Competing Voices from Revolutionary Cuba: Fighting Words

Overview

Using a huge array of sources from the political, religious, social, artistic and personal spheres, the story of Cuba, so often linked with the neighbouring US, is set in its historical context and rigorously examined. Issues examined include: the Revolution and upheaval that followed; the Cuban missile crisis; Cuba's position in COMECON; the rise of Cuba's profile in the 1980s; the crisis that followed the dismantling of the USSR; Cuba in the C21st and its future. What has been the price of the Cuban ...

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Overview

Using a huge array of sources from the political, religious, social, artistic and personal spheres, the story of Cuba, so often linked with the neighbouring US, is set in its historical context and rigorously examined. Issues examined include: the Revolution and upheaval that followed; the Cuban missile crisis; Cuba's position in COMECON; the rise of Cuba's profile in the 1980s; the crisis that followed the dismantling of the USSR; Cuba in the C21st and its future. What has been the price of the Cuban revolutionary process? And what faces Cuba in the new millennium?

Using a huge array of sources from the political, religious, social, artistic and personal spheres, the story of Cuba, so often linked with the neighbouring US, is set in its historical context and rigorously examined. Issues examined include: the Revolution and upheaval that followed; the Cuban missile crisis; Cuba's position in COMECON; the rise of Cuba's profile in the 1980s; the crisis that followed the dismantling of the USSR; Cuba in the C21st and its future. What has been the price of the Cuban revolutionary process? And what faces Cuba in the new millennium?

For the last 50 years the story of Cuba has often drawn the eyes of the world - for its part in the missile crisis, or its rise within COMECON, or its controversial relations with other countries. Cuba is seldon out of the news but is always fascinating. Using a wide variety of sources from the political, religious, social, artistic and personal spheres, the story of Cuba is set in its historical context and rigorously examined. Voices from both sides of the Revolution are heard forcing the reader to think again about preconceived ideas for or against recent events. This book examines the reshaping of Cuba following the Revolution, the Bay of Pigs invasion, Cuba's role in the Cold War, the Mariel boatlift, the economic rise and fall given by Cuba's membership of COMECON, the changeability of the ongoing relationship between Cuba and the US; how Cuba coped with the fall of USSR; the Special Period of the 1990s and future that Cuba faces in the new millennium. A wide variety of sources are used including papers from prominent Cubans on both sides of the Revolutionary debate; public figures from Malcolm X to Yuri Gagarin to Pope John Paul II; letters and speeches from politicians ranging from Fidel Castro and Che Guevara to Nikita Khruschev and Gerald Ford; public and private materials from private individuals, governments, the CIA and a wide variety of organisations associated with Cuba. The final chapter draws together all the information and views given to analyse Cuba's recent history, its present situation and its possible future. Issues addressed include Cuba's survival in a post-communistic landscape, human rights issues, the role of Cuban exile groups, the relationship between the US and Cuba and the price paid and benefits derived from the ongoing revolutionary process.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781846450235
  • Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/2009
  • Series: Fighting Words Series
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

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  • Posted September 8, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Useful study of the controversy over Cuba

    This very useful collection presents both sides of the fierce 52-year-old debate over Cuba. After the 1959 revolution, President Kennedy promised on 18 April 1961, "the United States intends no military intervention in Cuba." Yet on 10 April 1962, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff sent a Memo to the Secretary of Defense, "the Joint Chiefs of Staff recommend that a national policy of early military intervention in Cuba be adopted by the United States." In March 1962, the Defense Department presented to the Joint Chiefs what it called 'Pretexts to justify military intervention in Cuba', including: * "A series of well coordinated incidents will be planned to take place in and around Guantanamo to give genuine appearance of being done by hostile Cuban forces." * "We could blow up a US ship in Guantanamo Bay and blame Cuba." * "We could develop a Communist Cuban terror campaign in the Miami area, in other Florida cities and even in Washington." * "A 'Cuban-based, Castro-supported' filibuster could be simulated against a neighboring Caribbean nation." * "It is possible to create an incident which will demonstrate convincingly that a Cuban aircraft has attacked and shot down a chartered civil airliner en route from the United States to Jamaica, Guatemala, Panama or Venezuela." * And, "It is possible to create an incident which will make it appear that Communist Cuban MIGs have destroyed a USAF aircraft over international waters in an unprovoked attack." The US government funds the Cuban American National Foundation, a former CANF board member of which publicly admitted that its leaders created a paramilitary group to destabilise Cuba and to kill Castro. The editors cite a 1986 study, "But we should never lose sight of the fact that the Cuban revolution declared, from the outset, that no one should go malnourished. No disappointment in food production, no failed economic take-off, no shock wave from world economic crisis has deterred Cuba from freeing itself from the suffering and shame of a single wasted child or an elderly person ignominiously subsisting on pet food. No other country in this hemisphere, including the United States, can make this claim. Ending hunger is not the revolution's only accomplishment. The streets of old Havana are no longer lined with prostitutes. A former slave society with many blacks and a history of discrimination, Cuba is now the most racially harmonious society we have ever experienced." In 2001, World Bank President James Wolfensohn praised Cuba: "CuCuba has done a great job on education and health." In 2007 the UN reported that only Cuba in Latin America and the Caribbean met the UN's Millennium Goal for universal education. A 2008 UNESCO survey of 196,000 primary school students in sixteen Latin American countries put Cuba first ahead in mathematics, language and sciences. By 2003, Cuba had the lowest infant mortality rate in Latin America and the Caribbean. In 1958 life expectancy had been 55 years; by 2007 it was 77, seven years more than the regional average. (It is now 78, better than the USA's.) Further, the World Wildlife Fund said that Cuba leads the world in minimising its 'ecological footprint'. In 2008, 265 women were elected to Cuba's National Assembly, 42 per cent of the members, one of the highest proportions in the world. Women hold 66 per cent of professional and technical jobs, and 49 per cent of judges are women.

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