Comparative Romanticisms: Power, Gender, Subjectivity

Overview

Despite a century of sustained critical activity and an interest level in the last ten years never before reached (as reflected in the sheer number of scholarly works produced), the study of Romanticism remains focused for the most part through individual, national, and linguistic views, and is now largely embedded in the complications of contemporary theory as applied through those limiting views. Partly responsible is the fact that Romanticism itself forms a set of rhetorical, cultural, and ideological lenses ...

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Overview

Despite a century of sustained critical activity and an interest level in the last ten years never before reached (as reflected in the sheer number of scholarly works produced), the study of Romanticism remains focused for the most part through individual, national, and linguistic views, and is now largely embedded in the complications of contemporary theory as applied through those limiting views. Partly responsible is the fact that Romanticism itself forms a set of rhetorical, cultural, and ideological lenses refracting a multiplicity and even chaos that at times seems to defy comparative analysis.In an attempt to refocus on Romanticism without trying to invent a new synthesis for the movement, the editors have selected thirteen essays from a variety of older and newer scholarly voices that represent a rethinking of key Romantic texts and interrelations through the lens of three fundamental theoretical issues: power, gender, and subjectivity. They call for a newly comparative sense of Romanticism that avoids the kind of critical explication of these issues limited to single national, linguistic, or cultural traditions, or seen through too narrowly applied contemporary theoretical '-isms'.

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Product Details

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
A Lens for Comparative Romanticisms 1
Remapping the Landscape: The Romantic Literary Community Revisited 11
Mutual Trust and the Friendly Loan: Melville, Money, and Romantic Faith 33
Romantic and Realist Rubble: The Foundation for a New National Literature in Dostoevsky's Poor Folk and Melville's Pierre 47
From Revolutionary Legends to The Scarlet Letter: Casting Characters for Early American Romanticism 59
The Unexpress'd: Walt Whitman's Late Thoughts on Richard Wagner 81
The Female Gothic, Beating Fantasies, and the Civilizing Process 101
The Canon-Maker: Felicia Hemans and Torquato Tasso's Sister 133
"Ungraspable Phantoms": Keats's Lamia and Melville's Yillah 159
Aesthetic Discourses and Maternal Subjects: Enlightenment Roots, Schlegelian Revisions 171
Pushkin and Romantizm 193
Romantic Poetry and Civic Space in the Wordsworthian Cave 199
Atala's Body: Girodet and the Representation of Chateaubriand's Romantic Christianity 211
The Postponed Narratives of Desire in Ludwig Tieck's Novel Franz Sternbalds Wanderungen 223
Notes on Contributors 235
Index 239
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