Common Sense and a Little Fire: Women and Working-Class Politics in the United States, 1900-1965 [NOOK Book]

Overview

Common Sense and a Little Fire traces the personal and public lives of four immigrant women activists who left a lasting imprint on American politics. Though they have rarely had more than cameo appearances in previous histories, Rose Schneiderman, Fannia Cohn, Clara Lemlich Shavelson, and Pauline Newman played important roles in the emergence of organized labor, the New Deal welfare state, adult education, and the modern women's movement. Orleck takes her four subjects from turbulent, turn-of-the-century Eastern...
See more details below
Common Sense and a Little Fire: Women and Working-Class Politics in the United States, 1900-1965

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$19.49
BN.com price
(Save 35%)$29.99 List Price

Overview

Common Sense and a Little Fire traces the personal and public lives of four immigrant women activists who left a lasting imprint on American politics. Though they have rarely had more than cameo appearances in previous histories, Rose Schneiderman, Fannia Cohn, Clara Lemlich Shavelson, and Pauline Newman played important roles in the emergence of organized labor, the New Deal welfare state, adult education, and the modern women's movement. Orleck takes her four subjects from turbulent, turn-of-the-century Eastern Europe to the radical ferment of New York's Lower East Side and the gaslit tenements where young workers studied together. Drawing from the women's writings and speeches, she paints a compelling picture of housewives' food and rent protests, of grim conditions in the garment shops, of factory-floor friendships that laid the basis for a mass uprising of young women garment workers, and of the impassioned rallies working women organized for suffrage. From that era of rebellion, Orleck charts the rise of a distinctly working-class feminism that fueled poor women's activism and shaped government labor, tenant, and consumer policies through the early 1950s.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The life stories of four Jewish immigrant organizersRose Schneiderman, Pauline Newman, Clara Lemlich Shavelson and Fannia Cohnframe Orleck's history of women in U.S. working-class movements. All had energized their communities and garment-factory shop floors, located on New York's Lower East Side, by their early 20s and were lifelong labor leaders. Consummate organizers (Newman conceived and led the largest rent strike New York had ever seen when she was 16), they negotiated the minefields of male labor leaders' sexism, middle- and upper-class feminists' elitism and the country's anti-Semitism and xenophobia to carve out careers, forge friendships and develop a politics Orleck describes as ``industrial feminism.'' Schneiderman's and Newman's most significant intimate relationships were with women. Orleck, an assistant professor of history at Dartmouth and herself the descendant of immigrant Jewish working-class organizers, draws on social history and on primary texts; some of the latter have only recently become accessible to scholars. In the hands of a skilled storyteller, this material would have been gripping, but Orleck's prose is matter-of-fact and often repetitive. Luckily, the rich factual detail and the epic nature of the women's lives sometimes overcome the shortcomings of the writing. Photos not seen by PW. (May)
From the Publisher
Substantially expands our knowledge of twentieth-century working-class women's political activity.

New York History

A major contribution to twentieth-century labor history. . . . Orleck's book is rich in detail and comprehensive in analysis.

Reviews in American History

Highly recommended. Two thumbs up.

International Labor and Working Class History

Orleck's intelligent work reminds readers of a time when workers fought valiantly . . . to be represented by a union.

Choice

An interesting and important study. Common Sense and a Little Fire is worth the read.

Journal of American History

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807863718
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
  • Publication date: 5/22/1995
  • Series: Gender and American Culture
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 400
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Annelise Orleck is associate professor of histoy and women's studies at Dartmouth College. She is author of Soviet Jewish Americans and editor of The Politics of Motherhood: Activist Voices from Left to Right.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction 1
Pt. 1 The Rise of a Working-Class Women's Movement, 1882-1909 13
Prologue. From the Russian Pale to the Lower East Side: The Cultural Roots of Four Jewish Women's Radicalism 15
Ch. 1 Coming of Age: The Shock of the Shops and the Dawning of Political Consciousness, 1900-1909 31
Pt. 2 Working Women in Rebellion: The Emergence of Industrial Feminism, 1909-1920 51
Ch. 2 Audacity: The Uprising of Women Garment Workers, 1909-1915 53
Ch. 3 Common Sense: New York City Working Women and the Struggle for Woman Suffrage 87
Pt. 3 The Activists in Their Prime: The Mainstreaming of Industrial Feminism, 1920-1945 115
Ch. 4 Knocking at the White House Door: Rose Schneiderman, Pauline Newman, and the Campaign for Labor Legislation, 1910-1945 121
Ch. 5 Emotion Strained through a Thinking Mind: Fannia Cohn, the ILGWU, and the Struggle for Workers' Education, 1915-1945 169
Ch. 6 Spark Plugs in Every Neighborhood: Clara Lemlich Shavelson and the Emergence of a Militant Working-Class Housewives' Movement, 1913-1945 215
Pt. 4 The Activists in Old Age: The Twilight of a Movement, 1945-1986 251
Ch. 7 Witnessing the End of an Era: The Postwar Years and the Decline of Industrial Feminism 253
Epilogue. Reflections on Women and Activism 295
Notes 317
Selected Bibliography 359
Index 367
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)