×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Commission government in American cities
     

Commission government in American cities

by Ernest Smith Bradford
 
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940016951911
Publisher:
New York, The Macmillan company
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
576 KB

Read an Excerpt


tion because of a lack of concentration of power; it was neglectful of the interests of the city because it was not accountable to the electorate as a whole. These two flaws in the municipal machinery, common to many cities, had become so evident that special attention was given to their elimination in the new measure. The V commission law abolished election by wards ; reduced the Council to five, including the mayor; provided that all officials, except these five, should be chosen by the Council — features copied from the Galveston plan; it took the Houston referendum and greatly broadened it; added a "recall" for unsatisfactory councilmen; the initiative; a nonpartisan ballot for primaries and elections, and certain other interesting provisions, all designed to simplify the form of government, to concentrate authority, and to provide definite and easy popular control, free of partisanship. / The Iowa law, or, as it is sometimes called, the " Des Moines Plan," has been the model for so many recent charters that it is of interest to quote its most important provisions.1 Each city adopting the commission plan " shall be governed by a council, consisting of the mayor and four councilmen,2 chosen as provided in this act, each of whom shall have the right to vote on all questions coming before the council. Three members of the council shall constitute a quorum, and the affirmative vote of three members shall be necessary to adopt any motion, resolution, or ordinance, or pass any measure, unless a greaternumber is provided for in this act. ... The mayor shall preside at all meetings of the council; he shall have no power to veto any measure, but every resolution or ordinance,passed by the council, must be signed by the mayor, or by two councilmen, and be recorded before the same...

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews