Common Sense in Chess by Emanuel Lasker, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Common Sense in Chess (Illustrated)

Common Sense in Chess (Illustrated)

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by Emanuel Lasker
     
 

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The following is an abstract of Twelve Lectures given before an audience of London chess players. It may be regarded as an attempt to deal with all parts of a game of chess by the aid of general principles. The principles laid down are deduced from considerations concerning the nature of Chess as a fight between two brains, and their conception is based on simple

Overview

The following is an abstract of Twelve Lectures given before an audience of London chess players. It may be regarded as an attempt to deal with all parts of a game of chess by the aid of general principles. The principles laid down are deduced from considerations concerning the nature of Chess as a fight between two brains, and their conception is based on simple facts. Their practical working has been illustrated by positions adapted to the purpose, and likely to occur over the board.

It has been my aim to reduce the different rules in number, as much as was compatible with clearness. They all, it will be found, have a remote likeness, and it would therefore not have been very difficult to reduce their number still more. Indeed they may ultimately be united in one single leading principle, which is the germ of the theory not only of Chess, but of any kind of fight. This principle is sufficiently indicated here, but it is so general in its conception, and the difficulty of expressing the whole compass of its meaning in definite terms so enormous, that I have not ventured to formulate it.

The games and positions given in this book are comparatively few, but they have been selected with care. I therefore would advise the student not to attempt to read the matter only, but to study it and sink some work into it. The rules deduced are, I believe, very plausible. This need not deceive the student, who will see their significance in a clearer light if he tries to be reasonably skeptical and exacting in the matter of proofs. As regards the analytical notes about games or openings, I have tried to be short and to the point.

Analytical detail is therefore not abundant, but I think, reliable. The method of enumerating all the variitions thought possible, or probable, has been laid aside, and in its place an analysis has been given, which makes use of both the consideration of the leading variations and general principles.

Emanuel Lasker (December 24, 1868 – January 11, 1941) was a German chess player, mathematician, and philosopher who was World Chess Champion for 27 years. In his prime Lasker was one of the most dominant champions, and he is still generally regarded as one of the strongest players ever.

His contemporaries used to say that Lasker used a "psychological" approach to the game, and even that he sometimes deliberately played inferior moves to confuse opponents. Recent analysis, however, indicates that he was ahead of his time and used a more flexible approach than his contemporaries, which mystified many of them. Lasker knew the openings well but disagreed with many contemporary analyses. He published chess magazines and five chess books.

Lasker made contributions to the development of other games. He was a first-class contract bridge player and wrote about bridge and other games, including Go and his own invention, Lasca. His books about games presented a problem which is still considered notable in the mathematical analysis of card games. Lasker was also a research mathematician who was known for his contributions to commutative algebra, which included proving the primary decomposition of the ideals of polynomial rings. On the other hand, his philosophical works and a drama that he co-authored received little attention.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940015515268
Publisher:
Balefire Publishing
Publication date:
10/15/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
140
File size:
5 MB

Meet the Author

Emanuel Lasker (December 24, 1868 – January 11, 1941) was a German chess player, mathematician, and philosopher who was World Chess Champion for 27 years. In his prime Lasker was one of the most dominant champions, and he is still generally regarded as one of the strongest players ever.

His contemporaries used to say that Lasker used a "psychological" approach to the game, and even that he sometimes deliberately played inferior moves to confuse opponents. Recent analysis, however, indicates that he was ahead of his time and used a more flexible approach than his contemporaries, which mystified many of them. Lasker knew the openings well but disagreed with many contemporary analyses. He published chess magazines and five chess books.

Lasker made contributions to the development of other games. He was a first-class contract bridge player and wrote about bridge and other games, including Go and his own invention, Lasca. His books about games presented a problem which is still considered notable in the mathematical analysis of card games. Lasker was also a research mathematician who was known for his contributions to commutative algebra, which included proving the primary decomposition of the ideals of polynomial rings. On the other hand, his philosophical works and a drama that he co-authored received little attention.

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Common sense in chess 2.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best chess books I've read. Great book to learn Chess.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another bad ocr of an old book. No spell checking so there are hundreds of errors. Additionally the diagrams of the chessboards are sometimes recognized by the ocr and instead of a picture of a chess board you wind up with a page full of Wiiiisgiwh zsdghiih, etc.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Boring
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow, LAME!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If u like chess this is the book