Communion: Contemporary Writers Reveal the Bible in Their Lives

Overview

The authors in Communion, largely of Christian background, approach the Bible not primarily as a religious text, but as literary, imaginative, and cultural bedrock. By comparing their first exposure to the Bible as children, as many of the authors do, with an exploration of what the Bible means to them and to their work today, the authors reveal the concussion and reverberation of the larger Judeo-Christian, American culture on our private lives. In reexamining specific books of the Hebrew Bible and New Testament...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (24) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $50.00   
  • Used (23) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$50.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

The authors in Communion, largely of Christian background, approach the Bible not primarily as a religious text, but as literary, imaginative, and cultural bedrock. By comparing their first exposure to the Bible as children, as many of the authors do, with an exploration of what the Bible means to them and to their work today, the authors reveal the concussion and reverberation of the larger Judeo-Christian, American culture on our private lives. In reexamining specific books of the Hebrew Bible and New Testament in such a personal way, the writers, essayists, and poets in Communion illuminate the text with their lives, bringing their counterparts among the Biblical authors to life as well. Such a rereading allows them to reinvigorate the Bible with new meaning, and to better reveal how the Bible has shaped and altered their thought.

In an inspiring collection of provocative, intellectually probing, and surprisingly personal original essays, some of our most gifted contemporary writers from Christian backgrounds explore how the Old and New Testaments have affected their ideas, their work, and their lives.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
What difference does reading the Bible make in contemporary culture? Are biblical texts to be read as mere devotional tracts? Or do these texts have a more pervasive, though less visible, influence, shaping our lives, our attitudes and even our writing in mysterious ways? David Rosenberg (A Poet's Bible, 1992) gathers the voices of 40 well-known writers as they examine the effects that reading the Bible has had on their writing. Novelist Valerie Sayers contemplates the ways in which the Genesis story of Rebecca and the Lukan narrative of Mary and Martha have woven their stories into her stories about women in the modern South. Joyce Carol Oates, in a wickedly ironic piece, explores the Garden of Eden expulsions and the story in John of the woman taken in adultery. Helen Vendler crafts a small masterpiece on the manner in which the rhythms and themes of the Psalms and John, in particular, are integrated into our own experiences. But this collection is notable more for what is missing than for what is included. Where is the rich and gracious voice of Reynolds Price, for whom the biblical narratives, especially the gospels, are insistently woven into both his life and his writings? Where are John Updike's dyspeptic ruminations on things biblical, Clyde Edgerton's rollicking biblical comedy? (Mar.)
Kirkus Reviews
A generally strained anthology, with several memorable individual essays.

Poet and translator Rosenberg (Testimony, 1989; The Book of J, edited by Harold Bloom) has once again assembled a compendium of writers' essays on a single topic, in this case personal reflections on the Bible, often going back to childhood. Most of the writers are from Christian backgrounds, though most now approach the tradition with a healthy skepticism, and a few, like Catherine Texier, with "a fresh rage." The most intriguing contributions demonstrate how some writers have felt compelled to employ biblical models in their adult writing. Valerie Sayers, for instance, observing the matriarch Rebecca's bitterness and conniving strength, casts her in a contemporary novel. Several other creative essays trace common narrative threads through two seemingly disparate biblical books; Kathleen Norris uses both Jeremiah and Revelation to demonstrate how the poetry of apocalyptic literature is lost when the Bible is no longer read aloud. And slightly off the beaten track, Terry Tempest Williams discusses her reconciliation with her Utah childhood and the Book of Mormon in a convincing rite-of-passage essay. But all too many of the pieces fail to illuminate the biblical text: John Barth makes a confusing foray into the physics of creation; Elizabeth Hardwick's essay on the life of Jesus is afflicted with the very banality she fears will taint any attempt to write one's thoughts on the much-interpreted Bible. Readers are also advised to skip Rosenberg's pompous introduction, whose basic premise is that the Bible has been monopolized for too long by tweedy academics and needs at last to be understood on a personal level. The book's contrived division into three untitled parts leaves the reader wondering about Rosenberg's careless organization.

With this anthology topping out at 560 pages, Rosenberg could have been more discriminating in his selections and their presentation.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385474849
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/17/1997
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 560
  • Product dimensions: 5.22 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 1.35 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: A New Revelation 1
Psalms 13
Numbers 29
Genesis (Rebecca) and Luke 39
Ezekiel 49
Genesis and Matthew 61
Jonah and Gospels 75
Genesis (Hagar) 89
Ruth 103
Revelation 115
Genesis (Jacob) and Luke 123
Gospels 133
Job 151
Epistle to the Hebrews 163
Daniel 177
Genesis, Jeremiah, & Gospels 187
Genesis (Esau) 207
Psalms and Gospels 223
Genesis (Eden) and John 253
Ecclesiastes 271
Jeremiah and Revelation 281
Habakkuk and Romans 299
Gospels 311
Amos and James 323
Nehemiah and Matthew 343
Book of Mormon and Isaiah 357
Job and Matthew 367
Psalms and John 381
Deuteronomy and John 393
Song of Solomon 417
Isaiah, John, and Luke 435
Genesis (Eden) 451
Jeremiah and Corinthians 467
Genesis (Abraham) and Gospels 479
Matthew 493
Genesis, Psalms, and Gospels 513
Genesis and Revelation 527
Author Biographies 541
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)