Commentaries on the laws of England

Commentaries on the laws of England

by William Blackstone
     
 

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This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.… See more details below

Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940019150625
Publisher:
Oxford Printed at the Clarendon Press
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

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ANALYSIS. BOOK III.-OF PRIVATE WRONGS. CHAPTER I. Ur Tub Redress Of Private Wrongs ?? The Mere Act Op The Parties Page 2 to 16 1. Wrongs are the privation of right; and are, I. Private. II. Public 2 2. Private wrongs, or civil injuries, are an infringement, or privation, of the civil rights of individuals, considered as individuals 2 8. The redress of civil injuries is one principal object of the laws of England 3 4. This redress is effected, I. By the mere act of the parties. II. By the mere operation of law. III. By both together, or suit in courts 8 f. Redress by the mere act of the parties is that which arises, I. From the sole act of the party injured. II. From the joint act of all the parties 3 6. Of the first sort are, I. Defence of one's self, or relations. II. Recaption of goods. III. Entry on lands and tenements. IV. Abatement of nuisances. V. Distress -- for rent, for suit or service, for amercements, for damage, or for divers statu- table penalties, -- made of such things only as are legally distrainable ; and taken and disposed of according to the due courseof law. VI. Seizing ofheriota,

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