The Complete Guide to the Learning Styles InService System / Edition 1

The Complete Guide to the Learning Styles InService System / Edition 1

by Rita Stafford Dunn, Rita Dunn, Kenneth Dunn
     
 

ISBN-10: 0205274412

ISBN-13: 9780205274413

Pub. Date: 12/23/1998

Publisher: Pearson

Renowned experts on learning styles, Drs. Rita and Kenneth Dunn show staff developers how to use teachers' learning styles in in-service programs so they can model alternative strategies for their students. Step-by-step procedures help in-service coordinators assist in retraining professional teachers. This book clearly describes the problems

Overview

Renowned experts on learning styles, Drs. Rita and Kenneth Dunn show staff developers how to use teachers' learning styles in in-service programs so they can model alternative strategies for their students. Step-by-step procedures help in-service coordinators assist in retraining professional teachers. This book clearly describes the problems educators face with schooling and inservice, and details the concept of learning styles. Practical help is provided for identifying learning styles, and understanding and using global and analytic approaches to inservice. The reader will learn how to design tactical and kinesthetic resources, activity packages, programmed learning sequences for inservice, and how to manage their implementation. Providing step-by-step instruction, topics include: What Can Be Done to Improve Teaching Quickly? and What Is Learning Style? This book is for practicing and prospective educational leaders and teachers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780205274413
Publisher:
Pearson
Publication date:
12/23/1998
Pages:
226
Product dimensions:
9.27(w) x 7.01(h) x 0.71(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
1 Required: A Totally New System of Inservice Rita Dunn
1(10)
Problems with Teacher Education and Inservice Programs
1(7)
1. Lack of Research-Based Instruction
1(1)
2. Widespread Acceptance of Fads
1(1)
3. Lack of Support and Follow-Through after Inservice
2(1)
4. Reliance on Individuals Rather Than Groups
3(1)
5. Lack of Sufficient Time
3(1)
6. Teachers' Lack of Research Skills
3(1)
7. Limitations of Certain Teacher Education Programs
4(1)
8. Lack of Teacher Training Responsiveness to External Agencies
4(1)
9. Lack of Respect for State Education Department Personnel
4(1)
10. Quality of Teacher Applicants
5(1)
11. Disparate Criteria for Determining Teaching Excellence
5(1)
12. Urban Schools and Minority Students
5(1)
13. Special Education and the Need for Inservice
6(1)
14. Lack of Student Discipline and/or Motivation
6(1)
15. Children Taking Prescription Medications
7(1)
16. Cultural Diversity and Immigrant Populations
7(1)
17. Lack of Knowledge about the Differences between the Academically Able and the Academically at Risk
8(1)
What Can Be Done to Improve Teacher and Inservice Education?
8(1)
How Do We Know That Inservice Conducted through Teachers' Learning Styles Will Be More Effective Than What We Currently Do?
9(1)
Conclusion
10(1)
2 Introduction to Learning Styles Rita Dunn
11(19)
What Is Learning Style?
11(1)
What Are the Elements of Learning Style?
12(8)
Environmental Elements: Acoustics, Illumination, Temperature, and Seating Design
13(1)
Emotional Elements: Motivation, Persistence, Responsibility (Conformity/Nonconformity), and Structure
13(1)
People Patterns--Sociological Elements: Learning Independently with One or More Colleagues, or with Either a Collegial or an Authoritative Adult
14(1)
Physiological Elements--Perceptual Preferences: Time of Day, Intake, and Need for Mobility versus Passivity
15(5)
Global versus Analytic Processing Element
20(1)
Theoretical Cornerstone of the Dunn and Dunn Model
20(1)
How Do People's Learning Styles Differ?
21(8)
Learning Styles Differ by Achievement Levels
21(1)
Learning Styles Differ by Gender
22(1)
Learning Styles Differ by Age
23(6)
Processing-Style Preferences
29(1)
Conclusion
29(1)
3 Identifying Participants' Learning Styles Rita Dunn
30(8)
Identifying Adults' Learning Styles
30(4)
Curry's Onion Model of Learning and Cognitive Style
30(1)
Instruments for Identifying Adults' Learning Styles
31(3)
Which Learning-Style Elements Must Be Accommodated?
34(4)
4 Global and Analytic Approaches to Inservice Kenneth Dunn
38(8)
Identifying Processing Style
38(2)
Listening to the Words of Global and Analytic Processors
40(1)
General Inservice Approaches
41(1)
What Is Needed for Analytic and Global Learners
41(1)
Inservice Directions for Analytic Processors
41(1)
Inservice Directions for Global Processors
42(1)
What Analytic and Global Processors Respond to and What Demotivates Each Group
43(1)
Circles of "Unhappiness" for Global and Analytic Learners
43(2)
Negatives for Globals
43(1)
Negatives for Analytics
44(1)
Helping Globals to Get Organized
44(1)
Using a More Analytic Approach
44(1)
Conclusion
45(1)
5 Small-Group Techniques for Inservice Workshops Kenneth Dunn
46(11)
Workshop Outlines
46(3)
One-Day Outline
47(1)
One-Week Outline
47(2)
Advantages of Small-Group Techniques
49(1)
Designing a Team Learning for Inservice Workshops
50(2)
Designing a Circle of Knowledge for Inservice Workshops
52(2)
Designing Brainstorming Sessions for Inservice Workshops
54(1)
Setting
54(1)
Procedures
54(1)
Conclusion
55(2)
6 Designing Tactual Resources Kenneth Dunn
57(15)
Advantages of Tactual Inservice Resources
57(1)
Beginning the Design Process
58(13)
Designing Tactual Strategies
58(1)
Using Task Cards and Pic-A-Holes to Present New Material
58(5)
Using Flip Chutes and Electroboards to Present New Material
63(8)
Board Games
71(1)
Conclusion
71(1)
7 Designing Kinesthetic Resources for Inservice Kenneth Dunn
72(13)
Advantages of Kinesthetic Instructional Resources for Inservice
73(1)
Beginning the Design Process
73(1)
Objective: Improving Computer Skills
74(1)
Kinesthetic Game Example: Computer Keyboard Floor Game
74(1)
Objective: Learning the Placement of Keys on the Computer Keyboard
75(1)
Objective: Learning the Function Keys
75(1)
Designing Facts Games: Baseball and Balloon Race
75(1)
Objective: Teaching Key Communication Phrases to Students Who Have Limited English Proficiency
75(1)
Objective: Learning about the Cultural Differences of New Immigrants
76(1)
Designing Role-Playing Strategies
76(1)
Objective: Teaching Practical Spanish
76(1)
Objective: Making Shakespeare Real
77(1)
Releasing Creativity--Club Improv(isation)
77(1)
Learning by Doing
77(7)
Objective: Room Redesign
77(6)
Objective: Adding Variety
83(1)
Becoming Part of the Thing to Be Learned
84(1)
Conclusion
84(1)
8 Designing Contract Activity Packages for Inservice Rita Dunn
85(35)
For Whom Are CAPs Effective?
88(1)
Sound
88(1)
Light, Temperature, Seating, Intake, and Sociological Preferences
89(1)
Structure, Mobility, and Responsibility (Conformity/Nonconformity)
89(1)
Processing Style
89(1)
Designing a Contract Activity Package (CAP)
89(9)
Step 1: Identify the Content and Develop an Analytic Title
90(1)
Step 2: Develop a Humorous or Clever Global Subtitle
90(2)
Step 3: Decide on the Purpose of the Inservice-What Do You Want Participants to Learn?
92(1)
Step 4: Translate What Needs to Be Learned into Straightforward Objectives
92(1)
Step 5: Establish Diverse Activity Alternatives and Permit Choices
93(1)
Step 6: Establish Diverse Reporting Alternatives and Allow Choices
93(1)
Step 7: Develop Multisensory Resource Alternatives
94(2)
Step 8: Develop at Least Three Small-Group Techniques
96(1)
Step 9: Develop an Assessment Directly Related to the Inservice Objectives
97(1)
Step 10: Develop a Cover for the CAP
97(1)
Step 11: Develop an Informational Top Sheet
97(1)
Step 12: Reread and Correct the CAP
97(1)
Step 13: Illustrate the CAP Pages
97(1)
Step 14: Reproduce the CAP
98(1)
Step 15: Develop a Brief Evaluation of Participants Reactions to the CAP
98(1)
Step 16: Keep a Record of Who Uses the CAP
98(1)
Step 17: Implement the First Inservice CAP
98(1)
Special Guidelines for Perfecting a CAP
98(2)
Sample CAP
100(20)
9 Designing Programmed Learning Sequences for Inservice Rita Dunn
120(48)
Learning-Styles Characteristics Responsive to Programmed Learning Sequences (PLS)
121(1)
Designing a Programmed Learning Sequence
121(9)
Step 1: Identify the Topic
122(1)
Step 2: Create an Analytic and a Global Title
122(1)
Step 3: Design a Shaped Cover
122(1)
Step 4: Identify the Objectives
123(1)
Step 5: Explain the Directions for Use
124(1)
Step 6: Begin with a Brief Global Opening
124(2)
Step 7: Identify the Specific Content
126(1)
Step 8: Develop Questions and Possible Answers or Fill-Ins
126(1)
Step 9: Outline a Plan
126(1)
Step 10: Create Separate Frames
127(1)
Step 11: Design an Appropriate Shape
127(1)
Step 12: Proofread the Text Carefully
127(1)
Step 13: Check the Sequence of Frames and Personalize Each Frame
127(1)
Step 14: Edit
127(1)
Step 15: Review Vocabulary
128(1)
Step 16: Reread the Frames
128(1)
Step 17: Add Illustrations
128(1)
Step 18: Audiotape Each Frame for Auditory Learners
128(1)
Step 19: Field-Test
128(1)
Step 20: Revise and Refine
128(1)
Step 21: Paginate
128(1)
Step 22: Duplicate
129(1)
Step 23: Laminate
129(1)
Step 24: Add Tactual Reinforcement Frames
129(1)
Step 25: Field-Test Again
129(1)
Step 26: Add Covers
129(1)
Step 27: Add Global and Analytic Titles
129(1)
Sample Programmed Learning Sequence
130(36)
Conclusion
166(1)
Notes
167(1)
10 Learning-Styles Inservice: Managing the Implementation Rita Dunn
168(11)
Alternative Stages and Steps
168(8)
Stage 1
169(2)
Stage 2
171(1)
Stage 3
172(2)
Stage 4: Addressing Structure and Persistence Preferences
174(1)
Stage 5
175(1)
Evaluate Your Learning-Style Inservice
176(1)
Sample Inservice Agenda
176(1)
Conclusion
177(2)
References 179(26)
Appendix A: Research Award Winners 205(2)
Appendix B: Research Concerned with Learning Styles and Environmental Preferences 207(4)
Appendix C: Research Concerned with the Emotional Elements of Learning Styles 211(2)
Appendix D: Experimental Research Concerned with Learning Styles and Sociological Preferences 213(2)
Appendix E: Experimental Research Concerned with Perceptual Preferences 215(4)
Appendix F: Experimental Research Concerned with Learning Styles and Time of Day, Intake, and Mobility Preference 219(4)
Index 223

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