Communications

Communications

by Anthony Wilson
     
 

Examines not only the developments that have brought us such conveniences of the information age as e-mail, cell-phones, and palm-top computers, but also offers valuable insight into a future brimming with amazing possibilities. The full spectrum of communications technology is covered, from Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics to the invention of the printing press, and

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Overview

Examines not only the developments that have brought us such conveniences of the information age as e-mail, cell-phones, and palm-top computers, but also offers valuable insight into a future brimming with amazing possibilities. The full spectrum of communications technology is covered, from Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics to the invention of the printing press, and the origins of today's Internet. Full-color spreads packed with informative captions, look at the past, present, and future of information systems in a variety of fields, including computers, entertainment, education, space, and personal communications. Communications is an ideal gift and a must-have resource for anyone who is curious about the Information Age. Illustrated timelines include major technological milestones and anticipated advances. Comprehensive glossary and index. "Crystal Ball" boxes feature predictions and highlight breakthroughs. "Blurred Vision" graphics show how people in the past envisioned the future. Related resources and websites.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-This attractive volume discusses present-day communications technology and predicts possible developments for the new millennium. Beginning with a time line of the computer and the microprocessor, the book treats readers to a dazzling array of future computer-driven devices such as "smart cards" that allow holders to communicate by radio with the outside world, robots that serve drinks to guests and eventually design better versions of themselves, "knowbots" that filter information coming from the Internet and determine whether its sources are reliable, holographic telephones, virtual spiders, and small flying robots that can be used as security cameras. "Crystal Ball" entries give readers a look into the future of technology while "Blurred Vision" commentaries give a look into the past and some of its failed predictions. A list of several museums and science centers that feature communications displays and a list of Web sites that relate to the future and/or technology are appended. The text is crisp, authoritative, and interesting. However, initially it will be the book's eye-catching design that will grab students' attention.-Linda Wadleigh, Oconee County Middle School, Watkinsville, GA Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
The turn of the millennium has produced an outpouring of literature projecting the future. Some past predictions have been hilariously off the mark. This book is refreshing in that it traces the origins and landmarks of all phases of communications technology and extrapolates only as far as designers and engineers are already developing. The lavish graphic layout and small nuggets of text are aimed at the "juvenile" reader. However, the author never uses a condescending tone, but rather, treats the reader as an adult. This could be a problem for a beginning reader, but a bright eight-year-old found the book well within his ability. As an aid to the reader, the supplements include a glossary, recommended Web sites, and places to visit. Overall, this is an excellent look at the current state of technology and how we got there. (from the How the Future Began Series.) Highly Recommended, Grades 3-8, General Audience. REVIEWER: Dr. Gary A. Griess (University of Texas Health Sciences Center)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780753451793
Publisher:
Kingfisher
Publication date:
09/28/1999
Series:
How the Future Began Series
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
8.85(w) x 11.16(h) x 0.49(d)
Age Range:
10 - 15 Years

Meet the Author

Anthony Wilson was Head of Education at London's Science Museum.

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