Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians (Formatted & Optimized for Nook)

Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians (Formatted & Optimized for Nook)

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by Martin Luther
     
 

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The e-text comes with a full Table of Contents, allowing you to easily move between chapters. Within seconds, you'll be able to read any part of the book that you want! It's been formatted for the Nook to allow you the best reading experience.
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"There is one book that Luther himself likes better than any other. Let us begin with that: his Commentary on… See more details below

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The e-text comes with a full Table of Contents, allowing you to easily move between chapters. Within seconds, you'll be able to read any part of the book that you want! It's been formatted for the Nook to allow you the best reading experience.
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"There is one book that Luther himself likes better than any other. Let us begin with that: his Commentary on Galatians. . ."

The undertaking, which seemed so attractive when viewed as a literary task, proved a most difficult one, and at times became oppressive. The Letter to the Galatians consists of six short chapters. Luther's commentary fills seven hundred and thirty-three octavo pages in the Weidman Edition of his works. It was written in Latin. We were resolved not to present this entire mass of exegesis. It would have run to more than fifteen hundred pages, ordinary octavo (like this), since it is impossible to use the compressed structure of sentences which is characteristic of Latin, and particularly of Luther's Latin. The work had to be condensed. German and English translations are available, but the most acceptable English version, besides laboring under the handicaps of an archaic style, had to be condensed into half its volume in order to accomplish the "streamlining" of the book. Whatever merit the translation now presented to the reader may possess should be written to the credit of Rev. Gerhardt Mahler of Geneva, N.Y., who came to my assistance in a very busy season by making a rough draft of the translation and later preparing a revision of it, which forms the basis of the final draft submitted to the printer. A word should now be said about the origin of Luther's Commentary on Galatians.

The Reformer had lectured on this Epistle of St. Paul's in 1519 and again in 1523. It was his favorite among all the Biblical books. In his table talks the saying is recorded: "The Epistle to the Galatians is my epistle. To it I am as it were in wedlock. It is my Katherine." Much later when a friend of his was preparing an edition of all his Latin works, he remarked to his home circle: "If I had my way about it they would republish only those of my books which have doctrine. My Galatians, for instance. "The lectures which are preserved in the works herewith submitted to the American public were delivered in 1531. They were taken down by George Roerer, who held something of a deanship at Wittenberg University and who was one of Luther's aids in the translation of the Bible. Roerer took down Luther's lectures and this manuscript has been preserved to the present day, in a copy which contains also additions by Veit Dietrich and by Cruciger, friends of Roerer's, who with him attended Luther's lectures. In other words, these three men took down the lectures which Luther addressed to his students in the course of Galatians, and Roerer prepared the manuscript for the printer. A German translation by Justus Menius appeared in the Wittenberg Edition of Luther's writings, published in 1539.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012394606
Publisher:
Martin Luther
Publication date:
03/21/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

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