The Complete Stories [NOOK Book]

Overview


Winner of the National Book Award

The publication of this extraordinary volume firmly established Flannery O'Connor's monumental contribution to American fiction. There are thirty-one stories here in all, including twelve that do not appear in the only two story collections O'Connor put together in her short lifetime--Everything That Rises Must Converge and A Good Man Is ...
See more details below
The Complete Stories

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - First Edition)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview


Winner of the National Book Award

The publication of this extraordinary volume firmly established Flannery O'Connor's monumental contribution to American fiction. There are thirty-one stories here in all, including twelve that do not appear in the only two story collections O'Connor put together in her short lifetime--Everything That Rises Must Converge and A Good Man Is Hard to Find.

O'Connor published her first story, "The Geranium," in 1946, while she was working on her master's degree at the University of Iowa. Arranged chronologically, this collection shows that her last story, "Judgement Day"--sent to her publisher shortly before her death—is a brilliantly rewritten and transfigured version of "The Geranium." Taken together, these stories reveal a lively, penetrating talent that has given us some of the most powerful and disturbing fiction of the twentieth century. Also included is an introduction by O'Connor's longtime editor and friend, Robert Giroux.

Winner of the 1972 National Book Award

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"What we lost when she died is bitter. What we have is astonishing: the stories burn brighter than ever, and strike deeper." —Walter Clemons, Newsweek
Library Journal
It is nearly impossible to read Carlene Bauer’s Frances and Bernard and not wonder about the works Bauer is referencing. For those who want to read actual work by O’Connor and Lowell, these two collections are great launch points. The short stories of O’Connor won her the National Book Award and provide a good overview of her potent, brutal, and powerful writing. They are arranged in chronological order so Bauer’s readers can speculate on which stories Frances and Bernard may have been discussing. Robert Lowell’s massive Collected Poems is also structured chronologically and takes readers through his development and interests as a poet. However, for readers who want to jump around, “For the Union Dead,” “The Quaker Graveyard in Nantucket,” and “Waking Early Sunday Morning” are three of his most iconic poems.

(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781466829022
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publication date: 1/1/1971
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 576
  • Sales rank: 22,284
  • File size: 601 KB

Meet the Author


Flannery O'Connor was born in Savannah, Georgia, in 1925. When she died at the age of thirty-nine, America lost one of its most gifted writers at the height of her powers.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Introduction by Robert Giroux

The Geranium
The Barber
Wildcat
The Crop
The Turkey
The Train
The Peeler
The Heart of the Park
A Stroke of Good Fortune
Enoch and the Gorilla
A Good Man Is Hard to Find
A Late Encounter with the Enemy
The Life You Save May Be Your Own
The River
A Circle in the Fire
The Displaced Person
A Temple of the Holy Ghost
The Artificial Nigger
Good Country People
You Can't Be Any Poorer Than Dead
Greenleaf
A View of the Woods
The Enduring Chill
The Comforts of Home
Everything That Rises Must Converge
The Partridge Festival
The Lame Shall Enter First
Why Do the Heathen Rage?
Revelation
Parker's Back
Judgement Day
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 24 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(17)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2005

    The Most Accomplished American Short Story Writer

    When I was an English major in college, I studied Flannery O'Connor and wrote a thesis on her work. At first, I thought her work was very offputting because some of her stories were grotesque and preachy. Then I began to realize her genius: The ability to portray ordinary people who undergo extraordinary changes in their lives. Her stories are gems of revelation, straddling mystery and manners.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2007

    Flannery O'Connor is incredible

    Flannery O'Connor's dark tales tell stories that plumb the depths of human nature. Far from a shallow portrait of humanity, O'Connor sees right through our dissembling and points to the true problem. She is the closest thing to a truly great writer America has had for many years. Her stories are witty, horrifying, and brilliant.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 5, 2013

    WOW! WOW! WOW!

    What a collection of stories! Well written, usually very light and humorous. Then a knockout punch that leaves you dazed.

    Some may find the prolific use of the N-word offensive, but it probably captures the South at that period. Others also may say there are critiques of the religious, but I say it merely captures the Southern nature at that time. All humanity, across all cultures and time periods, shows the same brutality and small mindedness.

    Some stories will ruin you for a day with their blowaway ending.

    Very powerful, very good, a must read. And I have 150 pages to go.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    O'Connor is a lost treasure~

    I have not ready any of Flannery O'Connor's work prior to purchasing this collection, and boy - what I have been missing! This is a complete collection of all of her shot stories, including ones that have not been published in book form before. Each story is unique, and sends you on a journey that can be sometimes sad, echantingm and even shocking! Definite one for anyone who loves a great short story. Can not put it down - wish she had written more.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2014

    Highly Recommended

    Excellent writing, character studies -

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 30, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Wonderful collection

    If you love Flannery O'Connor's short stories, get this book. She remains one of America's finest writers and her tales never get old. "Parker's Back", "Revelation", "Good Country People", "A Good Man is Hard to Find", and many others are in this collection. GET IT, READ IT, LOVE IT!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2004

    Unimpressed.

    I am not impressed by her stories and takes an unrealistic and a shallow approach to humanity.

    0 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)