Communications Priciples for a Lifetime with Other / Edition 3

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$78.90
(Save 25%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 98%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $65.00   
  • Used (4) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$65.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(114)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

More About This Textbook

Overview

“…this text represents one of the best that I have read.”
~ Cherie Cannon, Miami-Dade College

Communication: Principles for a Lifetime, 3/e helps students see the relationships among various facets of communication by anchoring all discussion around five fundamental principles. Understanding that the challenge in any basic communication course is teaching students the myriad of skills, principles, and theories without overwhelming them, Beebe/Beebe/Ivy emphasize the following five key principles of communication throughout their book:

• Be aware of your communication with yourself and others.
• Effectively use and interpret verbal messages.
• Effectively use and interpret nonverbal messages.
• Listen and respond thoughtfully to others.
• Appropriately adapt messages to others.

New To This Edition

A new emphasis on communication skills is linked with the trademark communication principles theme in the new end-of-chapter feature called “Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills.” A related figure, the Principles Pentagon, inside the front cover reinforces the theme.
New and expanded coverage of technology and communication throughout looks at ways technology influences the way we communicate with others. Also, a new appendix features a discussion of mediated communication.
A new emphasis on ethical communication includes expanded coverage in Chapter 6 and a newly revised interactive ethics feature, “Ethics and Communication.” This feature allows students to consider ethical scenarios and answer questions that reveal their own ethical views.
A new feature in the Presentational Speaking section, “Developing Your Presentation Step by Step,” illustrates one student’s path through speech creation and delivery.

[MySpeechLab Ad]

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205508938
  • Publisher: Allyn & Bacon, Inc.
  • Publication date: 1/28/2006
  • Series: MySpeechLab Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 512
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

I. PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATION

1. Foundations of Human Communication.

Communication Defined.

Communication Competence

The Message Should Be Understood

The Message Should Achieve Its Intended Effect

The Message Should Be Ethical

Ethics and Communication: What Are Your Sources of Ethical Influence?

Why Study Communication?

To Improve Your Employability

To Improve Your Relationships

To Improve Your Health

On the Web

Communication Models.

Communication as Action: Message Transfer

Communication as Interaction: Message Exchange

Communication as Transaction: Message Creation

Communication Characteristics.

Communication Is Inescapable

Communication Is Irreversible

Communication Is Complicated

Communication Emphasizes Content and Relationships

Communication Is Governed By Rules

Communication Principles for a Lifetime.

Principle One: Be Aware of Your Communication with Yourself and Others

Principle Two; Effectively Use and Interpret Verbal Messages

Principle Three: Effectively Use and Interpret Nonverbal Messages

Principle Four: Listen and Respond Thoughtfully to Others

Principle Five: Appropriately Adapt Messages to Others

Diversity and Communication: Principles for a Lifetime: Principles for All Cultures

Communicating with Others: Three Situations.

Impersonal Communication

Group Communication

Presentational Communication

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

2. Self-Awareness and Communication.

Self-Awareness: How Well Do You Know Yourself?

Self-Concept: Who Are You?

Self-Concept Components

One or Many Selves?

How the Self-Concept Develops

Technology and Communication: Exploring Self-Concept through Computer-Mediated Communication

Ethics and Communication: Cyber Selves

Self-Esteem: What Is Your Value?

Diversity and Communication: Self-Esteem and Ethnicity

Communication and the Enhancement of Self-Esteem.

Engage in Positive Self-Talk

Visualize

Reframe

Develop Honest Relationships

Surround Yourself with Positive people

Lose Your Baggage

The Perception Process.

Stage One: Attention and Selection

Stage Two: Organization

Stage Three: Interpretation

Communication and the Enhancement of Perceptual Accuracy.

Increase Your Awareness

Avoid Stereotypes

Check Your Perceptions

On the Web

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

3. Understanding Verbal Messages.

Why Focus on Language?

The Nature of Language.

People Use Words as Symbols

People Attach Meaning to Words

People Create Denotative and Connotative Meanings for Words

People Convey Concrete and Abstract Meanings through Words

Meanings Are Culture Bound

Meanings Are Context Bound

Diversity and Communication: Words across the Country

The Power of Words.

The Power to Create and Label Experience

The Power to Impact Thoughts and Actions

The Power to Shape and Reflect Culture

The Power to Make and Break Relationships

Technology and Communication: Minding Your Manners, Even on the Net.

Confronting Bias in Language

Biased Language: Race, Ethnicity, Nationality, and Religion

Biased Language: Gender and Sexual Orientation

Biased Language: Age, Class, and Ability

On the Web

Using Words to Establish Supportive Relationships.

Describe Your Own Feelings Rather Than Evaluate Others

Solve Problems Rather Than Control Others

Be Genuine Rather Than Manipulative

Empathize Rather Than Remain Detached from Others

Be Flexible Rather Than Rigid toward Others

Present Yourself as Equal Rather Than Superior

Avoid Gunny-Sacking

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

4. Understanding Nonverbal Messages.

Why Focus on Nonverbal Communication?

Nonverbal Messages Communicate Feelings and Attitudes

Nonverbal Messages Are More Believable that Verbal

Nonverbal Messages Are Critical to Successful Relationships

Nonverbal Messages Serve Various Functions for Verbal Messages

Technology and Communication: Conveying Emotions Online

The Nature of Nonverbal Communication.

The Culture-Bound Nature of Nonverbal Communication.

The Rule-Governed Nature of Nonverbal Communication

The Ambiguous Nature of Nonverbal Communication

The Continuous Nature of Nonverbal Communication

The Nonlinguistic Nature of Nonverbal Communication

The Multichanneled Nature of Nonverbal Communication

Codes of Nonverbal Communication.

Appearance

Body Movement, Gestures, and Posture

Eye Contact

Facial Expressions

Touch

The Voice

Environment, Space and Territory

Ethics and Communication: Lie Detectors

On the Web

Diversity and Communication: Cultural Meanings of Silence

How to Interpret Nonverbal Cues More Accurately.

Immediacy

Arousal

Dominance

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

5. Listening and Responding.

How We Listen.

Selecting

Attending

Understanding

Remembering

Responding

Listening Styles

People-Oriented Listening Style

Action-Oriented Listening Style

Content-Oriented Listeners

Time-Oriented Listeners

Adapting to Your Listening Style

Diversity and Communication: East and West Listening Styles

Listening Barriers.

Self-Barriers

Information-Processing Barriers

Context Barriers

Improving Your Listening Skills.

Stop: Turn Off Competing Messages

Look: Listen with Your Eyes

Listen: Understand Both Details and major Ideas

Diversity and Communication: Who Are Better Listeners, Men or Women?

Responding Skills.

Be Descriptive

Be Timely

Be Brief

Be Useful

Responding with Empathy.

Understand Your Partner’s Feelings

Ask Appropriate Questions

Paraphrase Message Content

Paraphrase Emotions

Ethics and Communication: Honest Listening

Technology and Communication: Can Computers Listen Empathically?

On the Web

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

6. Adapting to Others: Bridging Culture and Gender Differences.

Ethically Adapt Your Communication to Others

Culture and Communication.

Defining Culture

Cultural Contexts

Cultural Values

Decentralized and Centralized Approaches to Power and Cultural Values

Diversity and Communication: Diversity Almanac

Technology and Communication: Adapting to Cultural Differences When Communicating Virtually

On the Web

Gender and Communication.

The Importance of Gender in Culture

Why Women and Men Communicate Versus How

Barriers to Bridging Differences and Adapting to Others.

Assuming Superiority

Assuming Similarity

Assuming Differences

Stereotyping and Prejudice

Different Communication Codes

Ethics and Communication: Stereotyping Others

Adapting to Others Who Are Different from You.

Seek Information

Listen and Ask Questions

Tolerate Ambiguity

Develop Mindfulness

Become Other-Oriented

Adapt to Others

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

II. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION.

7. Understanding Interpersonal Communication.

What Is Interpersonal Communication?

Interpersonal Communication Involves Quality

Interpersonal Communication Involves Mutual Influence

Interpersonal Communication Helps manage Relationships

Initiating Relationships

Interpersonal Attraction: Why We Like Whom We Like

Communicating Our Attraction

Getting That First Conversation Going

Ethics and Communication: The Harmless Crush?

Diversity and Communication: What Attracts You?

On the Web

Technology and Communication: Gender and Online Communication

Maintaining Relationships

Self-Disclosure: Revealing Yourself to Others

Two Models of Self-Disclosure

Expressing Emotions

On the Web

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

8. Enhancing Relationships.

The Importance of Friendship

Communication Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Friendships

The Importance of Family

Communication Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Family Relationships

The Importance of Colleagues

Communication Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Workplace Relationships

Stages of Relationship Development

Relational Escalation

Relational De-Escalation

Ethics and Communication: Making Breaking Up Easier to Do?

Managing Interpersonal Conflict

A World of Conflict

How Conflict Functions in Relationships

Styles of Managing Conflict

Conflict Management Skills

Technology and Communication: Cheating in Cyberspace

Diversity and Communication: Conflict and Culture

On the Web

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

III. COMMUNICATING IN GROUPS AND TEAMS.

9. Understanding Group and Team Performance.

Groups and Teams Defined.

Communicating in Small Groups

Communicating in Teams

On the Web

Ethics and Communication: Ethically Achieving a Team Goal

Understanding Types of Groups and Teams.

Primary Groups

Study Groups

Therapy Groups

Problem-Solving Groups

Focus Groups

Social Groups

Technology and Communication: Does Virtual Group Communication Improve Decision Making?

Understanding Group and Team Dynamics.

Roles

Rules

Norms

Status

Power

Cohesiveness

Communication Interaction Patterns

Understanding Group and Team Phases of Development.

Orientation

Conflict

Emergence

Reinforcement

The Process Nature of Group Phases

On the Web

Diversity and Communication: The Impact of Individualism and Collectivism on Groups and Teams

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

10. Enhancing Group and Team Performance.

What Effective Group Members Do.

Identify and Implement Key Functions to Achieve Results

Identify and Clear, Elevating Goal

Gather and Use Information Effectively

Develop a Results-Driven Structure

Develop Options

Evaluate Ideas

Develop Sensitivity toward Others

When Not to Work in Groups

Structuring Group and Team Problem Solving.

Step 1: Identify and Define the Problem

Step 2: Analyze the Problem

Step 3: Generate Creative Solutions

Step 4: Select the Best Solution

Step 5: Take Action

Technology and Communication: Brainstorming

Ethics and Communication: Managing Conflict in Groups and Teams

Enhancing Team Leadership.

Trait Approach

Functional Approach

Styles Approach

Situational Approach

Transformational Leadership

Diversity and Communication: Differences in Use of Time in Groups and Teams

Enhancing Group and Team Meetings.

Manage Meeting Structure

Manage Meeting Interaction

On the Web

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

IV. PRESENTATIONAL SPEAKING.

11. Developing Your Presentation.

An Overview of the Presentational Speaking Process.

Developing Your Presentation Step by Step: Consider Your Audience

Understanding Speaker Anxiety.

Managing Speaker Anxiety.

Know How to Develop a Presentation

Be Prepared

Focus on Your Audience

Focus on Your Message

Give Yourself a Mental Pep Talk

Use Deep-Breathing Techniques

Take Advantage of Opportunities to Speak

Seek Available Professional Help

Selecting and Narrowing Your Topic.

Who Is the Audience?

What Is the Occasion?

What Are My Interests and Experiences?

Silent Brainstorming

Scanning Web Directories and Web Pages

Listening and Reading for Topic Ideas

On the Web

Developing Your Presentation Step by Step: Select and Narrow Your Topic

Identifying Your Purpose.

General Purpose

Specific Purpose

Developing Your Central Idea.

Audience Centered

A Single Topic

A Compete Declarative Sentence

Direct, Specific Language

Developing Your Presentation Step by Step: Determine Your Purpose

Developing Your Presentation Step by Step: Develop Your Central Idea

Generating Main Ideas.

Does the Central Idea Have Logical Divisions?

Can You Think of Several Reasons the Central Idea Is True?

Can You Support the Central Idea with a Series of Steps or a Chronological Sequence?

Developing Your Presentation Step by Step: Determine Your Main Ideas

Gathering Supporting Material.

Sources of Supporting Material

Types of Supporting Material

Acknowledgement of Supporting Material

Technology and Communication: A New Kind of Search Engine

Ethics and Communication: The Question of Speechwriting

Developing Your Presentation Step by Step: Gather Supporting Material

Diversity and Communication: Adapting to Diverse Audiences

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

12. Organizing and Outlining Your Presentation.

Organizing Your Main Ideas.

Organizing Ideas Chronologically

Organizing Ideas Topically

Organizing Ideas Spatially

Organizing Ideas to Show Cause and Effect

Organizing Ideas by Problem and Solution

Organizing Your Supporting Material.

Diversity and Communication: Acknowledging Cultural Differences in Organizing Messages

Developing Your Presentation Step by Step: Organize Your Speech

Organizing Your Presentation for the Ears of Others.

Previews

Verbal and Nonverbal Transitions

Summaries

Ethics and Communication: The Ethics of Primacy and Recency

Introducing and Concluding Your Presentation.

Introductions

Conclusions

On the Web

Outlining Your Presentation.

Preparation Outline

Delivery Outline

Technology and Communication: Using Outlining Software

A Sample Preparation Outline

A Sample Delivery Outline

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

13. Delivering Your Presentation.

Methods of Delivery.

Manuscript Speaking

Memorized Speaking

Impromptu Speaking

Extemporaneous Speaking

Effective Verbal Delivery.

Using Words Well

Creating Memorable Word Structures

Effective Nonverbal Delivery.

Eye Contact

Physical Delivery

Facial Expression

Vocal Delivery

Appearance

Diversity and Communication: The Academic Quarter

On the Web:

Developing Your Presentation Step by Step: Rehearse Your Presentation

Technology and Communication: Rehearsing on Videotape

Effective Presentation Aids.

Types of Presentation Aids

Computer-Generated Presentation Aids

Guidelines for Preparing Presentation Aids

Guidelines for Using Presentation Aids

Ethics and Communication: Profanity in an Audio Presentation Aid

Some Final Tips for Rehearsing and Delivering Your Presentation.

Developing Your Presentation Step by Step: Deliver Your Presentation

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

14. Speaking to Inform.

Types of Informative Presentations.

Presentations about Objects

Presentations about Procedures

Presentations about People

Presentations about Events

Presentations about Ideas

Ethics and Communication: Confidential or Potentially Subversive Information

Strategies for Organizing Your Informative Presentation

Organizing Presentations about Objects

Organizing Presentations about Procedures

Organizing Presentations about People

Organizing Presentations about Events

Organizing Presentations about Ideas

Strategies for Making Your Informative Presentation Clear.

Simplify Ideas

Pace Your Information Flow

Relate New Information to Old

Diversity and Communication: Using an Interpreter

Strategies for Making Your Informative Speech Interesting.

Relate to Your Listener’s Interests

Use Attention-Catching Supporting Material

Establish a Motive for Your Audience to Listen to You

Use Word Pictures

Creat Intersting Presentation Aids

Use Humor

On the Web

Technology and Communication: Using an Electronic Thesaurus

Strategies for Making Your Presentation Memorable.

Build in Redundancy

Use Adult Learning Principles

Reinforce Key Ideas Verbally

Reinforce Key Ideas Nonverbally

Sample Informative Presentation: “Who Could Ask for Anything More?”

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

15. Speaking to Persuade.

Persuasion Defined.

Ethics and Communication: Hidden Agendas

Motivating Your Audience: The Psychology of Persuasion.

Motivating with Dissonance

Motivating with Needs

Motivating with Fear Appeals

Motivating wit Positive Appeals

Selecting and Narrowing Your Persuasive Topic.

Identifying Your Persuasive Purpose.

Developing Your Central Idea as a Persuasive Proposition.

Propositions of Fact

Propositions of Value

Propositions of Policy

Supporting Your Presentation with Credibility, Logic, and Emotion: Strategies for Persuading Your Audience.

Ethos: Establishing Your Credibility

Logos: Using Evidence and Reasoning

Pathos: Using Emotion

Diversity and Communication: “Elementary Reasoning, My Dear Watson”.

Organizing Your Persuasive Message

Problem and Solution

Cause and Effect

Refutation

The Motivate Sequence

Technology and Communication: The Motivated Sequence in Television Advertising

How to Adapt Ideas to People and People to Ideas.

The Receptive Audience

The Neutral Audience

The Unreceptive Audience

A Sample Persuasive Presentation: Cruisin’ Out of Control

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Discussion and Review

Putting Principles into Practice

Appendix A. Interviewing.

The Nature and Types of Interviews

Information-Gathering Interview

Appraisal Interview

Problem-Solving Interview

Persuasion Interview

Job Interview

Interview Structure

The Opening

The Body: Asking Questions

Questioning Sequences

The Conclusion

How to Be Interviewed for a Job

Be Aware of Your Skill and Abilities

Prepare Your Resumé

Technology and Communication: Tips for E-Resumés

Identify the Needs of Your Employer

Listen, Respond, and Ask Appropriate Questions

Follow Up after the Interview

How to Be Interviewed for an Information-Gathering Interview

Prepare for the Interview

Listen Effectively

Respond Appropriately

On the Web

The Responsibilities of the Interviewer

Be Aware of Biases and Prejudices

Adapt to an Interviewee’s behavior

Deal Wisely with Sensitive Content

Listen Effectively

Record Information

Ask Appropriate Questions

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Appendix B: Communication and Technology.

Technology and Interpersonal Communication

An Impersonal Technological Innovation

The Role of Technology in Relationship Initiation

The Role of Technology in Relationship Maintenance

Technology and Group Communication

The Technological Formation of Small Groups

Teleconferencing

The Effects of Technology on Group Interaction

Source Material for Presentations

Technological Innovations and Presentation Aids

Technology and Enhanced Speech Delivery

Summary

Principles for a Lifetime: Enhancing Your Skills

Appendix C. Sample Speeches for Discussion and Evaluation.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)