The Compass Rose [NOOK Book]

Overview

The legends of the Godstruck were just that -- legends.

Until, in an attempt to defend her people, Captain Kallista Varyl called on the One for aid and was granted abilities such as no one had seen in centuries.

Now Kallista has been charged with a new destiny as one of the most powerful women in the land -- but her power is useless if it cannot be controlled.

Mastering her "Godstruck" abilities is the first ...

See more details below
The Compass Rose

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 16%)$12.55 List Price

Overview

The legends of the Godstruck were just that -- legends.

Until, in an attempt to defend her people, Captain Kallista Varyl called on the One for aid and was granted abilities such as no one had seen in centuries.

Now Kallista has been charged with a new destiny as one of the most powerful women in the land -- but her power is useless if it cannot be controlled.

Mastering her "Godstruck" abilities is the first step. The next, learning that she cannot unlock the secrets of the Compass Rose and defeat her nation's enemy alone. And finally she must stop a demon-possessed king . . .

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
The Compass Rose, the first novel in Gail Dayton's One Rose trilogy, is an epic romantic fantasy featuring a female protagonist who is as irresistibly sexy as she is tough. As the prophesized Chosen One, Kallista must do the impossible -- travel into the heart of an enemy nation and defeat a demon-possessed king!

Kallista, a captain in the Adaran army as well as a naitan (magic wielder), is an intriguingly complex character with the carnal appetite of Laurell K. Hamilton's Anita Blake and the tenacity of David Weber's Honor Harrington. While defending her city from invading warriors -- and outnumbered more than ten to one -- Kallista calls upon the One for a miracle to save her people. She is suddenly filled with a power that she has never before experienced, and from her hands comes a dark magic that instantly cuts down tens of thousands of enemy warriors. After experts examine Kallista, and find a strange mark on the back of her neck, it is revealed that she has indeed become a living myth, a being straight out of legend -- she is Godstruck. The nation of Adara hasn't seen a godstruck naitan in more than 1,000 years. As the Chosen One, Kallista is charged with the impossible: to travel deep into a distant enemy country -- a nation that treats women as possessions -- and exorcise a demon that is controlling its king!

With unadulterated sensuality that practically ignites the pages and a fantasy quest that is as masterfully intricate as it is entertaining, Dayton's The Compass Rose will absolutely blow away fans of romance-powered fantasy. In a word: wow! Paul Goat Allen

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781426848995
  • Publisher: Harlequin
  • Publication date: 12/1/2009
  • Series: One Rose Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 603,073
  • File size: 406 KB

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER ONE

The wind off the sea snapped the banners to attention on the city walls. It ripped at the edges of the captain’s tight queue and set the two white ribbons of her rank fluttering from her shoulders. Kallista Varyl tugged her tunic, blue for the direction of her magic, into better order. Yet one more time she wished that if she had to have North magic, she might have been given some more useful type. Directing winds, for instance.

She abhorred the way the wind here in Ukiny constantly tugged at her hair, destroying any attempt at neatness and order. And wind magic had civilian uses. Practical, productive uses. Her magic had no use other than war, so here she stood, captain of the Reinine’s Own, on the walls of this besieged city waiting for the coming attack.

“What’s the mood below?” Kallista continued her slow patrol of the ramparts.

“Quiet. Tense. They know what’s coming.” Her shadow moved forward to fall into step beside her. Torchay Omvir had been her constant companion for the past nine years. His tunic was bodyguard’s black trimmed with blue to show whom he served. The folded ribbon set on his sleeve below the shoulder indicated his rank. When they went into summer uniform in a few more weeks, his tattooed rank would show on his upper arm. Most of the men making the military a career did the same.

“Not too tense I hope.”

He shrugged. “Who can say until the moment comes and the battle begins?” Torchay paced alongside her, always keeping his lean height interposed between Kallista and the enemy spread out on the fields and beaches below.

Their white tents dotted the land like virulent pustules of infection as far as the unaided eye could see. Ukiny stood on the lone patch of rock floating to the surface of Adara’s flat northern coast. The city’s chalk-white limestone walls towered over the plains where the enemy camped. That advantage hadn’t meant much so far.

“True.” She neither needed nor even wanted the information she’d asked for. She asked to force Torchay to answer, to have some contact with another human at this loneliest of moments.

Torchay preferred his invisibility, claiming he could protect her better if he went unnoticed. But hair the color of Torchay’s -- deep, vibrant red -- seldom escaped notice even when ruthlessly confined in a proper military queue. And wherever a military naitan went, everyone knew her bodyguard went also. At moments like this one, Kallista preferred company to protocol.

“Tomorrow?” Torchay stopped beside her at the northwest corner tower.

Kallista stared down at the rubble spilling from the breach in Ukiny’s western wall and on down the steep slope of the carefully constructed glacis below. The setting sun gilded those broken stones, mocking the coming death they heralded.

“Likely,” she said. “At dawn or just before. That’s when I’d attack, when we’re at our most tired.”

The enemy ships had appeared unexpectedly off Ukiny just a week ago, hundreds of them. Adaran ships were built for speed and trade, not fighting. With a North magic naitan to call winds on almost every ship, they rarely had to deal with pirates or more political forms of banditry because their vessels were hard to catch. The few local ships in port when the strangers sailed up had fled. The city -- still reeling with astonishment that any would dare invade Adara -- had fastened itself inside stout walls.

Soldiers had poured from the clumsy ships, hundreds and hundreds of them, unloading bizarre equipment and strange-looking devices. The foreign army outnumbered the small force garrisoning Ukiny before half their ships had unloaded.

By careful listening at staff meetings, Kallista had gathered that one of the quarrelsome kings on the continent across the Jeroan Sea to the north had taken all the lands he could on his own continent and now had cast his eye toward Adara. No one seemed to know what drove Tibre on its conquest, whether greed, religion or something else. They were strange people according to the traders stranded in town when the ships fled, divided among themselves according to rank, each rank worshipping different gods.

Stranger yet, they had no naitani of their own and were known to kill those from other lands who demonstrated a visible gift of magic. That was why, despite the overwhelming numbers ranged against them, the small Adaran garrison had been confident of victory over the invading Tibrans. If they had no naitani at all, they certainly wouldn’t have any attached to their army.

They had something else. Cannon.

Traders had been bringing reports for a number of years about the wars among the northern kingdoms. They told of a weapon that required no magic to break down walls and fortifications, a weapon far more effective, far more devastating than ballistae or catapults. The Adaran general staff had discounted these tales as exaggerations. The Tibrans might have something, but nothing without magic involved could have such a deadly effect. The generals were wrong.

Now they were paying the price for their smug assumptions. Adara was a nation of merchants, a matriarchal society that used its army primarily to control the aggression of her young men. A long succession of prelate-queens had seen little need for violent expansion. The last of the independent prinsipalities between the impassable Devil’s Neck land bridge to the north and the nearly impassable Mother Range spanning the continent to the south had joined Adara two hundred years ago, the result of diplomacy and trade, not war.

The Reinines in the years since had believed Adara’s superiority so obvious that no other nation would dare challenge it. And they hadn’t, even though some Adaran traders skinned those they traded with a bit too close to the bone. Adara had more naitani than any other land, and the naitani were Adara’s strength.

But they should have expected the other nations to develop alternatives to the magic Adara used so extravagantly. When the traders came home complaining of cloth made waterproof through the use of powders and mechanical techniques, someone should have noticed. This new stuff wasn’t as good as Adaran waterproofing, but it was much cheaper. How far from there to mechanical weapons as effective at massive destruction as a soldier naitan? More effective, because the cannon could be used by anyone and could be forged by the hundreds. A naitan had to be born.

These terrible cannon belched forth fire and destruction. They battered the city walls hour after endless hour, day upon day. The constant boom!-whistle-crack! as the iron ball exploded from the mouth of the weapon, sailed through the air and smashed into stone, was enough to drive anyone into screaming fits. Anyone, that is, of lesser moral fiber than a captain of the Reinine’s Own Naitani.

Kallista had destroyed one of the awful machines, the only naitan of her troop able to do so. The enemy moved them farther from the walls then, and still kept up the relentless bombardment. These cannon could fire their iron balls farther than she could throw her lightning. She could not hit what she could not see. At least her magic was line-of-sight and not touch-linked. She’d heard of some who could visualize what they aimed for and strike without seeing, but she could not.

This morning, the cannon had breached Ukiny’s walls. Soon the enemy would pour through the gap and bring its advantage of numbers to bear. Kallista knew her fellow soldiers would fight bravely, but the outcome was not optimistic.

“Have you decided where to post your troop?” Torchay never looked away from his view over the wall at the enemy.

Kallista sighed. That was the supposed reason for taking this little stroll into danger. She couldn’t tell her bodyguard that one more second in their austere quarters would have had her chewing holes in the furniture, even if he already knew it. “Yes. Half here -- East and South. Except for Beltis. I want her fire-throwing skill with me and Adessay on the far side of the breach.”

“In the tower.”

“Tower’s too far away. On the wall. Near the breach.”

“Too close. It’s not safe.”

Kallista turned her head and looked at Torchay, at his bony, hawk-nosed visage silhouetted against the orange sky, waiting until he looked back at her.

“It’s a battle, Sergeant,” she said. “It’s not supposed to be safe.” He gave a tiny nod in acknowledgment of that truth

“We need to be as close to the breach as possible.” She moved to the edge of the battlements to peer over, ignoring Torchay’s hiss of displeasure. “It’s going to be up to us to slow their advance, thin their numbers as they come through.”

“You can’t do anything if you’re dead.”

“If we can’t stop them, everyone in the city could well be dead by this time tomorrow. And we haven’t enough regular troops to do the job. It’s going to require magic.”

“Just --” He broke off and took a deep breath. That wasn’t like him, to be fumbling for words. “Don’t make my job harder than it has to be, Captain. Promise me you’ll do nothing reckless.”

Kallista raised an eyebrow. “You forget yourself, Sergeant.”

 

“Probably. But if it means that you don’t forget yourself when the battle begins, I’ll bear the punishment.” Torchay held her gaze until Kallista had to look away.

She did have a tendency to take risks in battle. Too much caution could lose a battle. Generally her risks paid off, but once… Once, she’d nearly got the both of them killed.

“I’ll be as careful as I am able,” she said finally. “But if my action will make the difference in winning or losing, you know I will act.”

“If your lightning can turn the battle, I’ll carry you into it on my back.” Torchay paused then, so long that she glanced up at him. His gaze caught hers, held it. “But I won’t let you throw your life away on a lost cause, Kallista.” He turned away to look out over the enemy camped below.“ Do you understand me, Captain? I will do my duty.”

“I never for a second thought you would do anything else.”

“Have you seen all you needed to see?”

Relieved at Torchay’s return to his normal self, Kallista tugged at the wide cuffs of her supple leather gloves and wished she could take them off. It was too hot for gloves, but a military naitan could not appear in public without them. Not unless she was about to call magic.

“Let’s go down.” She headed for the flimsy ladder leading through the trap door in the floor and below to street level. It would be simple to remove when the time came and prevent access either up or down. “I want the troop up here tonight. If we have to stumble from our billets and stagger into place half-asleep, we’ll be too late.”

Torchay didn’t answer, simply followed her down.

The streets were all but deserted, most shops already closed up, the owners and customers at home praying for rescue and hiding their valuables. The buildings near the wall showed signs of the enemy bombardment. Apparently, pinpoint targeting was not a strong suit of the Tibrans, but then with cannon, it didn’t seem to matter. The buildings here had not been of the sturdiest construction to begin with, mostly weathered wood hovels or sheds with a tendency to lean. Now some were patched with planks or canvas. Homes too near the breach in the wall had become little more than splintered debris. Kallista hoped the residents had found new shelter.

Nearer their quarters, the buildings on either side of the narrow cobbled streets at least stood up straight. More had stone walls rather than wood, and shops displayed a better quality of goods. Flags in bright colors advertised the business operating in the buildings where they flew. Here, shops of all sorts stood hip to thigh, unlike the capital where each type of business had its own street, if not its own neighborhood.

A tailor operated next door to a jeweler, next to a shoemaker, a grocer and so on. Because of the odors they generated, the tanners and the livestock markets were relegated outside the city walls. Kallista had worried about that, about running out of food during a long siege. But that was before the cannon made themselves known. The siege hadn’t been a long one.

A bakeshop along their route still displayed loaves and sweet buns on its fold-down countertop as the baker bustled about preparing to close.

“Wait.” Torchay touched Kallista’s arm, and when she stopped, he approached the baker. “How much for what you have left?”

“Can’t you read?” She jerked a thumb toward the sign. “Two buns or one loaf for a krona.”

“It’s the end of the day, your customers have gone home, and your bread was baked before dawn. You don’t advertise South magic preserving. It’s not worth that price.” Torchay spoke quietly, patiently to the baker. “I’ll give you two kroni for the lot.”

“Listen to me, soldier.” The baker spat out the word. “You got no business telling me what my wares are worth. I made these loaves with my own two hands. I don’t need magic for that. What do you make? Death? What value does that have?”

Kallista stalked toward the plump baker, her foul mood flaring into sudden temper. “What value is your life? If it weren’t for soldiers like him, you would already be living in a Tibran harim with half your iliasti dead. This man is ready to give his life for you, you ungrateful bitch, and you begrudge him a few loaves of bread?”

She knew her anger was out of proportion to the situation, but she couldn’t help it. She’d had enough self-righteous scorn from the locals who looked down their lofty faces at the soldiers defending them yet screamed for help at the first sign of trouble.

But she didn’t realize she’d removed one of her gloves until the shock of skin against skin made her jerk and stare down at Torchay’s bare hand clasping her own.

The baker’s wide eyes said she understood the threat, if not what had caused it, and she was tumbling bread into a rough sack as fast as her hands would move. “Pardon, naitan. Pardon. No offense meant.”

“None taken.” Though that was a small lie. Kallista had taken offense. And she knew better than to do so. She couldn’t change popular opinion. Her own behavior, though unconscious and unintended, had only reinforced the impression that those who served in the military were too wicked or too stupid to do anything else. Anything productive.

She considered removing her hand from Torchay’s grip and replacing the glove. But that would make her inadvertent action seem even more of a threat, withdrawn now that she had what she wanted.

“Thank you, aila.” Torchay held out two kroni. The baker waved them away and he set them on her counter. “I pay my debts, aila. I just mislike paying more than what is due.”

With the sack gripped tight in Torchay’s other hand, he and Kallista continued down the street. Around the corner, out of sight of the bakeshop, she jerked her hand free and rounded on her bodyguard.

“Are you mad? Have you lost the remaining threads of the feeble wits you might once have possessed?” Kallista held her bare hand in front of his face. “I am ungloved.”

“You hadn’t called magic. I was safe enough. I’d have been safe enough even if you had. You have more control than any naitan in the entire army. Probably in all Adara.”

Torchay’s calm unconcern infuriated her.“ You don’t know that. The sparks don’t always show.”

“I know when you call magic. I don’t have to see the sparks. And I know you don’t have to unglove to do it. To do anything.” Kallista yanked her glove back on in short, sharp motions. “Do not ever do that again. Ever. Do you understand me, Sergeant? If you do, I’ll have that chevron if I have to strip the skin off your arm to do it, and see you flogged.”

“You don’t approve of flogging.”

“For this I do. Never touch my bare hands. You know this. You learned it the first day of your guard training.”

Torchay gazed at her. She could see the words building up inside his head, battering at his lips in their desire to get past them. Other naitani had trouble with their guards getting too close, wanting more from the relationship than was possible, but Torchay had never shown any sign of the failing. Was this how it began?

She didn’t want to imagine trouble where none existed. She and Torchay worked well together. She didn’t want that to change, didn’t want to offend him by making faulty assumptions. “If you have something to say, say it.”

He shook his head. “No, I have nothing --” His mouth thinned into a straight line, lips pressed together, stubbornly holding back the words. She would get nothing more out of him, not now.

Torchay turned his back to her, scanning their surroundings for potential danger, pulling back into his familiar role.

“Give me the sack.” Kallista held her hand out for it. He needed his hands free for weapons, now that she was safely gloved again. Civilian naitani weren’t required to go about gloved, but military magic was considered too dangerous to risk a naitan’s loss of control.

Anything covering the bare skin of the hands interfered to some degree with the magic. Leather blocked virtually all magic save for that under the most exquisite control. But Kallista didn’t have to remove her gloves to use her magic. She didn’t know any other naitan who could do what she could.

Copyright © 2005 Gail Dayton

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 21 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2007

    R.I.P. Plotline

    As a few other reviewers have said, this book started out very well. It had a lot of potential, at least in terms of the way I THOUGHT the plot was going. I'm not going to spend a lot of time talking about the things some of the other less-than-pleased reviewers have addressed, but I will say that I agree with most of them, and second their points. I am going to comment on the characters, though. It seemed like Dayton was forcing them into doing things or saying things they didn't want to do or say. Anyone who has read a favorite writer's blog or who has had experience writing will probably know what I mean when I say that once you have a character, it's very difficult to force him or her to do something that is out of character 'and usually makes for some very maladroit writing and dialogue.' I felt like Dayton was doing this with her characters, because they seemed inconsistent. Another thing that rather bothered me while reading was the sudden death of the plotline. The first maybe third or half of the book had a very interesting plotline, and had it continued in the direction I was expecting, it would have been an excellent story and would have had four or five stars from me instead of two. The plot starts out with Kallista 'the female lead' receiving mysterious and frightening powers from the goddess. She and her bodyguard 'who lamentably would have made a great romantic interest and sub-plotline' have to set off to figure out what's going on, and why Kallista received her powers. However, after this point, the plot starts sliding downhill. By page 200, it's dead. The entire second half of the book only vaguely addresses what seemed so important at the beginning, disintegrating into a really convoluted and tasteless soap-opera. One of the main problems is the rather badly done sexual content. I have to make the disclaimer that I am NOT one of those people who hates any sort of romance if it isn't strict monogamy. It is possible to have intimate encounters between characters written very tastefully 'although usually that happens when the characters actually mean something to each other in a romantic way'. However, because of the fact that Kallista's magic has some ridiculous 'sexual' component, and because of the fact that she has to 'marry' everyone who's marked by her magic... well all I have to say about it is that it's difficult to get any more tasteless unless you're looking at the romance novels sold in the grocery stores. The entire mess seemed contrived and forced... not to mention badly done. Even though I was less than 100 pages from the end, I couldn't bother finishing this book. I kept waiting for it to return to the quality it was at the beginning, but it never did. My advice to anyone reading this review is to look elsewhere for good fantasy.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 27, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Jennifer Wardrip - Personal Read

    Have you ever read a book that immediately wrapped you up in its magic and refused to let you go? That's what happened to me with Gail Dayton's THE COMPASS ROSE, the first in the One Rose Trilogy. From amazing characterizations to a world unlike any you've read about before, this book takes you straight into the heart of the story and makes you a part of the action, the mystery, the romance, and the unimaginable magic that is the nation of Adara. <BR/><BR/>Kallista Varyl is a Captain in the Adaran army, a woman intent on saving her city from the invading warriors of their neighboring kingdom, Tibre. The army of Tibre, unlike that of Adara, relies on man-made instruments such as guns and cannons to win its battles, instead of the magic that Kallista and her people use. Now, though, outnumbered over ten to one, magic doesn't seem to be enough-until Kallista, in desperation, calls upon a power that was thought to be only legend, and changes the course of history. <BR/><BR/>Kallista, beyond being a warrior, is also a naitan, a magic wielder. Some have even called her a witch. But her normal magic powers aren't enough to out-battle and out-smart the hordes of the Tibre army, and so she calls upon the One Goddess, something that her kingdom's myths and legends are made of. Only it wasn't a legend, as after calling upon the powers that be, the entire Tibre army is struck dead where they stand-all, that is, except for Stone, a warrior who stirs within Kallista feelings she's never before experienced. <BR/><BR/>Now she's conquered the rival Tibre warriors, but she's left with even more questions than answers. With a mysterious mark on her neck and the brooding Stone, Kallista faces her elders-only to find out that she's been Godstruck, an occurrence that hasn't happened in her nation for over a thousand years. With power beyond belief, Kallista must learn to control the magic that has made her the fulfillment of a prophecy, for she is now the one destined to save her people from the Tibre, and their demon-possessed king. <BR/><BR/>As if defeating the evil king and harnessing her powers weren't enough, the ruler of Adara decrees that all six Godstruck players, not limited to Kallista and Stone, marry and form an instant magical family. They're then ordered to infiltrate the kingdom of Tibre to overthrow its king, and everything that such a coup entails. <BR/><BR/>Gail Dayton has created a magical world unlike anything I've ever experienced. The strange sense of family that abounds in Adara becomes understandable as the story unfolds. The bond that Kallista and Stone share goes beyond mere passion and intertwines with their combined magic. The secondary characters in this book are so real that without them, the book wouldn't be the same. I can honestly say that I'm eagerly anticipating the continuation of this story with the release of THE BARBED ROSE.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2007

    Originally Posted on Romance Junkies

    Have you ever read a book that immediately wrapped you up in its magic and refused to let you go? That's what happened to me with Gail Dayton's THE COMPASS ROSE, the first in the One Rose Trilogy. From amazing characterizations to a world unlike any you've read about before, this book takes you straight into the heart of the story and makes you a part of the action, the mystery, the romance, and the unimaginable magic that is the nation of Adara. Kallista Varyl is a Captain in the Adaran army, a woman intent on saving her city from the invading warriors of their neighboring kingdom, Tibre. The army of Tibre, unlike that of Adara, relies on man-made instruments such as guns and cannons to win its battles, instead of the magic that Kallista and her people use. Now, though, outnumbered over ten to one, magic doesn't seem to be enough-until Kallista, in desperation, calls upon a power that was thought to be only legend, and changes the course of history. Kallista, beyond being a warrior, is also a naitan, a magic wielder. Some have even called her a witch. But her normal magic powers aren't enough to out-battle and out-smart the hordes of the Tibre army, and so she calls upon the One Goddess, something that her kingdom's myths and legends are made of. Only it wasn't a legend, as after calling upon the powers that be, the entire Tibre army is struck dead where they stand-all, that is, except for Stone, a warrior who stirs within Kallista feelings she's never before experienced. Now she's conquered the rival Tibre warriors, but she's left with even more questions than answers. With a mysterious mark on her neck and the brooding Stone, Kallista faces her elders-only to find out that she's been Godstruck, an occurrence that hasn't happened in her nation for over a thousand years. With power beyond belief, Kallista must learn to control the magic that has made her the fulfillment of a prophecy, for she is now the one destined to save her people from the Tibre, and their demon-possessed king. As if defeating the evil king and harnessing her powers weren't enough, the ruler of Adara decrees that all six Godstruck players, not limited to Kallista and Stone, marry and form an instant magical family. They're then ordered to infiltrate the kingdom of Tibre to overthrow its king, and everything that such a coup entails. Gail Dayton has created a magical world unlike anything I've ever experienced. The strange sense of family that abounds in Adara becomes understandable as the story unfolds. The bond that Kallista and Stone share goes beyond mere passion and intertwines with their combined magic. The secondary characters in this book are so real that without them, the book wouldn't be the same. I can honestly say that I'm eagerly anticipating the continuation of this story with the release of THE BARBED ROSE in March of 2006.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2006

    WOW

    i loved this book so much! everybody needs to read it. if u like books like the cry of the icemark or harry potter you should read this book. it's got passion and romance, along with magic and sorcery, What a wonderful combination. i cant wait to ready The Barbed Rose!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    fine sword and sorcery fantasy

    The city of Ukiny in the kingdom of Adara is besieged by warriors of Tibre who depend on cannons, guns, and gunpowder instead of magic to take over the realm. Kallista Varyl, a captain and a naitan (witch) prays to the One for a victory and when she uses her magic, to her amazement every Tibre soldier on Adara is killed except for Stone who is taken prisoner. Both Stone and Kallista are god-marked and as they sail on the same ship to the capital city, they realize something inside them has intrinsically changed. Aisee, a Tibran slave girl attaches herself to Kallista on the boat ride to the capital and once there another god-marked person, the rich merchant Obed finds them. The ruler orders all the players, including Kallista¿s bodyguard married in a special ceremony that will make them an instant family. Kallista acquiesces because she needs all the magic that she can command because her new family is going to the capital city of Tibre to kill the demon that pushed them into going to war.--- THE COMPASS ROSE is a sword and sorcery fantasy that concentrates as much on the characters as it does on the battles. The Adara use magic as another sense believing it is a gift from the One and they are one in harmony with the earth as opposes to the repressive caste society of Tibre. Gail Dayton has created a world that is so colorful and vivid readers will feel they made an adventurous visit to this enchanting realm.--- Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2011

    This is one of my favorites!!

    From beggining to end i fell in love with this book. i have to get a new copy because i have read mine so much that it is falling apart.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2006

    refreshingly original

    I was captivated from page one and just could not put this book down. The characters, although so very different, compliment each other well. Gail Dayton's world of Adaran society and customs is original and refreshingly different from anything I've ever read before.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2005

    Courtesy of Romance Junkies

    Have you ever read a book that immediately wrapped you up in its magic and refused to let you go? That¿s what happened to me with Gail Dayton¿s THE COMPASS ROSE, the first in the One Rose Trilogy. From amazing characterizations to a world unlike any you¿ve read about before, this book takes you straight into the heart of the story and makes you a part of the action, the mystery, the romance, and the unimaginable magic that is the nation of Adara. Kallista Varyl is a Captain in the Adaran army, a woman intent on saving her city from the invading warriors of their neighboring kingdom, Tibre. The army of Tibre, unlike that of Adara, relies on man-made instruments such as guns and cannons to win its battles, instead of the magic that Kallista and her people use. Now, though, outnumbered over ten to one, magic doesn¿t seem to be enough¿until Kallista, in desperation, calls upon a power that was thought to be only legend, and changes the course of history. Kallista, beyond being a warrior, is also a naitan, a magic wielder. Some have even called her a witch. But her normal magic powers aren¿t enough to out-battle and out-smart the hordes of the Tibre army, and so she calls upon the One Goddess, something that her kingdom¿s myths and legends are made of. Only it wasn¿t a legend, as after calling upon the powers that be, the entire Tibre army is struck dead where they stand¿all, that is, except for Stone, a warrior who stirs within Kallista feelings she¿s never before experienced. Now she¿s conquered the rival Tibre warriors, but she¿s left with even more questions than answers. With a mysterious mark on her neck and the brooding Stone, Kallista faces her elders¿only to find out that she¿s been Godstruck, an occurrence that hasn¿t happened in her nation for over a thousand years. With power beyond belief, Kallista must learn to control the magic that has made her the fulfillment of a prophecy, for she is now the one destined to save her people from the Tibre, and their demon-possessed king. As if defeating the evil king and harnessing her powers weren¿t enough, the ruler of Adara decrees that all six Godstruck players, not limited to Kallista and Stone, marry and form an instant magical family. They¿re then ordered to infiltrate the kingdom of Tibre to overthrow its king, and everything that such a coup entails. Gail Dayton has created a magical world unlike anything I¿ve ever experienced. The strange sense of family that abounds in Adara becomes understandable as the story unfolds. The bond that Kallista and Stone share goes beyond mere passion and intertwines with their combined magic. The secondary characters in this book are so real that without them, the book wouldn¿t be the same. I can honestly say that I¿m eagerly anticipating the continuation of this story with the release of THE BARBED ROSE in March of 2006.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2005

    Great

    this book was really good it had humor, romance, and some magic.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2005

    Loved it

    Not only were all the characters uniquely strong and yet vulnrable, but the bonds they form will lead the author to be able to run in some great directions. Absolutely needs a sequal.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2005

    Just Plain Disappointing

    I've never written a review for a published book before but after reading this book, I just had to. The first chapters were amazing and gave me very good expectations that this would easily be one of my favorites. I was wrong. Whatever happened to the good old concepts of love conquering all? Why was it necessary to reward patience and loving from afar with a marriage that would be shared by six practical strangers? In the end, this was a world able to take the reader's mind on an incredible journey with characters worthy of their own stories. Instead they were joined, and suddenly a heroic bodyguard became a foolish dreamer while the heroine, Kallista Varyl, became one of the most confused characters I¿ve ever been introduced to.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)