The Complete Plato

The Complete Plato

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by PLATO
     
 

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THE ARTS IN EDUCATION
(SOCRATES, ADEIMANTUS.)
Such, then, I said, are our principles of theology—some tales are to be told, and others are not to be told to our disciples from their youth upward, if we mean them to honor the gods and their parents, and to value friendship with one another.
Yes; and I think that our principles are right, he said.
But if

Overview

THE ARTS IN EDUCATION
(SOCRATES, ADEIMANTUS.)
Such, then, I said, are our principles of theology—some tales are to be told, and others are not to be told to our disciples from their youth upward, if we mean them to honor the gods and their parents, and to value friendship with one another.
Yes; and I think that our principles are right, he said.
But if they are to be courageous, must they not learn other lessons beside these, and lessons of such a kind as will take away the fear of death? Can any man be courageous who has the fear of death in him?
Certainly not, he said.
And can he be fearless of death, or will he choose death in battle rather than defeat and slavery, who believes the world below to be real and terrible?
Impossible.
Then we must assume a control over the narrators of this class of tales as well as over the others, and beg them not simply to revile, but rather to commend the world below, intimating to them that their descriptions are untrue, and will do harm to our future warriors.
That will be our duty, he said.
Then, I said, we shall have to obliterate many obnoxious passages, beginning with the verses
"I would rather be a serf on the land of a poor and portionless man than rule over all the dead who have come to naught."
We must also expunge the verse which tells us how Pluto feared
"Lest the mansions grim and squalid which the gods abhor should be seen both of mortals and immortals."
And again:

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940148920533
Publisher:
Hillside Publishing
Publication date:
01/13/2015
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Plato (Greek: Pláton, "wide, broad-shouldered") (428/427 BC – 348/347 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, the second of the great trio of ancient Greeks –Socrates, Plato, originally named Aristocles, and Aristotle– who between them laid the philosophical foundations of Western culture. Plato was also a mathematician, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the western world. Plato is widely believed to have been a student of Socrates and to have been deeply influenced by his teacher's unjust death. Plato's brilliance as a writer and thinker can be witnessed by reading his Socratic dialogues. Some of the dialogues, letters, and other works that are ascribed to him are considered spurious. Plato is thought to have lectured at the Academy, although the pedagogical function of his dialogues, if any, is not known with certainty. They have historically been used to teach philosophy, logic, rhetoric, mathematics, and other subjects about which he wrote. Source: Wikipedia
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Complete Plato 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No canonical page numbers. Not suitable for academic use.
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PerryStroika More than 1 year ago
No table of contents. Terrible pagination. Almost unuseable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
such a great book