The Communist Manifesto: With Related Documents / Edition 1

The Communist Manifesto: With Related Documents / Edition 1

4.1 22
by Karl Marx, Frederick Engels, John E. Toews
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 0312157118

ISBN-13: 9780312157111

Pub. Date: 02/28/1999

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

Does the closing of the cold war era open up the possibility of reading the Communist Manifesto in new ways? In the first teaching edition of the post-Cold War era, Toews proposes new guidelines for reassessing the work to help students reconstruct the meaning of the Manifesto in its time and at the close of the twentieth century. Together with the

Overview

Does the closing of the cold war era open up the possibility of reading the Communist Manifesto in new ways? In the first teaching edition of the post-Cold War era, Toews proposes new guidelines for reassessing the work to help students reconstruct the meaning of the Manifesto in its time and at the close of the twentieth century. Together with the complete text of the work, this brief volume includes some key foundational documents by Hegel, Feverbach, Marx, Engels, and others that show the evolution of and influences on Marxist theory over time. The editor's introduction traces the trajectory of Marx's thought from the 1830s onward, while providing background on the political, social, and intellectual contexts of which the Manifesto was a historical product.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312157111
Publisher:
Bedford/St. Martin's
Publication date:
02/28/1999
Series:
Bedford Cultural Editions Series
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
184
Sales rank:
966,479
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.27(h) x 0.39(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface

Introduction: Historical Contexts of the Communist Manifesto
The Immediate Historical Contexts of the Manifesto
Historical Premises of the Manifesto
Specters of Politics and Ideology
From the Manifesto to Capital: The Lessons of History and the Laws of History

PART I. THE DOCUMENT

Note on the Text

Manifesto of the Communist Party

PART II. RELATED DOCUMENTS

1. A Credo for the Communist League
Frederick Engels, Draft of a Communist Confession of Faith, June 9, 1847

2. From Confession to Manifesto
Frederick Engels, from A Letter to Karl Marx, November 23/24, 1847

3. Lessons from England: The Nature and Impact of the Industrial Revolution
Frederick Engels, from The Condition of the Working Class in England, 1845

4. Utopian Socialism and the Principle of Cooperation
Robert Owen, from Report to the County of Lanark, 1820

5. Utopian Socialism and the Science of Attraction
Charles Fourier, from The Theory of the Four Movements and of the General Destinies, 1808

6. Utopian Socialism and the Labor Process: Fourier on Attractive Labor
Charles Fourier, from The Theory of Universal Unity, 1841-1843

7. Utopian Socialism and the Labor as the Core of Social Exchange
Robert Owen, from Report to the County of Lanark, 1820

8. The People's Charter
The Six Points of the People's Charter, 1838

9. Chartist "Socialism"
James Bronterre O'Brien, Private Property, 1841

10. Hegel on Freedom
G. W. F. Hegel, from Reason in History: A General Introduction to the Philosophy of History, 1837

11. Marx and the Momentum of Emancipation
Karl Marx, from Contribution to the Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Law, 1844

12. The Critique of Political Emancipation
Karl Marx, from On the Jewish Question, 1843

13. The Principle of Sensuous Existence
Ludwig Feuerbach, from Principles of the Philosophy of the Future, 1843

14. Alienated Labor
Karl Marx, from The Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, 1844

15. Constructing a Historial Materialism
Karl Marx, Theses on Feuerbach, 1845

16. The Premises of a Marxian Theory of History
Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, from The German Ideology, 1845-1846

17. Marx and the Lessons of Revolution I
Karl Marx, from The Class Struggles in France, 1848-1850, 1852

18. Marx and Lessons of the Revolution II
Karl Marx, from The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, 1852

19. The Impact of Revolutionary Failure: The Collapse of Working-Class Politics
Karl Marx, from Inaugural Address of the Working Men's International Association, October 1864

20. The Return to Hegel
Karl Marx, Afterword to the Second German Edition of Capitol, 1873

21. The Hidden Reality of Bourgeois Society
Karl Marx, The Fetishism of Commodities and the Secret Thereof, 1867

22. Engels on Marx's Legacy
Frederick Engels, Speech at Karl Marx's Funeral, March 1883

APPENDICES

Chronology for the Historical Contexts of the Manifesto (1765-1895)
Questions for Consideration
Selected Bibliography

Index

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Communist Manifesto: 150th Anniversary Commemorative Editio 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No, the Pathfinder edition of the Communist Manifesto is not introduced by "renowned social theorist David Harvey," whoever he is. It's introduced by renowned world revolutionary Leon Trotsky. Trotsky's approx. 12 pg. introduction written in 1937 is (along with the prefaces by Marx and Engels) worth more than all the other hundreds of introductions put together. This is the best edition.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this particular edition of the Communist Manifesto, the reader is treated to an introduction by Leon Trotsky, one of the central leaders of the Russian Revolution as well as some correspondence from Marx and Engels. But it is the Manifesto itself which bears repeated readings and discussion. How could such a short work have been the basis for revolutions around the world? It is due I think to the fundamental points made: i.e. that workers of the world must unite---as they have more in common with each other than their own national rich and powerful. In very brief but cogent explanations, Marx and Engels give a concise history of mankind and prove that all history in the 'history of class struggles'. Be it feudal lords and serfs or autoworkers and General Motors, it is still the truth.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Because of the tragic disasters of Stalinism, Maoism and other horrendous fascistic dictatorial regimes, the very word 'communism' brings with it many pejoratives. These misconceptions must be dispelled, and the Communist Manifesto can do that. It is clear that the current politco-ecomic model (i.e american capitalism) is failing so many people of the world; oppressing their democratic rights, and keeping them in repressed, subjigated conditions with little to eat or drink and nowhere to live. A better world must be built - a truly democratic world, ran by the people, for the people, not by the rich, for the rich as today's society is. Although the Communist Manifesto is specific to its time, its sentiments and programmes for a better world are still applicable today, and all those wishing to fight inequality, injustice and oppression should read this pamphlet. It is an essential for all revolutionaries.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting: it provides great insight into the minds of great communist leaders and the extreme side of socialism
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Soooo..........this is akward
Avid_ReaderMJ More than 1 year ago
Exellent copy. Wish it had a table of content to aid in navigation.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Whether you think the enemy of working people and of young people who want a human world is 'globalization' ,or Bush, or politicians in general, or just your boss : if you are fighting for a better life for all; if war, mass unemployment, poverty, racism, sexism etc, etc, repell and anger you , then you need this pamphlet. Now. You will keep wondering as you read , ' When was this written ? ' Because in this pamphlet two young revolutionary fighters ( one 29, one 30 yrs. old at the time ) describe the world we live in today : 'global ' capitalism .They also describe the only social class that can put an end to this system : the very working people who create all wealth and the basis for all culture. Not rhetoric, but science.With introduction by a co-leader ( with Lenin ) of the Russian Revolution and fighter against Stalin-ism , Leon Trotsky.You can see this same approach applied to today?s world in The Working Class And The Transformation Of Learning and Cuba And The Coming American Revolution by U.S. socialist leader Jack Barnes. ( Also from Pathfinder Press.)
Guest More than 1 year ago
Written by two young men who saw how to change the world. It's in-your-face. The opening gambit is a taunt: 'A spectre is haunting Europe -- the spectre of communism.' Fighters flaunting their confidence. Great vivid images which ring all the truer today -- capitalism is like a sorcerer who has conjured up immense forces beyond his control, they say. But, ridiculously, forces of too-much wealth, too-much food, over-abundance in the face of starvation and devastation. Sound like today's world? They explain why this happens and how to end the paradox. The Manifesto answers the debates and rulers' propaganda of the time (and ours, too). Are communists godless heathens? Do they abandon morals and use women? Are rebels just lazy good-for-nothings? I like the Pathfinder edition because it's cheap, has an introduction by a leader of the Russian revolution (Leon Trotsky) which brings it up-to-date for our epoch and has lots of margin space in which to write notes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It does not work! Were is the great USSR now!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Marx is always fascinating. But if you read this, read Paul Johnson's 'Intellectuals'. Gives you a good perspective on Marx and why he wrote this watershed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While the Marx/Engles views are clearly wrong, the Manifesto makes for an interesting read nonetheless.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Written in a very persuasive manner. Reading the Manifesto really takes you back to those times and the gap betweem the rich and poor (bourgeiose and prolatriat). More importantly it Marx's really give valid reasons agaisnt capitalism and for communism. Its a great book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
From each according to his ability to each according to his need. -Karl Marx
lenin1890 More than 1 year ago
the glory of the motherland is in this book. Long live the glorious revolution.