A Companion to Greek Mythology / Edition 1

A Companion to Greek Mythology / Edition 1

5.0 1
by Ken Dowden
     
 

ISBN-10: 140511178X

ISBN-13: 9781405111782

Pub. Date: 05/17/2011

Publisher: Wiley

A Companion to Greek Mythology presents a series of essays that explore the phenomenon of Greek myth from its origins in shared Indo-European story patterns and the Greeks' contacts with their Eastern Mediterranean neighbours through its development as a shared language and thought-system for the Greco-Roman world.
• Features essays from a prestigious

…  See more details below

Overview

A Companion to Greek Mythology presents a series of essays that explore the phenomenon of Greek myth from its origins in shared Indo-European story patterns and the Greeks' contacts with their Eastern Mediterranean neighbours through its development as a shared language and thought-system for the Greco-Roman world.
• Features essays from a prestigious international team of literary experts
• Includes coverage of Greek myth's intersection with history, philosophy and religion
• Introduces readers to topics in mythology that are often inaccessible to non-specialists
• Addresses the Hellenistic and Roman periods as well as Archaic and Classical Greece

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781405111782
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
05/17/2011
Series:
Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World Series, #87
Pages:
672
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.80(h) x 1.60(d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations.

List of Maps.

List of Tables.

Notes on Contributors.

To the Reader.

Acknowledgements.

Glossary.

Abbreviations.

Approaching Myth: Thinking through myth - thinking myth through (Ken Dowden & Niall Livingstone).

Part 1 - Establishing the canon.

1.1 Homer's use of myth (Françoise Létoublon).

1.2 Telling the mythology: from Hesiod to the fifth century (Ken Dowden).

1.3 Orphic mythology (Radcliffe G. Edmonds III).

Part 2 - Myth performed, myth believed.

2.1 Singing myth: Pindar (Ian Rutherford).

2.2 Instructing myth: from Homer to the sophists (Niall Livingstone).

2.3 Acting myth: Athenian drama (Jean Alaux).

2.4 Displaying myth: the visual arts (Susan Woodford).

2.5 Platonic 'myths' (Penelope Murray).

2.6 Myth in history (Alan Griffiths).

Part 3 - New traditions.

3.1 Myth and Hellenic identities (Fritz Graf).

3.2 Names and places: myth in Alexandria (Anatole Mori).

3.3 The myth of Rome (Matthew Fox).

3.4 Displaying myth for Roman eyes (Zahra Newby).

3.5 The myth that saves: mysteries and mysteriosophies (Ken Dowden).

3.6 Myth and death: Roman mythological sarcophagi (Zahra Newby).

3.7 Myth in Christian authors (Fritz Graf).

Part 4 - Older traditions.

4.1 The Indo-European background to Greek mythology (Nicholas J. Allen).

4.2 Near Eastern mythologies (Alasdair Livingstone & Birgit Haskamp).

4.3 Underworlds in Greece and neighbouring cultures (Nanno Marinatos & Nicolas Wyatt).

Part 5 - Interpretation.

5.1 Interpreting images (Susan Woodford).

5.2 The myth of history: the case of Troy (Dieter Hertel).

5.3 Women and myth (Sian Lewis).

5.4 Mythology of the Black Land: Greek myths and Egyptian origins (Ian Rutherford).

5.5 Psychoanalysis: the wellspring of myth? (Richard Armstrong).

5.6 Initiation: the key to myth? (Ken Dowden).

5.7 The semiotics and pragmatics of myth (Claude Calame).

Part 6 - Conspectus.

6.1 A brief history of the study of Greek mythology (Jan N. Bremmer).

Guide to fragmentary and less easily found texts.

Bibliography.

Index of texts discussed.

Index of names.

Index of subjects.

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A Companion to Greek Mythology 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Jennifer-VA More than 1 year ago
As scholars and students of ancient history know, Wiley-Blackwell provides a "companion" for many of the most significant topics relating to the genre. While a companion on Greek mythology might at first seem overkill, given the number of books on the subject, Dowden and Livingstone have done the field a service by gathering together a nice group of scholars, who in turn have produced readable, informative, and well-researched articles on a variety of aspects of Greek myth. A glance at the Table of Contents (under Features on the B&N site) shows the depth and breadth of these articles, and the reader is well-rewarded by the quality of the texts. Many illustrations and a dozen or so tables accompany and clarify or illuminate the articles. Depending on your level of expertise, a couple of these may prove to be on the introductory side (though readers looking for a light summary of Greek myth must turn elsewhere). In general, however, the articles are uniformly interesting and -- what I consider the best thing about these massy tomes -- they lead you to some fascinating places you hadn't considered going. And surely that's the sign of a good companion.