Community-Based Participatory Research for Health: From Process to Outcomes / Edition 2

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Overview

Minkler and Wallerstein have pulled together a fantastic set of contributions from the leading researchers in the field. In addition to a fine collection of case studies, this book puts the key issues for researchers and practitioners in a historical, philosophical, and applied, practical context

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470260432
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 10/27/2008
  • Series: Wiley Desktop Editions Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 544
  • Sales rank: 368,147
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Meredith Minkler, DRPH, is professor and chair of CommunityHealth Education and Health and Social Behavior, Division of Healthand Social Behavior, at the School of Public Health, University ofCalifornia, Berkeley, California.

Nina Wallerstein, DRPH, is professor and founding director ofthe MPH program at the University of New Mexico Health SciencesCenter, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

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Table of Contents

Tables, Figures, and Exhibits.

The Editors.

The Contributors.

Acknowledgments.

PART ONE: INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORYRESEARCH.

One: Introduction to Community-Based Participatory Research:New Issues and Emphases (Meredith Minkler and NinaWallerstein).

The Growing Support for CBPR.

Semantics and Core Principles.

CBPR and the Fight to Eliminate Health Disparities.

Goals of This Book: Continuing Concerns and New Emphases.

Organization of This Book.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Two: The Theoretical, Historical, and Practice Roots of CBPRand Related Participatory Traditions (Nina Wallerstein and BonnieDuran).

Historical Roots.

Core Concepts and New Theories.

Feminism, Poststructuralism, and Postcolonialism.

Paulo Freire and Praxis.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Three: Critical Issues in Developing and FollowingCommunity-Based Participatory Research Principles (Barbara A.Israel, Amy J. Schulz, Edith A. Parker, Adam B. Becker, Alex J.Allen III, and J. Ricardo Guzman).

CBPR Definition and Key Principles.

Issues in Developing and Following CBPR Principles.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Four: Bringing Experimental Design to Community-PartneredParticipatory Research (Loretta Jones, Paul Koegel, and Kenneth B.Wells).

Using CPPR as a Framework.

The Fit Between Designs and Projects.

Experimental Design Lessons from the Building WellnessPilot.

Applying the Lessons: CPIC.

The Road Ahead for CPIC.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

PART TWO: POWER, TRUST, AND DIALOGUE: WORKING WITH DIVERSECOMMUNITIES IN COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH.

Five: The Dance of Race and Privilege in Community-BasedParticipatory Research (Vivian Chãvez, Bonnie Duran, QuintonE. Baker, Magdalena M. Avila, Nina Wallerstein).

Framework of Oppression and Racism.

Translating Culture.

White Privilege.

Building Alliances Across Differences.

Recommendations for Research and Practice.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Six: Are Academics Irrelevant? Approaches and Roles forScholars in Community-Based Participatory Research (RandyStoecker).

Options for the Academic.

Recommendations for the Academic.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Seven: Community-Based Participatory Research with CambodianGirls in Long Beach, California: A Case Study (Ann Cheatham-Rojasand Eveline Shen).

ACRJ and the HOPE Projects.

Setting the Stage for Participatory Research.

Identifying Sexual Harassment as an Issue.

Researching the Problem.

Moving into Action.

Khmer Girls in Action: A Youth-Led Organization Is Born.

Lessons Learned.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Eight: CBPR with a Hidden Population: The TransgenderCommunity Health Project a Decade Later (Kristen Clements-Nolle andAri Max Bachrach).

The Transgender Community and the CBPR Study.

Project Impact over Ten Years.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

PART THREE: SELECTING ISSUES AND EVALUATING OUTCOMES WITHCOMMUNITIES.

Nine: Community-Driven Asset Identification and IssueSelection (Meredith Minkler and Trevor Hancock).

Core Principles and Considerations.

Tools for Identifying Community Resources and Concerns.

Issue Selection in CBPR.

When Preexisting Goals Constrain Issue Selection.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Ten: Using Web-Based Tools to Build Capacity for CBPR: TwoCase Studies of American Indian Leadership Development (MaritaJones, Shelley Frazier, Chris Percy, Jeffrey L. Stowell, KristineMaltrud, and Nina Wallerstein).

Introduction to Case Studies.

Case 1: Healthy Native Communities Fellowship.

Case 2: Just Move It.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Eleven: Using Photovoice for Participatory Assessment andIssue Selection: Lessons from a Family, Maternal and Child HealthDepartment (Caroline C. Wang and Cheri A. Pies).

Background and Conceptual Framework.

Community Assessment.

A Photovoice Case Study from a County Health Department.

Reflecting on Value Added.

Recommendations and Implications.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Twelve: Issues in Participatory Evaluation (Jane Springettand Nina Wallerstein).

What Is Evaluation?

What Is Participatory Evaluation?

Use of PE in Community Health.

PE Issues in Community Health Promotion.

Youth Link Case Study.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

PART FOUR: METHODOLOGICAL AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS INPLANNING AND CONDUCTING COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORYRESEARCH.

Thirteen: Issues and Choice Points for Improving the Qualityof Action Research (Hilary Bradbury and Peter Reason).

Broadening the Bandwidth of Validity.

Toward a Participatory Worldview.

Choice Points for Action Research.

Emergent Inquiry Toward Enduring Consequence.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Fourteen: Impacts of CBPR on Academic Researchers, ResearchQuality and Methodology, and Power Relations (Meredith Minkler andAndrea Corage Baden).

Methods.

Impacts of CBPR on Methodology and Processes.

Impacts on Research Quality.

Impacts on Power Relations.

Discussion.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Fifteen: Methodological and Ethical Considerations inCommunity-Driven Environmental Justice Research: Two Case Studiesfrom Rural North Carolina (Stephanie Ann Farquhar and SteveWing).

Eastern North Carolina Snapshot.

Case 1: Industrialized Hog Production.

Case 2: Discrimination in Disaster Relief.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Sixteen: Analyzing and Interpreting Data with Communities(Suzanne B. Cashman, Alex J. Allen III, Jason Corburn, Barbara A.Israel, Jaime Monta~no, Scott D. Rhodes, Samara F. Swanston, andEugenia Eng).

Case 1: Survey Data from the East Side Village Health WorkerPartnership.

Case 2.: Focus Group Data from a Latino Men's Soccer League.

Case 3: Mapping Data in the Watchperson Project and ElPuente.

Lessons Learned.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

PART FIVE: USING COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH TOPROMOTE SOCIAL CHANGE AND HEALTHY PUBLIC POLICY.

Seventeen: The Role of Community-Based Participatory Researchin Policy Advocacy (Makani Themba-Nixon, Meredith Minkler, andNicholas Freudenberg).

The Policy-Making Process.

Defining and Framing a Policy Goal.

Selecting a Policy Approach.

Identifying a Target.

Support, Power, and Opposition.

Policy Process Stages and CBPR Opportunities.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Eighteen: Using CBPR to Promote Environmental Justice Policy:A Case Study from Harlem, New York (Peggy Shepard, VictoriaBreckwich Vãsquez, and Meredith Minkler).

Case Background.

Research Methods, Roles, and Findings.

Discussion.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Nineteen: Participatory Action Research with Hotel RoomCleaners in San Francisco and Las Vegas: From Collaborative Studyto the Bargaining Table (Pam Tau Lee, Niklas Krause, CharlesGoetchius, Jo Marie Agresti, and Robin Baker).

Theoretical Framework.

Research Partners' Roles and Concerns.

Defining Topics and Enhancing Participation.

Designing and Pilot-Testing the Survey.

Selecting the Sample Populations.

Planning Outreach and Logistics.

Analyzing the Data.

Study Findings Translating Findings into Action.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Twenty: Addressing Food Security Through Policy PromotingStore Conversions: The Role of a CBPR Partnership (VictoriaBreckwich Vãsquez, Dana Lanza, Susana Hennessey Lavery,Shelley Facente, Helen Ann Halpin, and Meredith Minkler).

Food Insecurity.

The CBPR Partnership.

LEJ Partnership's Policy Steps.

Local Policy-Related Outcomes.

Summary.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

PART SIX: NEXT STEPS AND STRATEGIES FOR THE FUTURE OFCOMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH.

Twenty-One: What Predicts Outcomes in Community-BasedParticipatory Research (Nina Wallerstein, John Oetzel, BonnieDuran, Greg Tafoya, Lorenda Belone, and Rebecca Rae).

Study Background.

Literature Search.

Assessing Dimensions of Participation and Partnership.

Final Model Relationships Between Dimensions.

Measurement Issues.

Summary and Implications for Future Research.

Questions for Discussion.

Key Terms.

Appendix A: A Protocol for Community-Based Research (LelandBrown and William A. Vega).

Appendix B: Federal Funding and Support for ParticipatoryResearch in Public Health and Health Care (Shawna L. Mercer andLawrence W. Green).

Appendix C: Reliability-Tested Guidelines for AssessingParticipatory Research Projects (Shawna L. Mercer, Lawrence W.Green, Margaret Cargo, Margaret A. Potter, Mark Daniel, R. ScottOlds, and Erika Reed-Gross).

Appendix D: Using the Community Tool Box Online DocumentationSystem to Support Participatory Evaluation of Community HealthInitiatives (Stephen Fawcett and Jerry Schultz).

Appendix E: Making the Best Case for Community-EngagedScholarship in Promotion and Tenure Review (Sarena D. Seifer).

Appendix F: Community Partnership Through a Nursing Lens(Jennifer Averill).

Appendix G: Ethical Review of Community-Based ParticipatoryResearch: Considerations for Institutional Review Boards (SarahFlicker, Robb Travers, Adrian Guta, Sean McDonald, and AileenMeagher).

Appendix H: Research Policies, Processes, and Protocol: TheNavajo Nation Human Research Review Board (Beverly Becenti-Pigman,Kalvin White, Bea Bowman, Nancy "Lynn" Palmanteer-Holder, andBonnie Duran).

Appendix I: Undoing Racism Training as a Foundation for TeamBuilding in CBPR (Robert E. Aronson, Michael A. Yonas, Nora Jones,Nettie Coad, and Eugenia Eng).

Appendix J: Risk Mapping as a Tool for Community-BasedParticipatory Research and Organizing (Marianne P. Brown).

Appendix K: Using CBPR to Promote Policy Change: Exercises andOnline Resources (Cassandra Ritas, Meredith Minkler, Angela Ni, andHelen Ann Halpin).

Appendix L: Selected Centers and Other Resources forParticipatory Research in North America (Meredith Minkler, NinaWallerstein, Angela Ni, and Rosanna Tran).

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