The Complete Guide to Relieving Cancer Pain and Suffering

Overview

Most cancer patients fear unremitting pain more than the prospect of an untimely death, and are surprised to learn that most of the pain and related symptoms of cancer can be successfully addressed by an informed patient working with a determined health care team. This book helps you be that informed patient.
Thoroughly revising their widely praised 1994 book, You Don't Have to Suffer, Dr. Richard B. Patt and Susan Lang offer a much-needed handbook for patients and caregivers on...

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Complete Guide to Relieving Cancer Pain and Suffering

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Overview

Most cancer patients fear unremitting pain more than the prospect of an untimely death, and are surprised to learn that most of the pain and related symptoms of cancer can be successfully addressed by an informed patient working with a determined health care team. This book helps you be that informed patient.
Thoroughly revising their widely praised 1994 book, You Don't Have to Suffer, Dr. Richard B. Patt and Susan Lang offer a much-needed handbook for patients and caregivers on all aspects of cancer pain. The authors identify the reasons why patients are so often under-medicated—from patients who feel the need to tough it out to doctors buried in time-consuming paperwork—and argue that properly medicated patients are better able to resume active lives and marshal strength to fight their disease, while those in chronic pain not only suffer, but also jeopardize their recovery. They demonstrate methods that can be used to cope with the practical aspects of dealing with cancer suffering (like talking to your doctor and loved ones), and describe all of the pain-relieving options available in the modern medical arsenal—from drugs and high-tech medical procedures to psychological and cognitive techniques. The authors also discuss depression and other psychological components that can contribute to suffering, and explain how psychological, cognitive, and mind/body techniques can help relieve the suffering associated with cancer. The book includes detailed charts of all the pain medications presently available and it lists many available resources, from pain specialists to hospice and home care.
This volume will empower cancer patients to make informed decisions about their care and will be of enormous value to the growing number of patients, family members, and health-care professionals determined to relieve needless suffering.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Cancer patients and their caregivers will find a wealth of information in this thoroughly revised edition of the authors' You Don't Have To Suffer (1994). Patt (president & chief medical officer, Patt Ctr. for Cancer Pain & Wellness, Houston) and science writer Lang (Cornell Univ. News Svc.) cover every aspect of cancer pain management, from pain undermanagement and the quality-of-life benefits of properly managed pain to types and causes of cancer pain, pain assessment, and medications. Also addressed are high-tech interventions, such as implantable pumps and nerve blocks; nondrug approaches, including relaxation and biofeedback; the special problems of pain in children, teens, and the elderly; psychological aspects; and comfort to the dying. Hints on choosing a physician and being an assertive consumer, as well as examples of documents (e.g., living wills) and extensive appendixes, empower patients and caregivers. As the authors point out, it is estimated that some 40 percent of cancer patients receive inadequate pain relief, so this book has a potentially large audience. Highly recommended.-Jodith Janes, Cleveland Clinic Fdn. Lib., OH Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
"A well-written and comprehensive handbook for cancer patients and their caregivers. This will be an invaluable resource for people caring for patients with cancer and pain, particularly if they are being managed at home. The information is well set-out and clearly explained, and there is a glossary of medical terms included."—Roger Woodruff, Director of Palliative Care, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia, International Association for Hospice and Pallative Care

"A much-needed resource for patients and caregivers on all aspects of cancer pain. The authors demonstrate methods that can be used to cope with the practical aspects of dealing with cancer suffering, describe all of the pain-relieving options available in the modern medical arsenal, discuss depression and other psychological components that can contribute to suffering, and explain how psychological, cognitive, and mind/body techniques can help relieve the suffering associated with cancer. This volume will help cancer patients make informed decisions about their care and will be of enormous value to the growing number of patients, family members, and health care professionals determined to relieve needless suffering."—Cornell University College of Human Ecology (online review)

"I cannot imagine a more complete treatment of the subject, written in truly accessible language, and with open discussion of contentious issues. The book is aimed at patients and carers, and I would also strongly recommend it to those who support and advise patients. If one could be reassured that each clinician on the cancer pathway has taken in the core messages put forward by the authors, the daunting prospect of pain at the end of life, one of every patient's greatest fears, would be somewhat lessened. This is a book that every informed patient and carer should know about, and which should be on the library shelves of every cancer support group."—R. Wilson, Annals of Oncology

"Cancer patients and their caregivers will find a wealth of information in this thoroughly revised edition of the authors' You Don't Have to Suffer. Patt and science writer Lang cover every aspect of cancer pain management, from pain undermanagement and the quality-of-life benefits of properly managed pain to types and causes of cancer pain, pain assessment, and medications.... Hints on choosing a physician and being an assertive consumer, as well as examples of documents (e.g. living wills) and extensive appendixes, empower patients and caregivers. As the authors point out, it is estimated that some 40 percent of cancer patients receive inadequate pain relief, so this book has a potentially large audience. Highly recommended."—Library Journal

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195312027
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 11/28/2006
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 6.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard B. Patt, M.D. spent two years directing the medical care of all inpatients at the world-renowned Hospice at the Texas Medical Center and is now President and Chief Medical Officer of the Patt Center for Cancer Pain and Wellness (www.cancerpain.org) in Houston. He served as the Deputy Chief of the Pain and Symptom Management Section of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center and was the founder of the Cancer Pain Program at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. Susan S. Lang is a Senior Science Writer at Cornell University News Service and the author or co-author of eleven books, including Headache Help.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
A note for chronic pain sufferers who don't have cancer
Pt. I Cancer and its pain
1 How cancer pain undermines health and treatment 3
2 Understanding cancer and pain 27
3 Assessing pain and planning treatment strategies 54
4 On being an active health care consumer 85
Pt. II The painkillers
5 Understanding medications used to treat mild pain 97
6 Understanding medications used to treat moderate pain 121
7 Understanding medications used to treat severe pain 135
8 Understanding how adjuvant drugs relieve pain and suffering 171
9 High-tech options 212
Pt. III Other approaches and concerns
10 Dealing with constipation, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting 231
11 Dealing with other side effects and discomforts 248
12 Mind-body approaches to easing pain 279
13 Special cases : children, the elderly, and patients with special needs 306
14 Dealing with feelings 318
15 If death approaches 345
App. 1 Where to find more information 365
App. 2 Common drugs used for cancer pain and foreign names for the drugs 379
App. 3 Detailed relaxation instructions 384
App. 4 Planning for your mental and physical health care and treatment 389
Notes 406
Glossary 1 Pain and cancer terms 410
Glossary 2 Terms associated with end-of-life issues and care 418
Selected bibliography 421
Index 430
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