Communicating Change: Winning Employee Support for New Business Goals

Overview

When a company decides to make a major organizational change whether it's a new emphasis on customer service, quality management, restructuring or downsizing managers must get the message through to front-line employees, and enlist their support...or the changes will create more turmoil than progress.

Written for busy managers at all levels, Communicating Change offers specific prescriptions for ...

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Overview

When a company decides to make a major organizational change whether it's a new emphasis on customer service, quality management, restructuring or downsizing managers must get the message through to front-line employees, and enlist their support...or the changes will create more turmoil than progress.

Written for busy managers at all levels, Communicating Change offers specific prescriptions for effecting successful change centered around three guiding principles:

  • Conveying the message through supervisors
  • Communicating face-to-face
  • Making the changes relevant to each work area

In addition, a variety of helpful forms, checklists, sample communications, and surveys help managers to quickly put these principles into action.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780070364523
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
  • Publication date: 1/1/1994
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 252
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.86 (d)

Meet the Author

McGraw-Hill authors represent the leading experts in their fields and are dedicated to improving the lives, careers, and interests of readers worldwide

McGraw-Hill authors represent the leading experts in their fields and are dedicated to improving the lives, careers, and interests of readers worldwide

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Table of Contents

Part I: Communicate Directly to Supervisors.Target Supervisors.Don't Go Directly to the Front Line.Don't Trickle Down through Middle Management.Middle Managers: Improving Their Communication.Communicating Customer Service.Communicating New Technology.Communicating a Downsizing.Communication Training is Not the Answer.Making Supervisors Number One Priority.Part II: Use Face-to-Face Communication.If It's Not Face-to-Face, It's Not Communication.Video.Briefing Meetings.Company Newspaper.Suggestion Schemes.Employee Attitude Surveys.Putting Your Communication to the Test.Part III: Communicate Relative Performance of Local Work Area.Your Employees Don't Care About the Company.Communicating Quality: Better or Worse Than Competitor's.Communicating Quality: Looking In-House.Communicating Customer Service Performance.Stop Communicating Values.If You're the Boss, Communicate Performance.How to Communicate When Everything is Uncertain.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2005

    Packed with Knowledge !

    Nearly every CEO of a large corporation believes that words directly from his or her mouth will inspire front-line employees. Five decades of research show just the opposite, explain consultants and authors T.J. and Sandar Larkin. Their investigations emphasize the importance of communicating change through low-level supervisors, a group that has more credibility with front-line workers. They maintain that CEOs must go beyond simply telling supervisors what to do; they must also listen to these key employees and empower them by taking their suggestions seriously. The authors provide plenty of real-world examples to bolster their case. We recommend this clearly constructed argument to CEOs and to anyone charged with communicating with large numbers of employees. This engaging treatise, a classic, is ready to persuade its next crop of managers.

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