The Complete Essays

( 3 )

Overview

In 1572 Montaigne retired from public life and began the reading and writing which were to develop into "assays" of his thoughts and opinions. Nobody in Western civilization had ever tried to do what Montaigne set out to do. In a vivid, contemporary style he surprises us with entertaining quotations; he moves swiftly from thought to thought, often digressing from an idea only to return to it triumphantly, having caught up with it elsewhere, and in so doing leads the reader along the criss-cross paths of a journey...
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Overview

In 1572 Montaigne retired from public life and began the reading and writing which were to develop into "assays" of his thoughts and opinions. Nobody in Western civilization had ever tried to do what Montaigne set out to do. In a vivid, contemporary style he surprises us with entertaining quotations; he moves swiftly from thought to thought, often digressing from an idea only to return to it triumphantly, having caught up with it elsewhere, and in so doing leads the reader along the criss-cross paths of a journey of discovery. Montaigne set out to discover himself. What he discovered instead was the human race.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140446043
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/28/1993
  • Series: Penguin Classics Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 1344
  • Sales rank: 377,236
  • Product dimensions: 5.19 (w) x 7.87 (h) x 2.38 (d)

Meet the Author

M. A. Screech is an emeritus fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is recognized as a world authority on the Renaissance and was inducted into the French Legion of Honor for his translation of Montaigne's Essays.

M. A. Screech is an emeritus fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is recognized as a world authority on the Renaissance and was inducted into the French Legion of Honor for his translation of Montaigne's Essays.

M. A. Screech is an emeritus fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is recognized as a world authority on the Renaissance and was inducted into the French Legion of Honor for his translation of Montaigne's Essays.

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Table of Contents

The Complete Essays Introduction
Note on the Text
The Annotations
Note on the Translation
Explanation of the Symbols
Appendices
To the Reader
Book I
1. We reach the same end by discrepant means
2. On sadness
3. Our emotions get carried away beyond us
4. How the soul discharges its emotions against false objects when lacking real ones
5. Whether the governor of a besieged fortress should go out and parley
6. The hour of parleying is dangerous
7. That our deeds are judged by the intention
8. On idleness
9. On liars
10. On a ready or hesitant delivery
11. On prognostications
12. On constancy
13. Ceremonial at the meeting of kings
14. That the taste of good and evil things depends in large part on the opinion we have of them
15. One is punished for stubbornly defending a fort without good reason
16. On punishing cowardice
17. The doings of certain ambassadors
18. On fear
19. That we should not be deemed happy till after our death
20. To philosophize is to learn how to die
21. On the power of the imagination
22. One man's profit is another man's loss
23. On habit: and on never easily changing a traditional law
24. Same design: differing outcomes
25. On schoolmasters' learning
26. On educating children
27. That it is madness to judge the true and the false from our own capacities
28. On affectionate relationships
29. Nine and twenty sonnets of Estienne de La Bo√ętie
30. On moderation
31. On the Cannibals
32. Judgements on God's ordinances must be embarked upon with prudence
33. On fleeing from pleasures at the cost of one's life
34. Fortune is often found in Reason's train
35. Something lacking in our civil administrations
36. On the custom of wearing clothing
37. On Cato the Younger
38. How we weep and laugh at the same thing
39. On solitude
40. Reflections upon Cicero
41. On not sharing one's fame
42. On the inequality there is between us
43. On sumptuary laws
44. On sleep
45. On the Battle of Dreux
46. On names
47. On the uncertainty of our judgement
48. On war-horses
49. On ancient customs
50. On Democritus and Heraclitus
51. On the vanity of words
52. On the frugality of the Ancients
53. On one of Caesar's sayings
54. On vain cunning devices
55. On smells
56. On prayer
57. On the length of life

Book II
1. On the inconstancy of our actions
2. On drunkenness
3. A custom of the Isle of Cea
4. "Work can wait till tomorrow"
5. On conscience
6. On practice
7. On rewards for honour
8. On the affection of fathers for their children
9. On the armour of the Parthians
10. On books
11. On cruelty
12. An apology for Raymond Sebond
13. On judging someone else's death
14. How our mind tangles itself up
15. That difficulty increases desire
16. On glory
17. On presumption
18. On giving the lie
19. On freedom of conscience
20. We can savour nothing pure
21. Against indolence
22. On riding "in post"
23. On bad means to a good end
24. On the greatness of Rome
25. On not pretending to be ill
26. On thumbs
27. On cowardice, the mother of cruelty
28. There is a season for everything
29. On virtue
30. On a monster-child
31. On anger
32. In defence of Seneca and Plutarch
33. The tale of Spurina
34. Observations on Julius Caesar's methods of waging war
35. On three good wives
36. On the most excellent of men
37. On the resemblance of children to their fathers

Book III
1. On the useful and the honourable
2. On repenting
3. On three kinds of social intercourse
4. On diversion
5. On some lines of Virgil
6. On coaches
7. On high rank as a disadvantage
8. On the art of conversation
9. On vanity
10. On restraining your will
11. On the lame
12. On physiognomy
13. On experience

Index

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2004

    irritating

    I tried to read this version of montaigne, but try as I might I couldn't get past all the little numbers that riddled the pages of this text. They continually distracted my eyes and made my reading bumpy and irregular.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    This is a book of about life

    The book covers a vast array of topics and is a bridge between thoughts of the Greece-Roman world and the present. Written over 400 years ago the thoughts are relevant for all times. His insight into human nature and behaviour are truly remarkable and I have rarely enjoyed any book as much as Montaigne.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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