Comparative Vertebrate Neuroanatomy: Evolution and Adaptation / Edition 2

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Overview

Comparative Vertebrate Neuroanatomy

Evolution and Adaptation

Second Edition

Ann B. Butler and William Hodos

The Second Edition of this landmark text presents a broad survey of comparative vertebrate neuroanatomy at the introductory level, representing a unique contribution to the field of evolutionary neurobiology. It has been extensively revised and updated, with substantially improved figures and diagrams that are used generously throughout the text. Through analysis of the variation in brain structure and function between major groups of vertebrates, readers can gain insight into the evolutionary history of the nervous system. The text is divided into three sections:
* Introduction to evolution and variation, including a survey of cell structure, embryological development, and anatomical organization of the central nervous system; phylogeny and diversity of brain structures; and an overview of various theories of brain evolution
* Systematic, comprehensive survey of comparative neuroanatomy across all major groups of vertebrates
* Overview of vertebrate brain evolution, which integrates the complete text, highlights diversity and common themes, broadens perspective by a comparison with brain structure and evolution of invertebrate brains, and considers recent data and theories of the evolutionary origin of the brain in the earliest vertebrates, including a recently proposed model of the origin of the brain in the earliest vertebrates that has received strong support from newly discovered fossil evidence

Ample material drawn from the latest research has been integrated into the text and highlighted in special feature boxes, including recent views on homology, cranial nerve organization and evolution, the relatively large and elaborate brains of birds in correlation with their complex cognitive abilities, and the current debate on forebrain evolution across reptiles, birds, and mammals.

Comparative Vertebrate Neuroanatomy is geared to upper-level undergraduate and graduate students in neuroanatomy, but anyone interested in the anatomy of the nervous system and how it corresponds to the way that animals function in the world will find this text fascinating.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"As a textbook for advanced courses and reference work for anyone whose interests touch on vertebrate neuroanatomy...it is a uniquely valuable single-volume survey." (The Quarterly Review of Biology, June 2006)

"...well written and can be a valuable reading material for basic understanding of the brain and its adaptation." (American Association of Anatomists Newsletter, March 2006)

Manuel Dujovny
This book is a review of the evolution and adaptation of the CNS of animals. The book intends to analyze the relationship and evolution of the CNS in vertebrates. The audience for this book is composed of neuroscientists and neuroanatomists as well as neurophysiologists, neurologists, and veterinarians. The book provides an excellent presentation and illustrations. This excellently formatted book incorporates new approaches to comparative analysis: (1) organization degree of evolution of the CNS; (2) a special analysis of the evolution of the thalamus and the forebrain; (3) evolution and embryology analysis. Comparative vertebrate neuroanatomy and the correlation between mammals and nonmammals is one of the outstanding achievements of this book. The adaptation and evolution of the CNS of different species is well demonstrated. I highly recommend this book for neuroscientists, neuroanatomists, neurophysicists, and clinical neurologists.
Booknews
A text/reference for undergraduate and graduate students, physicians, and neuroscientists, illustrating the ongoing relationship between the structure and function of vertebrates. Presuming little prior knowledge of anatomy or biology beyond the college level, it presents a systematic account of the functions of brain systems in vertebrates and their relationship to behavior, adaptation, and survival; new material on the embryology and functional organization of the cranial nerves; and a comparison of vertebrate brains that reveals how similar they are in some ways, and how different in others. Includes numerous drawn figures and diagrams. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Manuel Dujovny, MD (Wayne State University School of Medicine)
Description: This book is a review of the evolution and adaptation of the CNS of animals.
Purpose: The book intends to analyze the relationship and evolution of the CNS in vertebrates.
Audience: The audience for this book is composed of neuroscientists and neuroanatomists as well as neurophysiologists, neurologists, and veterinarians.
Features: The book provides an excellent presentation and illustrations.
Assessment: This excellently formatted book incorporates new approaches to comparative analysis: (1) organization degree of evolution of the CNS; (2) a special analysis of the evolution of the thalamus and the forebrain; (3) evolution and embryology analysis. Comparative vertebrate neuroanatomy and the correlation between mammals and nonmammals is one of the outstanding achievements of this book. The adaptation and evolution of the CNS of different species is well demonstrated. I highly recommend this book for neuroscientists, neuroanatomists, neurophysicists, and clinical neurologists.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471210054
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 8/26/2005
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 744
  • Product dimensions: 8.66 (w) x 10.98 (h) x 1.64 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

List of Boxes.

PART ONE: EVOLUTION AND THE ORGANIZATION OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.

1. Evolution and Variation.

2. Neurons and Sensory Receptors.

3. The Vertebrate Central Nervous System.

4. Vertebrate Phylogeny and Diversity in Brain Organization.

5. Evolution and Adaptation of the Brain, Behavior, and Intelligence.

6. Theories of Brain Evolution.

PART TWO: THE SPNIAL CORD AND HINDBRAIN.

7. Overview of Spinal Cord and Hindbrain.

8. The Spinal Cord.

9. Segmental Organization of the Head, Brain, and Cranial Nerves.

10. Functional Organization of the Cranial Nerves.

11. Sensory Cranial Nerves of the Brainstem.

12. Motor Cranial Nerves.

13. The Reticular Formation.

14. The Cerebellum.

PART THREE: THE MIDBRAIN.

15. Overview of the Midbrain.

16. Isthmus.

17. Tegmentum and Tori.

18. Optic Tectum.

PART FOUR: THE FOREBRAIN: DIENCEPHALON.

19. Overview of the Forebrain.

20. Pretectum. Accessory Optic System, and Migrated Posterior Tuberculum.

21. Epithalamus.

22. Dorsal Thalamus.

23. The Visceral Brain: The Hypothalamus and the Autonomic Nervous System.

PART FIVE: THE FOREBRAIN: TELENCEPHALON.

24. Basal Telencephalon.

25. Nonlimbic Pallium.

26. Visual Forebrain in Amniotes.

27. Somatosensory and Motor Forebrain in Amniotes.

28. Auditory and Vocal Forebrain Amniotes.

29. Terminal Nerve and Olfactory Forebrain.

30. Limbic Telencephalon.

PART SIX: CONCLUSION.

31. Evolution of Brains: A Bilaterian View.

Appendix: Terms Used in Neuroanatomy.

Glossary.

Index.

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