Communication Realities in a "Post-Racial" Society: What the U.S. Public Really Thinks of President Barack Obama

Overview

This book seeks to go beyond existing public polls regarding Barack Obama, and instead offers a comprehensive treatment of public perceptions that resist mass generalizations based on race, gender, age, political affiliation, or geographical location. Drawing from a large national qualitative data set generated by 333 diverse participants from twelve different states across six U.S. regions, Mark P. Orbe offers a comprehensive look into public perceptions of Barack Obama's communication style, race matters, and ...

See more details below
Paperback (New Edition)
$28.53
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$30.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $16.29   
  • New (4) from $30.74   
  • Used (3) from $16.29   
Communication Realities in a

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$19.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$34.99 List Price

Overview

This book seeks to go beyond existing public polls regarding Barack Obama, and instead offers a comprehensive treatment of public perceptions that resist mass generalizations based on race, gender, age, political affiliation, or geographical location. Drawing from a large national qualitative data set generated by 333 diverse participants from twelve different states across six U.S. regions, Mark P. Orbe offers a comprehensive look into public perceptions of Barack Obama's communication style, race matters, and the role of the media in 21st century politics. Communication Realities in a "Post-Racial" Society: What the U.S. Public Really Thinks about Barack Obama is the first of its kind in that it uses the voices of everyday U.S. Americans to advance our understanding of how identity politics influence public perceptions. The strength of a book such as this one lies within the power of the diverse perspectives of hundreds of participants. Each chapter features extended comments from rural volunteer fire fighters in southern Ohio, African American men in Oakland, CA, religious communities in Alabama; New England senior citizens; military families from southern Virginia; Tea Party members from Nebraska; business and community leaders from North Carolina; individuals currently unemployed and/or underemployed in Connecticut; college students from predominately White, Black, and Hispanic-serving institutions of higher learning; and others. As such, it is the first book that is based on comments from multiple perspectives - something that allows a deeper understanding that hasn't been possible with public polls, media sound bites, and political commentary. It is a must read for scholars interested in contemporary communication in a time when "post-racial" declarations are met with resistance and political junkies who seek an advanced understanding of the peculiarities of rapidly changing political realities.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

CHOICE
Orbe (Western Michigan Univ.) argues that the Obama presidency has forever altered the way communication and diversity are discussed in America, but the discussion is still often about race. His meticulous research reveals how the public's attitudes about President Obama's communication style affect perceptions of his temperament and leadership ability. Orbe's data are drawn from interviews with 300-plus participants from 12 states; one facet of the book that provides great interest—too rare in scholarly efforts—is extensive excerpts from these interviews with a variety of people. At the center of the book are four chapters on the role of race in a "post-racial" society. While conducting his research, rather than asking questions about race he allowed his focus groups to bring up the issue of race independently, an excellent strategy. Orbe argues in his concluding chapter that race continues to make a difference in people's perceptions of Obama, and that a "post-racial" society has not yet eventuated. The work is the latest in the "Lexington Studies in Political Communication" series edited by Robert E. Denton, Jr. Summing Up: Recommended.
Frank Rudy Cooper
This is an important book for anyone who cares about U.S. politics or race. Orbe's thorough research reveals important patterns in people's feelings about President Obama. The book suggests that people may disagree about whether we are or should be post-racial because they disagree about whether we are post-racist. Orbe's book is simultaneously entertaining and thought provoking.
Amardo Rodriguez
Communication Realities compellingly showcases Mark Orbe's scholarly command of these issues, reflecting his distinguished career as a scholar devoted to the study of communication and diversity. Orbe presents findings and insights that deepen our understanding of how people perceive the communication competency and temperament of President Obama, especially in regards to racial issues, and discusses the implications and consequences that attend to these public perceptions. What emerges is a set of realities about race that is complex and nuanced, and will certainly enrich our understanding of race and communication in our ever evolving society.
Catherine R. Squires
Orbe has executed an ambitious project, undertaken with extreme care and attention to the personal and political facets of Obama's impact on people every day. This book sets a tone and a standard for future research, and provides the kind of intimate details we need to get beyond polls and punditry. A must-read for anyone concerned about how we communicate about race in the Obama Era.
Choice
Orbe (Western Michigan Univ.) argues that the Obama presidency has forever altered the way communication and diversity are discussed in America, but the discussion is still often about race. His meticulous research reveals how the public's attitudes about President Obama's communication style affect perceptions of his temperament and leadership ability. Orbe's data are drawn from interviews with 300-plus participants from 12 states; one facet of the book that provides great interest—too rare in scholarly efforts—is extensive excerpts from these interviews with a variety of people. At the center of the book are four chapters on the role of race in a "post-racial" society. While conducting his research, rather than asking questions about race he allowed his focus groups to bring up the issue of race independently, an excellent strategy. Orbe argues in his concluding chapter that race continues to make a difference in people's perceptions of Obama, and that a "post-racial" society has not yet eventuated. The work is the latest in the "Lexington Studies in Political Communication" series edited by Robert E. Denton, Jr. Summing Up: Recommended.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Mark P. Orbe is professor of communication and diversity at Western Michigan University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

I: Introduction
Chapter 1: Barack Obama, Communication, and Race
Chapter 2: Describing the Study
II. Barack Obama as Communicator
Chapter 3: Perceptions of Barack Obama's Communication Style
Chapter 4: Shifts in Perception: The Campaign Versus the Presidency
Chapter 5: "Presidential Communication"
III. Race Matters in a "Post-Racial" Society
Chapter 6: The Role of Race in "Post-Racial" Politics
Chapter 7: Black Pride in, and Allegiance to, President Obama
Chapter 8: White Opposition to President Obama
Chapter 9: Gates/Crowley Conflict and the "Beer Summit"
IV. The Media Machine
Chapter 10: Media Influences
Chapter 11: The Celebrity President
V. Conclusion
Chapter 12: Critical Reflections and Concluding Thoughts

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)