Communicating Effectively With The Chinese

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Overview

How can North Americans improve their communication with the Chinese? A useful and efficient approach to understanding prevalent cultural assumptions underlying everyday Chinese communicative activities, Communicating Effectively With the Chinese identifies and conceptualizes some of the distinctive communication practices in Chinese culture. Utilizing the self-OTHER perspective as a conceptual foundation, authors Ge Gao and Stella Ting-Toomey portray and interpret the dynamics of Chinese communication. They examine how self-conception, role and hierarchy, relational dynamics, and face affect ways of conducting conversations in Chinese culture. They explain why miscommunication between Chinese and North Americans takes place and suggest ways to improve Chinese/North American communication. By incorporating instances of everyday conversations, Gao and Ting-Toomey offer a realistic and clear illustration of the specific characteristics and functions of Chinese communication, as well as problematic areas of Chinese-North American encounters.

Adding to the sparse literature on communicating with others of different cultural backgrounds, Communicating Effectively With the Chinese is resource that will be widely used by professionals and academics in communication, intercultural communication, interpersonal communication, Asian studies, and race and ethnic studies.

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Editorial Reviews

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To help professionals and academics understand prevalent cultural assumptions underlying everyday Chinese communication, this resource examines how self-conception, role and hierarchy, relational dynamics, and face affect ways of conducting conversations in Chinese culture. Offers explanations of why miscommunication between Chinese and North Americans takes place, and suggests ways to better interact with Chinese. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Stella Ting-Toomey (Ph D, University of Washington) is a professor of human communication at California State University, Fullerton (CSUF). She has published numerous books and over more than 100 articles/chapters on the topics of intercultural conflict competence and ethnic identity negotiation process. A recent book title is Understanding Intercultural Communication, Second Edition (with Leeva Chung; Oxford University Press). Her publications have also appeared in the International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Communication Monographs, Human Communication Research, and The International Journal of Conflict Management, among others. Dr. Ting-Toomey’s teaching passions include intercultural conflict theory and practice and intercultural communication training. She is the 2008 recipient of the 23-campus wide CSU Wang Family Excellence Award, and the 2007–2008 recipient of the CSU-Fullerton Outstanding Professor Award. She has lectured widely throughout the United States, Asia, and Europe on the theme of mindful intercultural conflict competence.

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Table of Contents

Preface
1 Self-OTHER Perspective and Communication 1
Conceptualizing Chinese Culture and Communication 2
Self-OTHER Perspective: Contextualizing Chinese Communication 7
Organization of the Book 19
2 Chinese Personal Relationship Development Processes 23
Gan Qing: The Basis of Chinese Personal Relationships 24
Ren Qing and Bao 29
3 Characteristics of Chinese Communication 35
Han Xu 37
Ting Hua 41
Ke Qi 45
The Insider Effect on Communication 48
4 Mian Zi 53
The Conceptualization of Mian Zi 53
Implications of the Concern for Mian Zi 56
Mian Zi: Face-Directed Communication Strategies 60
5 Miscommunication Between Chinese and North Americans 69
Chinese-North American Communication in a Dilemma 70
What Is Not Said Versus What Is Said 71
We Versus I 73
Polite Versus Impolite Talk 74
Indirect Versus Direct Talk 75
Hesitant Versus Assertive Speech 77
Self-Effacing Versus Self-Enhancing Talk 78
Private Versus Public Personal Questions 81
Reticent Versus Expressive Speech 82
Improving Chinese-North American Communication 83
Epilogue 87
References 95
Index 103
About the Authors 109
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