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Comparative Textual Media

Overview

For the past few hundred years, Western cultures have relied on print. When writing was accomplished by a quill pen, inkpot, and paper, it was easy to imagine that writing was nothing more than a means by which writers could transfer their thoughts to readers. The proliferation of technical media in the latter half of the twentieth century has revealed that the relationship between writer and reader is not so simple. From telegraphs and typewriters to wire recorders and a sweeping array of digital computing ...

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Comparative Textual Media: Transforming the Humanities in the Postprint Era

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Overview

For the past few hundred years, Western cultures have relied on print. When writing was accomplished by a quill pen, inkpot, and paper, it was easy to imagine that writing was nothing more than a means by which writers could transfer their thoughts to readers. The proliferation of technical media in the latter half of the twentieth century has revealed that the relationship between writer and reader is not so simple. From telegraphs and typewriters to wire recorders and a sweeping array of digital computing devices, the complexities of communications technology have made mediality a central concern of the twenty-first century.

Despite the attention given to the development of the media landscape, relatively little is being done in our academic institutions to adjust. In Comparative Textual Media, editors N. Katherine Hayles and Jessica Pressman bring together an impressive range of essays from leading scholars to address the issue, among them Matthew Kirschenbaum on archiving in the digital era, Patricia Crain on the connection between a child’s formation of self and the possession of a book, and Mark Marino exploring how to read a digital text not for content but for traces of its underlying code.

Primarily arguing for seeing print as a medium along with the scroll, electronic literature, and computer games, this volume examines the potential transformations if academic departments embraced a media framework. Ultimately, Comparative Textual Media offers new insights that allow us to understand more deeply the implications of the choices we, and our institutions, are making.

Contributors: Stephanie Boluk, Vassar College; Jessica Brantley, Yale U; Patricia Crain, NYU; Adriana de Souza e Silva, North Carolina State U; Johanna Drucker, UCLA; Thomas Fulton, Rutgers U; Lisa Gitelman, New York U; William A. Johnson, Duke U; Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, U of Maryland; Patrick LeMieux; Mark C. Marino, U of Southern California; Rita Raley, U of California, Santa Barbara; John David Zuern, U of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780816680047
  • Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
  • Publication date: 11/12/2013
  • Series: Electronic Mediations Series
  • Pages: 344
  • Sales rank: 957,031
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

N. Katherine Hayles is professor of literature at Duke University. She is author of several books, including How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics and Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the Literary.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Introduction. Making, Critique: A Media Framework

N. Katherine Hayles and Jessica Pressman

Part I. Theories

1. TXTual Practice

Rita Raley

2. Mobile Narratives: Reading and Writing Urban Space with Location-Based Technologies

Adriana de Souza e Silva

3. The .txtual Condition

Matthew G. Kirschenbaum

4. From A to Screen

Johanna Drucker

Part II. Practices

5. Bookrolls as Media

William A. Johnson

6. Dwarven Epitaphs: Procedural Histories in Dwarf Fortress

Stephanie Boluk and Patrick LeMieux

7. Reading Childishly?: A Codicology of the Modern Self

Patricia Crain

8. Print Culture (Other than Codex): Job Printing and Its Importance

Lisa Gitelman

Part III. Recursions

9. Medieval Remediations

Jessica Brantley

10. Gilded Monuments: Shakespeare’s Sonnets, Donne’s Letters, and the Mediated Text

Thomas Fulton

11. Reading Screens: Comparative Perspectives on Computational Poetics

John David Zuern

12. Reading exquisite_code: Critical Code Studies of Literature

Mark C. Marino

Contributors

Index

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