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Communitarian Reader / Edition 1

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Overview

As an academic discipline, a public philosophy, and a social movement, Communitarianism has had a profound influence on contemporary American society. By promoting the idea that a good society is based on a carefully crafted balance between individual rights and social responsibilities, Communitarians have inspired new ideas and crafted new policies to strengthen our families, communities and nation. The Communitarian Reader: Beyond the Essentials brings together essays by prominent social thinkers, reflecting on a wide-range of issues—from new approaches to fighting crime in inner city, to the relationship between norms and laws, and to the role of civil liberties after September 11th. Following the success of The Essential Communitarian Reader, this work takes readers to the next level of Communitarianism, and serves as a vital guide for all interested in further exploring this important social movement.

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Editorial Reviews

Perspectives On Political Science
In a time with questions of local versus global allegiance, concerns for what is an appropriate moral focus, and arguments for how to instill 'proper' values into children, the issues raised in this excellent and thought-provoking reader are critical to ponder and discuss. Americans still argue the value of liberal thought in regard to the body politics, and this book provides a useful and important alternative to that view of human associations. This book can be read with profit by all segments of the public and university communities.
Robert Ackerman
The Communitarian Reader: Beyond the Essentials accomplishes just what its name implies. It offers a sophisticated sampling of provacative essays from a variety of communitarian perspectives. Rather than setting forth a standard communitarian 'truth,' it gathers together a series of fascinating and sometimes divergent views, bound together by an appreciation of the value of community and social responsibility.
Steven G. Brint
Many people suspect that a new way must exist between the doctrine of laissez-faire (with its disdain for the bonds of society) and the doctrine of prescriptive conservatism (with its disdain for individual liberties). That new way does exist. It is called 'communitarianism,' and Amitai Etzioni is its leading theorist. This book presents an exciting and practical alternative to philosophies that have failed us.
Paul Lichterman
A fresh, communitarian imagination animates these accessible theoretical essays, lively position pieces, and timely reports on American social trends. Here are lots of conversation-starters for anyone who wants to create a more responsible society.
Stephen Elkin
This is an important collection of papers on communitarian themes. The authors are uniformly first-rate thinkers, and anyone who wants an overview of the subject can do no better than turning to the workn assembled by Etzioni and his collegues.
Mark E. Gammon
Professor Etzioni has put himself in excellent company, usefully extending the communitarian project both practically and theoretically with input from many of the top political thinkers of our time. An invaluable volume for academicians, policymakers, and anyone concerned with the dissolution of social capital in our increasingly fragmented world.
Perspectives on Political Science
In a time with questions of local versus global allegiance, concerns for what is an appropriate moral focus, and arguments for how to instill 'proper' values into children, the issues raised in this excellent and thought-provoking reader are critical to ponder and discuss. Americans still argue the value of liberal thought in regard to the body politics, and this book provides a useful and important alternative to that view of human associations. This book can be read with profit by all segments of the public and university communities.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742542198
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/1/2004
  • Series: Rights and Responsibilities Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 0.60 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 6.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Amitai Etzioni is the founder of the communitarian movement and university professor at George Washington University. He is the editor of The Responsive Community: Rights and Responsibilities, a communitarian quarterly and the author of numerous books on political and social theory, including The New Golden Rule and My Brother's Keeper. Andrew Volmert is completing his PhD at Yale University. Elanit Rothschild is mangaging editor of The Responsive Community.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 The Responsive Community Platform: Rights and Responsibilities Part 3 I Theory and Social Philosophy Chapter 4 No Community, No Democracy Chapter 5 Combining Value Pluralism and Moral Universalism: Isaiah Berlin and Beyond Chapter 6 Legislating Morality in Liberal Democracies Chapter 7 On a Communitarian Faith Chapter 8 Are Particularistic Obligations Justified? A Communitarian Examination Part 9 II The Communitarian Society Chapter 10 Enforcing Norms: When the Law Gets in the Way Chapter 11 Social Mores Are Not Enough Chapter 12 Confessions of an Alleged Libertarian (and the Virtues of "Soft" Communitarianism) Chapter 13 The Contours of Remoralization Chapter 14 The Duty to Rescue: A Liberal Communitarian Approach Chapter 15 Does Socioeconomic Inequality Undermine Community? Implications for Communitarian Theory Chapter 16 Americans as Communitarians: An Empirical Study Part 17 III Community Chapter 18 Developing Civil Society: Can the Workplace Replace Bowling? Chapter 19 Self-Sacrifice, Self-Fulfillment, and Mutuality: The Evolution of Marriage Chapter 20 Peer Marriage Chapter 21 Community and the Corner Store: Retrieving Human-Scale Commerce Chapter 22 Boston's Ten Point Coalition: A Faith-Based Approach to Fighting Crime in the Inner City Chapter 23 Can Design Make Community? Part 24 IV Communitarian Policies Chapter 25 Rights and Responsibilities, 2001 Chapter 26 Confusing Freedom with License—Licenses Terrorism, Not Freedom Chapter 27 We Can Strike a Balance on Civil Liberties Chapter 28 Liberal Sectarianism? Social Capital, Religious Communities, and Public Funds Chapter 29 The Benefits of Surveillance? Chapter 30 Military Secrets and First Amendment Values Chapter 31 Diversity Within Unity: A New Approach to Immigrants and Minorities Part 32 V Dialogues Chapter 33 Virtue and the State: A Dialogue between a Communitarian and a Social Conservative Chapter 34 Virtue, Self-Interest, and the Good: A Dialogue on Communitarianism and Classical Liberalism

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