The Complete Idiot's Guide to Shamanism

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Shamanism

4.5 2
by Gini Graham Scott, Stanley Krippner
     
 

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You’re no idiot, of course. You know that shamans are also known as medicine men and women, who use the power of the mind and call on spiritual helpers to heal the afflicted. However, this ancient art has been put to more modern uses, including problem solving, empowerment, and personal mastery.

But you don’t have to trek through steamy Amazonian

Overview

You’re no idiot, of course. You know that shamans are also known as medicine men and women, who use the power of the mind and call on spiritual helpers to heal the afflicted. However, this ancient art has been put to more modern uses, including problem solving, empowerment, and personal mastery.

But you don’t have to trek through steamy Amazonian jungles or frigid Siberian tundra to become enlightened in the ways of shamanism! The Complete Idiot’s to Shamanism will show exactly how to discover your own shamanic power—and how that power will guide you in your everyday life! In this Complete Idiot’s , you get:

—Shamanic history—from its origins in Paleolithic times to its spreading influence today.

—Power animals—where to locate them and how they communicate with you.

—How to take a shamanic journey—traveling through the Lower, Upper, and Middle Worlds, and exploring your past or future.

—Shamanic healing techniques in use with modern medicine.

 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780028643649
Publisher:
Alpha Books
Publication date:
06/28/2002
Series:
Complete Idiot's Guide Series
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
7.26(w) x 10.98(h) x 0.72(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Gini Graham Scott, Ph.D., is the author of 35 books including The Power of Fantasy, Mind Your Own Business: The Battle for Personal Privacy, Secrets of the Shaman, Shamanism and Personal Mastery, Shamanism for Everyone, and Shaman Warrior. She has appeared on such television programs as Oprah, CNN Talk Back Live, and The O’Reilly Factor.

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The Complete Idiot's Guide to Shamanism 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a good introduction to Shamanism culturally, as well as a good introduction the every day use of the Shaman(ist)ic technique. In 'Part 1' of this book, the author explains where the word Shaman originated, and then procedes to tell about 'Shamans' in many different cultures. She cites different cultures and how they used Shamanism in the past and how it is used today. She does an excellent job warning about 'commercialized' Shamanism and plastic Shamans. 'Part 2' still contains information on different cultures and introduces some Shamanic technique. The author introduces practices, but I feel like they are oversimplified. Because they are generic though, it gives the reader the ability to adapt the techniques to their own beliefs if they feel they would like to use them. The author does an excellent job of presenting information, as well as giving her own opinion. Both of which she generally keeps separate from each other. Many books I've read let the opinion of the author overshadow the information presented in the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read a couple other books about shamanism and while they were very well done, I found myself getting confused by some of the terminology the authors used. This book gets away from the terminology (and explains virtually all terms in a great glossary at the book's end) and explains topics and concepts about shamanism in a way that any layperson can understand. Topics like 'shamanic journeys,' 'power animals,' 'Upper, Middle & Lower Worlds' are all explained in great detail. She also discusses the history of shamanism and describes shamanism in different cultures. While native American shamanism may share some concepts with Siberian shamanism for example, there are also enough differences between the two to clearly set them apart. And while Ms Scott is able to 'de-mystify' a lot of shamnaistic concepts, she also raises concerns about those who are trying to 'commercialize' shamanism for their own personal gains or those who claim to be 'shamans,' without going through a lot of the training usually required to be one. I've read a couple of Ms Scott's other books on other subjects and had no idea she had also written other books on shamanism. I felt she did a wonderful job writing this one, which I felt was an excellent overall introduction to this world. While one book does not make you an 'expert' in any kind of field, Scott has a bibliography that allows the reader to find other related books that will further their education in this area. Ms Scott has done a wonderful job in introducing the topic of shamanism to the general public.