Common Grounds: Conversations about the Things That Matter Most

Common Grounds: Conversations about the Things That Matter Most

5.0 1
by Glenn Lucke, Ben Young
     
 

“Brad, Lauren, and Jarrod sit around a table at Common Grounds, enjoying their weekly Sunday evening get-together. The three are old college friends and, like many of their classmates, they started their careers in Houston . . . they make time on Sunday evenings to catch up, laugh, and compare notes on life . . . ” Three friends all at different places

Overview


“Brad, Lauren, and Jarrod sit around a table at Common Grounds, enjoying their weekly Sunday evening get-together. The three are old college friends and, like many of their classmates, they started their careers in Houston . . . they make time on Sunday evenings to catch up, laugh, and compare notes on life . . . ” Three friends all at different places in the journey. A Southern Baptist, a nonpracticing Catholic, and a non-believer all meet a retired seminary professor who becomes their Socratic guide to explore Christ’s teachings.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805426977
Publisher:
B&H Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/01/2003
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.63(d)

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Common Grounds: Conversations about the Things That Matter Most 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Texas-Buckeye More than 1 year ago
Have you ever had a discussion about the Bible and Christianity with someone, but you could not reach them? This book will not assist you in making that person understand the truths of Christianity, but it will help your understanding of why. This book contains the best explanation of presuppositionalism I have ever read. The book centers on the conversatons of four fictional friends, but their conversations mirror many that I have had with freinds and family when discussing Christianity. The explanations are clear and concise without the use of theological terminology. The authors make the characters seem real and the conversations even more so. My favorite part of the book is when the professor explains why the truths that we accept as given as Christians are not apparent to others. However, true to the Great Commission, after explaining why others cannot come to accept the truth, he continues on with his discussion of those truths. A very practical lesson on the Biblical truth that it is our responsibilty to be a witness to others regarding Christ, but conversion is the work of the Holy Spirit. The only thing that I found disappointing with this book is the ending. That disappointment would be assuaged if this is only the first book of series. It my sincere hope that this is the intention of the authors.