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Comment Parler en Public [NOOK Book]

Overview

La meilleure façon de devenir un orateur confiant, efficace, selon les auteurs de ce livre, est tout simplement de le faire. Pratique, pratique, pratique. Et pendant que vous y êtes, suppose que le positif. Avoir quelque chose à dire. Oubliez le soi. Chasser la peur. Être absorbée par votre sujet. Et surtout, s'attendre à des succès. "Si vous croyez que vous allez échouer," écrivent-ils, "il y a espoir pour vous. Vous voulez. » DALE CARNEGIE (1888-1955), un pionnier dans l'art oratoire et le développement de la ...
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Comment Parler en Public

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Overview

La meilleure façon de devenir un orateur confiant, efficace, selon les auteurs de ce livre, est tout simplement de le faire. Pratique, pratique, pratique. Et pendant que vous y êtes, suppose que le positif. Avoir quelque chose à dire. Oubliez le soi. Chasser la peur. Être absorbée par votre sujet. Et surtout, s'attendre à des succès. "Si vous croyez que vous allez échouer," écrivent-ils, "il y a espoir pour vous. Vous voulez. » DALE CARNEGIE (1888-1955), un pionnier dans l'art oratoire et le développement de la personnalité, a gagné la renommée de l'enseigner aux autres comment faire pour réussir. Son livre How to Win Friends et influencer les gens (1936) a vendu plus de 10 millions d'exemplaires. Il a également fondé la Dale Carnegie Institute pour l'Artoire et les Relations humaines, avec des branches dans le monde entier. JOSEPH BERG ESENWEIN (1867-1946) a également écrit The Art of Story-écriture, écrivant le Photoplay (avec Arthur Leeds) et les enfants pour l'histoires et comment leur dire
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016799933
  • Publisher: Nook Classics
  • Publication date: 6/26/2013
  • Language: French
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 528
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Dale Breckenridge Carnegie (originally Carnagey until 1922 and possibly somewhat later) (November 24, 1888 – November 1, 1955) was an American writer and lecturer and the developer of famous courses in self-improvement, salesmanship, corporate training, public speaking and interpersonal skills. Born in poverty on a farm in Missouri, he was the author of How to Win Friends and Influence People, first published in 1936, a massive bestseller that remains popular today. He also wrote a biography of Abraham Lincoln, titled Lincoln the Unknown, as well as several other books.

Carnegie was an early proponent of what is now called responsibility assumption, although this only appears minutely in his written work. One of the core ideas in his books is that it is possible to change other people's behavior by changing one's reaction to them.

Born in 1888 in Maryville, Missouri, Carnegie was a poor farmer's boy, the second son of James William Carnagey and wife Amanda Elizabeth Harbison (b. Missouri, February 1858 – living 1910). In his teens, though still having to get up at 4 a.m. every day to milk his parents' cows, he managed to get educated at the State Teacher's College in Warrensburg. His first job after college was selling correspondence courses to ranchers; then he moved on to selling bacon, soap and lard for Armour & Company. He was successful to the point of making his sales territory of South Omaha, Nebraska the national leader for the firm.

After saving $500, Carnegie quit sales in 1911 in order to pursue a lifelong dream of becoming a Chautauqua lecturer. He ended up instead attending the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York, but found little success as an actor, though it is written that he played the role of Dr. Hartley in a road show of Polly of the Circus.[citation needed] When the production ended, he returned to New York, unemployed, nearly broke, and living at the YMCA on 125th Street. It was there that he got the idea to teach public speaking, and he persuaded the "Y" manager to allow him to instruct a class in return for 80% of the net proceeds. In his first session, he had run out of material; improvising, he suggested that students speak about "something that made them angry", and discovered that the technique made speakers unafraid to address a public audience. From this 1912 debut, the Dale Carnegie Course evolved. Carnegie had tapped into the average American's desire to have more self-confi
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2013

    Sparfire

    Hah ouch, Raggedear had loved Mysteryflower so much....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2013

    Prologue comments

    To "Dark Hopes and Trials" by LightBlood here. Talk to her at res 7.

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