with many Cuban residents, such as Miami
* DUTCH WINDMILL COOKIES, which are traditionally made in the Netherlands at Christmas time

THE COMING TO AMERICA COOKBOOK also includes information on cooking tools and skills, with important rules for kitchen safety and cleaning up.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Bringing culture to the kitchen, The Coming to America Cookbook: Delicious Recipes and Fascinating Stories from America's Many Cultures by Joan D'Amico and Karen Eich Drummond, illus. by Lizzy Rockwell and Tina Cash-Walsh, introduces aspiring chefs to such exotic dishes as "Ethiopian Injera" and "Moroccan Lemon Anise Bread," while describing how foods we now consider staples in the U.S., such as salsa and hummus, came to this country, offering recipes and short history lessons. Often, tips on how to use special equipment, such as a wok for chicken lo mein, come into play. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Eighteen countries are represented in this cookbook for older children. Some of each country's familiar recipes are here, such as stuffed cabbage rolls from Poland and hummus from Lebanon. Side dishes, entrees and desserts are also included. The cookbook begins with a "Tools of the Trade" section dealing with cooking equipment, cooking skills and safety rules. Appropriate illustrations, lists, and subtitles make this introduction user-friendly. Especially commendable are the two paragraphs on cracking and separating eggs. If the introduction does not impress the reader, each country's chapter will with its readable explanation about the country, its location, its culture, its language and its food customs. The emphasis is placed on the cooking traditions the immigrants from each country brought to America. We learn, for example, that Cuban dishes "frequently contain tomatoes, garlic, peppers, onions, lime, and olives." Beyond the 2 or 3 recipes per country, each chapter also lists the favorite dishes of the country. Back matter includes a lengthy glossary and an index. Schools would benefit from such a cookbook because it contains more than recipes; it is a practical approach to multiculturalism. 2005, John Wiley & Sons, Ages 9 to 12.
—Jacki Vawter, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-Eighteen countries, including Brazil, Ethiopia, Norway, and South Korea, are represented in this book that offers recipes as well as some background on how cooking and dining are affected by a nation's climate, geography, culture, and history. Also provided are a few details about the country's typical immigration patterns to the U.S. and how some dishes have been Americanized over time. While the simple black-and-white illustrations depict young people, the recipes are not necessarily for beginners: many require fairly specialized ingredients and/or complicated techniques. There is a good balance of main dishes, side dishes, vegetarian meals, and sweets. Safety rules, step-by-step instructions, preparation times, and lists of utensils needed are given, but nutritional information is not. Diane Simone Vezza's Passport on a Plate (S & S, 1997) is a more attractive book for those who are interested only in recipes from other countries. Mark H. Zanger's The American Ethnic Cookbook for Students (Oryx, 2001) focuses on immigration but is for older readers. Overall, D'Amico's title might be useful for larger collections, especially where the topic is frequently assigned.-Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471483359
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 3/4/2005
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 1,293,878
  • Age range: 9 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.54 (w) x 9.35 (h) x 0.39 (d)

Meet the Author

JOAN D’AMICO is a cooking instructor at King’s Cookingstudio in New Jersey and an educational consultant.

KAREN EICH DRUMMOND is a registered dietitian and the author of several adult cookbooks.
The two also coauthored The Science Chef, The Science Chef Travels Around the World, The Math Chef, The Healthy Body Cookbook, The United States Cookbook and The U.S. History Cookbook, all from Wiley.

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Table of Contents

About This Book.

Discovering the Kitchen.

Tools of the Trade.

Cooking Skills.

Cutting.

Measuring.

Mixing.

Stovetop Cooking.

Cracking and Separating Eggs.

Safety Rules.

Around the Stove and Oven.

Using Any Appliance.

Using a Microwave Oven.

Using a Knife.

Cleaning Up.

Chapter 1. Brazil.

Churrasco.

Classic Corn Cakes.

Fried Bananas With Cinnamon.

Chapter 2. China.

Chicken Lo Mein.

Sichuan-Style Beef Stir-Fry With Rice.

Ginger Scented Fruits With Orange Sorbet.

Chapter 3. Cuba.

Cuban Sandwich.

Banana Strawberry Batidos.

Cuban Black Bean Soup.

Chapter 4. Ethiopia.

Ethiopian Injera.

Ethiopian Vegetable Bowl.

Chapter 5. Germany.

Bratwurst with Sauerkraut.

German Potato Salad.

Gingerbread People.

Chapter 6. India.

Naan.

Curried Chicken.

Basmati Rice.

Chapter 7. Ireland.

Mom's Irish Soda Bread.

Corned Beef and Cabbage Dinner.

Anytime Apple and Blackberry Pie.

Chapter 8. Italy.

Everyday Escarole, Bean, and Barley Soup.

Savory Shrimp Dinner Over Rice.

Filomena's Love Knot Cookies.

Chapter 9. Lebanon.

Hummus Bi-tahini.

Ree's Tabbouleh.

Chapter 10. Mexico.

Amazing Avocado Dip.

Oh-So-Hot Salsa.

Awesome Tex-Mex Spuds.

Mexican Bean Salad.

Chapter 11. Morocco.

Zuri's Orange Nut Couscous.

Banana Milkshake.

Moroccan Lemon Anise Bread.

Chapter 12. The Netherlands.

Dutch Stew.

Dutch Apple Cake.

Dutch Windmill Cookies.

Chapter 13. Nigeria.

Sausage Roll.

Mashed Yams.

Chapter 14. Norway.

Open-Faced Roast Beef Sandwich.

Norwegian Waffles.

Shilling Bun.

Chapter 15. Poland.

Mildred Goldberg's Amazing Stuffed Cabbage Rolls.

The Ultimate Pierogies.

Orange-Iced Babka.

Chapter 16. South Korea.

Korean-Style Short Ribs.

Korean Sweet Rice Cakes.

Amazing Asian Dumpling Soup.

Chapter 17. Thailand.

Thai Chicken Salad.

Sticky Rice With Fruit.

Chapter 18. Turkey.

Bob's Scrambled Eggs.

Overstuffed Zucchini.

The Best Baklava.

Glossary.

Index.

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