The Complete Book of Breastfeeding

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Overview

The Complete Book of Breastfeeding will help you make the most of your nursing experience. Written by Sally Wendkos Olds, an award-winning medical author who nursed her own three children; Dr. Laura Marks, a pediatrician and breastfeeding authority who nursed her three children; and Dr. Marvin S. Eiger, a pediatrician and former director of a hospital-based lactation program, it provides you with complete information, support, and strategies to make nursing your baby a deeply rewarding part of your life.

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Overview

The Complete Book of Breastfeeding will help you make the most of your nursing experience. Written by Sally Wendkos Olds, an award-winning medical author who nursed her own three children; Dr. Laura Marks, a pediatrician and breastfeeding authority who nursed her three children; and Dr. Marvin S. Eiger, a pediatrician and former director of a hospital-based lactation program, it provides you with complete information, support, and strategies to make nursing your baby a deeply rewarding part of your life.

"...one of the most recognized classics in the field, completely revised and updated, incorporating new AAP guidelines throughout...with expanded sections on nutrition, the role of the father, working mothers, and more."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761151135
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/2/2010
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 161,076
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Laura M. Marks, MD, a pediatrician at Willows Pediatric Group in Westport, Connecticut, breastfed her own three children and is expert at guiding other women through the process.  A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and Yale University School of Medicine, she is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society.  She interned at Harvard University Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, and completed her residency at Children’s Hospital at Yale New Haven Medical Center.

With her husband, David Marks, MD, Dr. Marks coauthored The Headache Prevention Cookbook: Eating Right to Prevent Migraines and Other Headaches. She is the Medical Advisor to the Weston (Connecticut) School District and is on the Pediatric Executive Committee of Norwalk Hospital. Dr. Marks is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics’s Section on Breastfeeding Medicine, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, and La Leche League International.

Sally Wendkos Olds has written extensively about relationships, health, and personal growth. She has won national awards for her writing, including the Career Achievement Award of the American Society of Journalists and Authors, of which she is a member and a past president. Ms. Olds’ college textbooks on child and adult development, co-authored with psychologist Diane E. Papalia, Ph.D., have been read by more than two million students and are the leading texts in their fields. She is also the author of Super Granny: Great Stuff to Do with Your Grandkids, The Working Parents’ Survival Guide, and The Eternal Garden: Seasons of Our Sexuality, and the coauthor of Helping Your Child Find Values to Live By and Raising a Hyperactive Child.

A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ms. Olds is a member of La Leche League International, International Childbirth Education Association, the Authors Guild, and other professional and civic organizations. She nursed her three daughters and is the proud grandmother of five breastfed children. Visit her at her website: www.SallyWendkosOlds.com.

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Read an Excerpt


Introduction

If you were living at some other time or in some other place, you might not need this book. You might even wonder about its purpose, since you would be getting much of the information of these pages from your mother, your aunts, your older sister, and your neighbors. They would share with you their breastfeeding experiences and those of their mothers before them. As you saw them suckling their infants, you would pick up the "tricks of the trade" without even realizing it. It would never occur to you that you would not nurse your baby, because every baby that you had ever seen would have been fed at his mother's breast - except in the extremely rare case when a mother was too ill to nurse.

The paragraph that you have just read appeared as the introduction to the original edition of this book, published in 1972. It is one of the very few paragraphs that were carried over to the second edition, published in 1987, and once again into this edition.

Much has changed in the twenty-six years since The Complete Book of Breastfeeding was first conceived. The year 1971 (when the first edition of this book was being researched and written) marked the lowest rate of breastfeeding in the history of this country: Only one in four women even bean to breastfeed their babies. By 1987, well over half of all American mothers were nursing their newborn infants, and among well-educated middle-class women, the incidence was even higher. There was a slight dip in the prevalence of breastfeeding in the early 1990s, but that reversal has been righted, and the rates of breastfeeding are climbing again.

Over these years we, the authors (a pediatrician who has cared for hundreds of breastfed babies and a medical writer who nursed her own three children), have been delighted to see an explosion of research into the properties of breast milk, the value of nursing for both mothers and babies, and the practices that enhance or hinder the course of breastfeeding.

We have applauded professional organizations like the American Academy of Pediatrics, which in its December 1997 policy statement on breastfeeding acknowledged its great importance and urged doctors to help mothers and babies follow practices to ensure healthy nursing experiences. The Canadian Pediatric Society and the World Health Organization have also issued strong statements urging mothers to nurse and urging medical professionals to help mothers breastfeed their babies.

We've been happy to note that today's physicians learn more about breastfeeding in medical school and are less likely to believe that formula is "just as good" as breast milk, and that more hospitals are instituting more policies that promote breastfeeding rather than interfere with it.

Today, then, if you have questions about breastfeeding, you're more likely to have sources to go to - the doctors, nurses, and midwives who help you in childbirth, the friends and neighbors who are nursing or have nursed their own children, and a wealth of published material. Still, depending on where you live and where you have your baby, the information to get may or may not be helpful.

In too many places you're still likely to hear outdated, incorrect advice. Some medical professionals have not kept up with new research findings about the nutritional and immunological advantages of human milk for infants. Some laypersons, especially those from a generation more familiar with bottle-fed babies, are still convinced of the myths and superstitions they heard in a less enlightened time.

Breastfeeding is easy; there is nothing complicated about it. And there is no single best way to do it. Still, it is a skill that you have to learn, and it is an activity whose success depends on the kind of information and support that you get. Nursing a baby may fulfill and instinctual drive, but both you and your baby need to learn the actual procedures for breastfeeding and need to be reassured while you're learning.

Some mothers intuitively know what to do, puzzled by no questions and troubled by no problems. Most new mothers, however, have questions about all aspects of infant care. Sometimes a lack of information about breastfeeding makes a woman hesitate to embark upon an adventure that seems strange and bewildering. Other times, women reluctantly switch to the bottle when, had their questions been answered and their problems solved, they would have much preferred to continue being part of a nursing couple.

To help you do what you want to do and to make the most of what may be among the most memorable and enjoyable experiences of your entire life, we have once again updated and revised this book. It is very exciting for us to realize that many of the women who are reading this edition of our book are the grown children of our first readers, now nursing their babies. It is always a thrill to have so many women - some of them grandmothers - come up to us at meeting and tell us, "Your book was my bible."

While we thought our book was quite complete when the first edition came out, it included much more in the second edition, and has even more in this third edition: the findings from the most up-to-date scientific research and the results of what so many nursing mothers have learned works well for them. It also addresses a number of lifestyle issues that are increasingly important to contemporary mothers.

Thus, you'll see more in this edition about diet and fitness, about breastfeeding for the working mother (including the best way to express or pump and store breast milk), about breastfeeding as a sexual passage in the life of the mother, about nursing in public and legal issues related to this and other aspects of breastfeeding, and about nursing in a variety of special situations.

Although there is, as we said, no one "best way" to breastfeed, there are certain practices that seem to make the course of nursing go more smoothly for most mothers and babies, and it's these practices that we describe and recommend in these pages. However, every baby is unique, every mother is unique, and every family situation is unique. You may find that you and your baby do better by changing some of our recommendations. If it works for you, do it - and more power to you!

We're really happy that you're beginning this journey, which may be among the most exhilarating of your life, and we hope that this book will help you navigate it smoothly.

The three essential tools for successful breastfeeding are (1) knowing what to do (2) feeling confident that you're doing the right thing for your baby and yourself, and (3) being determined to persist in the face of any minor setbacks that may come your way.

As authors who've learned much more about our subject since we wrote our first book - and then still more since the publication of its second edition - we hope that this newest edition will help you develop all three of these tools.

Excerpted from the Introduction of The Complete Book of Breastfeeding. Copyright (c) 1999 by Marvin S. Eiger, M.D. and Sally Wendkos Olds. Reprinted with permission by Workman Publishing.

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Table of Contents

Introduction xvii

Chapter 1 Will You or Won't You? 1

30-Day Guarantee 2

Why Breastfeed? Why Not? 2

Benefits for the Baby 3

Disadvantages of Formula-Feeding 5

American Academy of Pediatrics Statement on Breastfeeding 7

Some of the Ways Breastfed Babies Differ from Formula-Fed Babies 10

From Sally Olds: A Mother's Enjoyment 16

Importance of Breastfeeding for the Mother 16

The WIC Program 19

When Breastfeeding May Not Be an Option 21

Reasons Women Give for Not Wanting to Breastfeed 22

A History Lesson: How Our Society Has Influenced Women 24

Today's Society and Breastfeeding 25

What Will You Do? 28

Chapter 2 Questions You May Have About Breastfeeding 29

Chapter 3 The Miracle of Lactation 44

The Development of Your Breasts 45

The Anatomy of Your Breasts 49

How Your Baby Gets Your Milk: The Let-Down Reflex 53

Signs of an Active Let-Down Reflex 56

Menstruation, Ovulation, and Pregnancy 57

Human Milk: The Ultimate Health Food 58

Chapter 4 Before Your Baby Comes 63

Choosing Your Health Care Providers 64

Types of Health Care Provider 64

Questions to Ask Health Practitioners 70

Choosing Where You'll Give Birth 74

The Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding in a Baby-Friendly Hospital 76

Packing Your Bag 78

Choosing When You'll Give Birth 79

Prenatal Classes 79

Preparing Your Breasts 80

Who Will Mother You? 83

To Grandmas: How Yon Can Help 85

Chapter 5 Your Baby Is Here 89

The Ideal Beginning 90

Recommendations for Successful Breastfeeding from the American Academy of Pediatrics 91

Breastfeeding in a Hospital or Birthing Center 92

The First Nursing 93

A Gift That You Don't Want 95

Cesarean Birth 96

Mother-Baby Contact 97

Hospital Help 98

Hospital Hindrance 99

Speak Up in the Hospital 100

Newborn Health Measures 101

Chapter 6 Breastfeeding Begins 103

Bringing Your Baby to the Breast: Positive Positioning 104

What Makes a Good Position for Breastfeeding? 107

How Your Baby Gets Your Milk 111

How to Tell When a Baby is Actively Suckling 113

Waking a Sleepy Baby 116

How Frequently Should You Nurse Your New Baby? 117

How Long Should Early Nursing Periods Last? 119

Burping Your Baby 120

Bowel Movements 122

Your Baby's First Posthospital Doctor's Visit 122

Your Baby's Weight After Birth 123

Is My Baby Getting Enough Milk? 124

Judging Intake by Output 125

Jaundice in Infants 127

When to Seek Immediate Help 130

Exclusive Pumping 133

Bottle-Feeding the Breastfed Baby 133

How to Bottle-Feed the Breastfed Baby 134

Chapter 7 You Are a Nursing Family 138

Breastfeeding at Home 140

Tips on Relaxing Before and/or During Feedings 145

The Popular Pacifier 147

If You Have "Too Much" Milk 148

Breast Milk Bonus 148

Babywearing 149

When Your Baby Cries 150

The Colicky Baby 151

Ways to Comfort a Crying Baby 152

Sleeping Arrangements 157

Sleep and Lack of It: Night Feedings 161

Encouraging a Baby to Give Up Nighttime Nursing 162

Ways to Guard Your Rest 164

Diapers, Revisited 165

What Is Your Baby Like? 166

How to Discourage Biting 168

Cutting Down on Spitting Up 170

What Will You Call It? 171

Life as Part of a Nursing Family 171

Chapter 8 Diet, Exercise, and Your Health 172

Diet: What You Eat, What You Drink 173

Guidelines for Healthy Eating 174

The Healthy Eating Pyramid 175

Avoiding Harmful Environmental Substances 182

Losing Weight: How Much, How Soon? 186

What the Labels Usually Mean 187

Exercise: How Much, How Soon? 189

An Exercise Guide for the Nursing Mother 192

How Do You Feel-and Why Do You Feel This Way? 195

Ways to Boost Your Postpartum Morale 198

Differences Between Postpartum Blues and Postpartum Depression 201

Chapter 9 Confident, Comfortable Nursing at Home and Away 203

Care of Your Breasts 204

Finding the Right Nursing Bra 206

How You Look 209

Going Out with Your Baby 212

Nursing in Public 212

Flying with Your Nursing Baby 214

Chapter 10 Drugs and the Nursing Mother 217

Resources and Information about Drugs and Breastfeeding 219

Drugs During Childbirth 220

Medicines 221

Medicines That Can Usually Be Taken Safely by Nursing Mothers 224

Medicines That Should Not Be Taken by Nursing Mothers 225

Medicines That Require a Temporary Cessation of Breastfeeding 226

Medicines of Concern 226

Birth Control 229

Herbs and Other Natural Remedies 229

Recreational and Hard Drugs 230

Minimizing the Effect of Nicotine on Your Nursing Baby 231

Chapter 11 Pumping, Expressing, and Storing Breast Milk 235

What Kind of Pump Do You Need? 236

Choosing a Pump 237

Principles That Apply to All Methods of Collecting Milk 243

A Note of Caution about Bisphenol A (BPA) 245

How to Handle Expressed and Pumped Breast Milk 247

Storing Collected Breast Milk 248

Offering Expressed Milk to Your Baby 251

Chapter 12 The Working Nursing Mother 253

Finding Support 254

Planning Ahead: While You're Pregnant and Still on the Job 255

Employer-Supported Lactation Programs 258

Planning Ahead: While You're on Your Maternity Leave 260

Tips for Feeding a Baby from a Cup 263

Your Baby's Feedings While You're at Work 265

Back at Work 269

Wardrobe Tips for the Working Breastfeeding Mother 272

Chapter 13 Breastfeeding: A Sexual Passage 275

Sexy? Or Not So Sexy? 276

Resuming Sexual Activity 277

Pelvic Floor (Kegel) Exercises 279

You and Your Relationship 281

The Five Phases of Female Sexuality 282

Female Sexuality 282

The Sensuous Nature of Breastfeeding 284

Birth Control 286

Contraception for the Nursing Mother 288

Your Partner Is Still Your Lover 292

Chapter 14 Especially for Dad or Partner 297

Breastfeeding's Benefits for You, the Father 298

Becoming a Father 299

The Father's Importance in the Family 300

Boot Camp for New Dads 302

Your Baby's Mother Is Still Your Lover 304

Rolling Up Your Sleeves 305

How a "Breastfeeding" Father Can Nurture a Baby 306

You Can Be a Complete Father 307

Getting Support for Yourself 309

Chapter 15 Preventing and Treating Nursing-Related Problems 310

Disagreement with Your Doctor 311

Engorgement (Hard, Swollen Breasts) 312

Ways to Relieve Engorgement 313

Sore Nipples 314

Thrush 319

Clogged Duct (Plugged Duct, "Caked" Breasts) 321

Breast Infection (Mastitis) 322

Galactocele (Milk-Retention Cyst) 324

Sudden Increase in Baby's Demand 324

The Baby Who Gains Too Slowly 325

Helping the Older Baby Who Isn't Gaining 326

Nursing Supplementers 328

The Baby Who Gains Too Fast 330

Temporary Rejection of the Breast ("Nursing Strike") 331

When an Older Baby Refuses the Breast 333

Chapter 16 Special Situations 335

Breastfeeding Your Preterm (Premature) Infant 336

Separation of Mother and Baby 346

If Your Baby Gets Sick 346

If You Get Sick 347

If You Have Had Breast Surgery 351

Piercing and Tattooing 353

Twins and More 354

Nursing Through a Pregnancy and Tandem Nursing Afterward 356

Milk Banks 357

Breastfeeding Another Woman's Baby 358

Relactation and Nursing an Adopted Baby 359

Succeeding at Induced Lactation or Relactation 360

Babies with Special Needs 362

Chapter 17 Beyond Breastfeeding 365

Vitamins 366

Recommended Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation for Breastfed Babies 367

Weaning Your Child 368

Extended Breastfeeding 371

"When Are You Going to Stop Nursing?" 372

How Should You Wean? 373

Suggestions for Weaning the Older Child 375

How Weaning Affects You 377

Other Food and Drink 379

Offering Solid Foods 382

Staying Close with Your Child 384

Appendix I Breastfeeding and the Law 385

Appendix II Resource Appendix: Helpful Organizations and Sources of Information 389

Appendix III Website Appendix 401

Appendix IV A Comparison of Cow's Milk And Human Milk 405

Index 408

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Introduction

If you were living at some other time or in some other place, you might not need this book. You might even wonder about its purpose, since you would be getting much of the information of these pages from your mother, your aunts, your older sister, and your neighbors. They would share with you their breastfeeding experiences and those of their mothers before them. As you saw them suckling their infants, you would pick up the "tricks of the trade" without even realizing it. It would never occur to you that you would not nurse your baby, because every baby that you had ever seen would have been fed at his mother's breast - except in the extremely rare case when a mother was too ill to nurse.

The paragraph that you have just read appeared as the introduction to the original edition of this book, published in 1972. It is one of the very few paragraphs that were carried over to the second edition, published in 1987, and once again into this edition.

Much has changed in the twenty-six years since The Complete Book of Breastfeeding was first conceived. The year 1971 (when the first edition of this book was being researched and written) marked the lowest rate of breastfeeding in the history of this country: Only one in four women even bean to breastfeed their babies. By 1987, well over half of all American mothers were nursing their newborn infants, and among well-educated middle-class women, the incidence was even higher. There was a slight dip in the prevalence of breastfeeding in the early 1990s, but that reversal has been righted, and the rates of breastfeeding are climbing again.

Over these years we, the authors (a pediatrician who has cared for hundreds of breastfed babies and a medical writer who nursed her own three children), have been delighted to see an explosion of research into the properties of breast milk, the value of nursing for both mothers and babies, and the practices that enhance or hinder the course of breastfeeding.

We have applauded professional organizations like the American Academy of Pediatrics, which in its December 1997 policy statement on breastfeeding acknowledged its great importance and urged doctors to help mothers and babies follow practices to ensure healthy nursing experiences. The Canadian Pediatric Society and the World Health Organization have also issued strong statements urging mothers to nurse and urging medical professionals to help mothers breastfeed their babies.

We've been happy to note that today's physicians learn more about breastfeeding in medical school and are less likely to believe that formula is "just as good" as breast milk, and that more hospitals are instituting more policies that promote breastfeeding rather than interfere with it.

Today, then, if you have questions about breastfeeding, you're more likely to have sources to go to - the doctors, nurses, and midwives who help you in childbirth, the friends and neighbors who are nursing or have nursed their own children, and a wealth of published material. Still, depending on where you live and where you have your baby, the information to get may or may not be helpful.

In too many places you're still likely to hear outdated, incorrect advice. Some medical professionals have not kept up with new research findings about the nutritional and immunological advantages of human milk for infants. Some laypersons, especially those from a generation more familiar with bottle-fed babies, are still convinced of the myths and superstitions they heard in a less enlightened time.

Breastfeeding is easy; there is nothing complicated about it. And there is no single best way to do it. Still, it is a skill that you have to learn, and it is an activity whose success depends on the kind of information and support that you get. Nursing a baby may fulfill and instinctual drive, but both you and your baby need to learn the actual procedures for breastfeeding and need to be reassured while you're learning.

Some mothers intuitively know what to do, puzzled by no questions and troubled by no problems. Most new mothers, however, have questions about all aspects of infant care. Sometimes a lack of information about breastfeeding makes a woman hesitate to embark upon an adventure that seems strange and bewildering. Other times, women reluctantly switch to the bottle when, had their questions been answered and their problems solved, they would have much preferred to continue being part of a nursing couple.

To help you do what you want to do and to make the most of what may be among the most memorable and enjoyable experiences of your entire life, we have once again updated and revised this book. It is very exciting for us to realize that many of the women who are reading this edition of our book are the grown children of our first readers, now nursing their babies. It is always a thrill to have so many women - some of them grandmothers - come up to us at meeting and tell us, "Your book was my bible."

While we thought our book was quite complete when the first edition came out, it included much more in the second edition, and has even more in this third edition: the findings from the most up-to-date scientific research and the results of what so many nursing mothers have learned works well for them. It also addresses a number of lifestyle issues that are increasingly important to contemporary mothers.

Thus, you'll see more in this edition about diet and fitness, about breastfeeding for the working mother (including the best way to express or pump and store breast milk), about breastfeeding as a sexual passage in the life of the mother, about nursing in public and legal issues related to this and other aspects of breastfeeding, and about nursing in a variety of special situations.

A Note About Language

Since babies come in two sexes, we write about them accordingly, alternating gender pronouns throughout the book. This seems to be the fairest solution to a problem that plagues most writers sensitive to the bias implicit in the English language.

We made another linguistic decision by alternating references to "your husband" "your partner," and "your baby's father." It's likely that most readers of this book are married, but that quite a few are not. You may be living with an adult who is neither your husband nor your baby's father. Or you may be raising your child alone; in this case, you may not be able to get the kind of help that a life partner can provide, and you may need to reach out for help to family members, friends, and members of your community. No matter what your personal situation may be, you can still breastfeed your baby and you can still benefit from most of the suggestions in these pages.

Excerpted from The Complete Book of Breastfeeding. Copyright (c) 1999. Reprinted with permission by Workman Publishing.

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2012

    Used this book as my only reference for exclusively nursing my f

    Used this book as my only reference for exclusively nursing my first babies that were twins. Wonderful book! I buy as baby gifts for my friends who want to breastfeed.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 9, 2012

    Highly recommeded!!

    I used this book for both of my daughters (now 23 and 16). It has been revised several times since I originally used it. I am a pediatric office nurse and constantly recommend this book to my patients who are just starting out. This book is an extremely valuable tool to successfully breastfeed whether it is your first child or your fifth!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2012

    Good book

    It was an ok book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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