Communion: A True Story

Overview

Thus begins the most astonishing true-life odyssey ever recorded—one man's riveting account of his extraordinary experiences with visitors from “elsewhere” . . . how they found him, where they took him, what they did to him, and why.

Believe it. Or don't believe it. But read it—for this gripping story will move you like no other. It will fascinate you, terrify you, and alter the way you experience your world.

Communion is a 25-week...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$10.61
BN.com price
(Save 24%)$13.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (22) from $2.86   
  • New (12) from $5.08   
  • Used (10) from $2.86   
Sending request ...

Overview

Thus begins the most astonishing true-life odyssey ever recorded—one man's riveting account of his extraordinary experiences with visitors from “elsewhere” . . . how they found him, where they took him, what they did to him, and why.

Believe it. Or don't believe it. But read it—for this gripping story will move you like no other. It will fascinate you, terrify you, and alter the way you experience your world.

Communion is a 25-week New York Times bestseller--one man's riveting account of his experience with visitors from "elsewhere": how they found him, where they took him, what they did to him. Strieber's astounding tale utterly claims the reader's attention--because it actually occurred.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
In the mid-1980s, Whitley Strieber wrote Communion: A True Story, an account of his disturbing personal encounter with strange-looking nonhumans he called "The Visitors." When published in 1986, the book became a bestseller, topping nonfiction lists nationwide. Its gripping story and vivid writing have also made it a favorite source for science fiction writers and filmmakers. This edition of the classic alien abduction story carries a new foreword by Strieber.
New York Tribune
“Vividness of detail and depth of feeling...Convincing!”
Boston Herald
“Strieber comes through as both sensible and sincere...His book deserves to be taken seriously.”
Houston Chronicle
“A convincing case.”
Vermont Sunday Magazine
“Patently honest...There is no doubt this man has endured experiences of compelling realism.”
Seattle Times
“Powerful...Strieber’s storytelling ability makes his own terror and confusion feel real to the reader...Compelling reading.”
Dow Jones News
“Should give second thoughts to even the most hardened skeptic!”
Detroit News
“A fascinating story...And it certainly could be true.”
New York Times
“Powerfully written and involving!”
Rocky Mountain News
“...COMMUNION is surely the most throught-provoking book on UFOs and alien visitation published so far.”
School Library Journal
YA Strieber has a reputation for writing well-researched nonfiction. Were it not for this reputation, readers would be more tempted to dismiss as fantasy this account of visits he has received from a non-human group. In the winter of 198586, the visits became both more frequent and more visible. Strieber sought the help of a counselor/hypnotist, who did not accept the alien hypothesis. Eventually Strieber's wife was also hypnotized. The accounts both Striebers gave under hypnosis and the memories that surfaced after hynosis, as well as several witnesses to aspects of the visitations all corroborate that something abnormal occurred. Strieber is careful not to jump to any conclusions; in fact, he philosophizes at length about the possibilities which include aliens, an as yet unidentified aspect of the human mind, or some generally invisible earth inhabitant such as fairies. The book is fascinating as long as it sticks to the basic account, and the ways in which the Striebers chose to research the phenomena. The passages of hypothesizing are more longwinded and will be of less interest to young adults, but they do remind readers that the Striebers have not accepted a single answer to the puzzle even now. Any readers who have interest in the unexplained will appreciate this book. Dorcas Hand, Episcopal High School, Bellaire
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061474187
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/2/2008
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 224,474
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Whitley Strieber

Whitley Strieber is the bestselling author of the horror novels The Wolfen and The Hunger, and this memoir, Communion—all of which were made into feature films. His books The Grays and 2012: The War for Souls are both being made into films, and his Web site, unknowncountry.com, is the largest of its kind in the world. Strieber was born and raised in San Antonio, Texas.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

December 26, 1985

My wife and I own a log cabin in a secluded corner of upstate New York. It is in this cabin that our primary experiences have taken place. I will deal first with what I remember of December 26, 1985, and then with what was subsequently jogged into memory concerning October 4, 1985. Until I sought help, I remembered only that there was a strange disturbance on October 4. An interviewer asked if I could recall any other unusual experiences in my past. The night of October 4 had also been one of turmoil, but it took discussions with the other people who had been in the cabin at the time to help me reconstruct it.

This part of my narrative, covering December 26, is derived from journal material I had written before undergoing any hypnosis or even discussing my situation with anybody.

When I was alone, this is what it was like.

Our cabin is very hidden and quiet, part of a small group of cabins scattered across an area served by a private dirt road, which itself branches off a little-used country road that leads to an old town that isn't even mentioned on many maps. We spend more than half of our time at the cabin, because I do most of my work there. We also have an apartment in New York City.

Ours is a very sedate life. We don't go out much, we rarely drink more than wine, and neither of us has ever used drugs. From 1977 until 1983 1 wrote imaginative thrillers, but in recent years I had been concentrating on much more serious fiction about peace and the environment, books that were firmly grounded in fact. Thus, at this time in my life, I wasn't even working on horror stories, and at no time had I everbeen in danger of being deluded by them.

We were having a lovely Christmas at the cabin in late December 1985. On Christmas Eve there was snow, which continued for two more days. My son had discovered to his delight that the snow would fall in perfect crystalline flakes on his gloves if he stood still with his hands out.

On December 26 we spent a happy morning breaking in his new sled, then went cross-country skiing in the afternoon. For supper we had leftover Christmas goose, cranberry sauce, and cold sweet potatoes. We drank seltzer with fresh lime in it. After our son went to bed, Anne and I sat quietly together listening to some music and reading.

At about eight-thirty I turned on the bur I alarm, which covers every accessible window an all the doors. For no reason then apparent, I haddeveloped an unusual habit the previous fall. As secretly as ever I made a tour of the house, peering in closets and even looking under the guest-room bed for hidden intruders. I did this immediately after setting the alarm. By ten o'clock we were in bed, and eleven both of us were asleep.

The night of the twenty-sixth was cold and cloudy. There were perhaps eight inches of snow on the ground, and it was still falling lightly.

I do not recall any dreams or disturbances at all. There was apparently a large unknown object seen in the immediate vicinity at approximately this time of month, but a report of it would not be published for another week. Even when I read that report, though, I did not relate it in any way to my experience. Why should I? The report attributed the sightings to a practical joke. Only much later, when I researched it myself, did I discover how inaccurate that report was.

I have never seen an unidentified flying object. I thought that the whole subject had been explained by science. It took me a couple of months to establish the connection between what had happened to me and possible nonhuman visitors, so unlikely did such a connection seem.

In the middle of the night of December 26 -- 1 do not know the exact time -- I abruptly found myself awake. And I knew why: I heard a peculiar whooshing, swirling noise coming from the living room downstairs. This was no random creak, no settling of the house, but a sound as if a large number of people were moving rapidly around in the room.

I listened carefully. The noise just didn't make sense. I sat up in bed, shocked and very curious. There was an edge of fear. The night was dead still, windless. My eyes went, straight to the burglar-alarm panel beside the bed. The system was armed and working perfectly. Not a covered window or door was opened, and nobody had entered -- at least according to the row of glowing lights.

What I did next may seem peculiar. I settled back in bed. For some reason the extreme strangeness of what I was hearing did not rouse me to action. Over the course of this narrative this sort of inappropriate response will be repeated many times. If something is strange enough, the reaction is very different from what one would think. The mind seems to tune it out as if by some sort of instinct.

No sooner had I settled back than I noticed that one of the double doors leading into our bedroom was moving closed. As they close outward, this meant that the opening was getting smaller, concealing whatever was behind that door. I sat. up again. My mind was sharp. I was not asleep, nor in ahypnopompic state between sleep and waking. I wish to be clear that I felt, at that moment, wide awake and in full possession of all my faculties. I could easily have gotten up and read a book or listened to the radio or gone for a midnight walk in the snow.

I could not imagine what could be going on, and I got very uneasy.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 13, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A very deep, philosopohical read.

    Just like the reviews say, Communion is a powerful read that will change the way you experience your world. Personally, I believe Strieber's account to be true, I'm not sure why, I just do. His words show me that he is very sensable, intelligent, and sane. His story could definately be a true one.
    I have to admit, at first I was a bit scared of it. I got it as a christmas gift. I disliked the title, the cover, everything. I guess I wasn't expecting a true story, I asked for a book with pictures of ufos (oi, silly mother! ^^) because I'm interested in them. Even if they aren't real; even if someone just took a photo of some lights or a hubcap flying in the air, It still facinates me. It always has. I guess you could say Whitely really opened my eyes and (no pun intended) made me see the light.
    I recommend this book to people who believe in extraterrestrials and/or abductions. I would also recommend it to people who aren't sure what's out there and possibly want or are interested in knowing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2006

    Communion

    I think the book is incredible, but that part where he recallls the guy who attacked Mr. Strieber.That is so un-realistic.The book is throughly good. I enjoyed it. It was a great book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2006

    Will make anyone think twice.

    I've long been interested in UFO's and 'aliens,' so when I saw this book, I snatched it right off the shelf. It was an amazing read from beginning to finish - packed with chilling experiences and supporting evidence. At times I had to force myself to put in down just to sleep.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2005

    great

    This book is a reminder that the Human race is not alone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2003

    A harrific true abduction story: Communion

    This story gave me 'the chills' when I started reading it. It is so interesting that you can't stop reading it. This story made changes in my life on meditating about 'ALIENS'.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2001

    Surprisingly Eerie

    A very detailed look into the life of a real abductee. He keeps an open mind, and isn't trying to convince anyone. Some can't finish the book because of related experiences, while others seek comfort to know that they're not the only ones. A great and educational look into the life of an abductee.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2000

    An unbeliveable real life account of abduction

    This book was a life altering experience. It makes you stop and think, and question your existence. If more people would read this book, then people would be more open to such events that are reported.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2000

    Strieber's Communion: our 'ancient future'

    This is a brief review based on a single reading of Whitley Striber's book: Communion. My intention is not to write a thorough review, but just to jot down a few initial impressions of my own. IT IS CLEAR that the author has had a series of harrowing experiences. He had to 'work through' those, amidst serious doubts about how real they were, how 'sane' he is and have managed to remain, and most importantly: how and to what extent he has managed to learn to live with it. STRIEBER supports his claims about human-alien contact in various ways: - these experiences were personal (i.e., not simply reporting the experiences of others), and thus subjectively true - he has attempted in various ways to get rid of it, as well as his memories, and also to protect his family: e.g., by moving away to a new location every so often; searching himself and subjecting himself to various outside experts for questioning; and investigating a variety of other possibilities as to explain the meaning and sense of his experiences. - he has received confirmation from those close to him that his experiences were very real; and that it could not have been the result of his own mind playing tricks on him, etc. - his experiences have been corroborated by others whom have had similar experiences; and often with astonishing similarities of perception, feeling and reaction. Strieber's presentation - and I have not read any of his later books - should be taken seriously, and I list some reasons below: FIRSTLY: In looking for explanations, Strieber does, however, take for granted a certain paradigm of scientific thinking, which came fashionable hundreds of years ago, and which is largely still a 'fabrication' (though an important and not utterly invalid one) of the scientific method: namely, that confirming evidence needs to be collected to such an extent that the weight of the evidence supports a specific conclusion as the most PROBABLE (likely). This is the best that science can come up with, which means that science itself can, in principle, NEVER claim to know anything absolutely. This is corroborated by even a cursory look at the foundations of scientific logic, and is also held by virtually every leading scientist from the previous century (Einstein, Bohr, Planck, etc.). The insight that this provides is that the typicaly 'debunking' argument of the 'debunker scientist' is based upon what they do not know, or do not want to know. This is simply committing the fallacy of the argument from ignorance (something is accepted as true simply because it has not been 'conclusively verified' that the opposite is the case). In the science of probabilities the notion of 'conclusive verification' is self-contradictory. SECONDLY: Contrary to the view of how science proceeds to obtain knowledge through the accummulation of heaps of verifying evidence, is another line of approach which argues exactly the opposite: developed by the philosopher of science, Karl Popper. It reads that scientific knowledge proceeds far better when the scientist actually looks for evidence to contradict (falsify) his/her initial hypothesis. Such falsifying data is then used to further adapt and qualify the existing body of knowledge; and in that way push back the 'frontiers of ignorance' - rather than 'expand the limits of knowledge'. For Strieber's argument - and all those who write about this phenomenon - this simply means that even if there are only 'pieces' or fragments of data, the existence and reality of those pose a veritable challenge to the accepted (official???) body of scientific knowledge - if indeed there is such a 'thing' at all. THIRDLY: re. the question of the nature of 'fact' versus 'fiction': in philosophy today - esp. since a philosopher like Nietzsche came to be recognized as one of the most importnat thinkers in our time - having esp. made a tremendous impact on 'post-modernist thinking (so-called): there can be no doubt that philosophy, j

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 15, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Polygraph near the end to prove he wasnt lying!

    after all the crazy claims these days, whitley still remains one of th eonly credible sources concerning the "visitors" (he doesnt call them aliens) and boy should we listen.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Pretty Good in a creepy kind of way.

    This book was different than others that I've read. I have always been of a believer of Aliens, this story, whether you choose to believe it or not, will give you an abduction experience from an Authors perspective. While reading it, i felt as if i was being watched. The stories Whitley retells through Hypnosis were really freaky. I reccomend this book to those who want a little scare and to those who are believers of E.T.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2001

    From Skepticism to Comprehension

    This book is written in almost novel style at the beginning, which led me to become suspicious that it was nothing more than an elaborate dream, further enhanced by the author's obviously excellent writing abilities and imagination. The seemingly bizarre occurrences of the author's experiences were almost enough for me to stop reading and dismiss this as a work of fraud. However, later, as the author explains that he, too, doesn't really understand what happened to him, I realized that his experiences are actually common to most people. Our comprehension levels are simply nowhere near what is necessary for a complete experience.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)