Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age

Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age

by Christopher Kutz
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0521039703

ISBN-13: 9780521039703

Pub. Date: 08/27/2007

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

We live in a morally flawed world. Our lives are complicated by what other people do, and by the harms that flow from our social, economic, and political institutions. Our relations as individuals to these collective harms constitute the domain of complicity. This book examines the relationship between collective responsibility and individual guilt. It presents a

Overview

We live in a morally flawed world. Our lives are complicated by what other people do, and by the harms that flow from our social, economic, and political institutions. Our relations as individuals to these collective harms constitute the domain of complicity. This book examines the relationship between collective responsibility and individual guilt. It presents a rigorous philosophical account of the nature of our relations to the social groups in which we participate, and uses that account in a discussion of contemporary moral theory.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521039703
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
08/27/2007
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Law Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
344
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     xi
Introduction     1
The Deep Structure of Individual Accountability     17
Introduction     17
Social accountability as an example of the fundamentally relational nature of accountability     20
The relational bases of moral accountability: conduct, consequences, and character     25
A complication: the dynamics of accountability     46
The irreducibility of accountability     49
Ethical functionalism without consequentialism     53
Nietzsche's challenge     56
Legal accountability and the limits of response     59
Conclusion     64
Acting Together     66
Introduction     66
Methodology: generality, reducibility, and functionalism     68
Collective action as intentional participation     74
The contributory content of participatory intentions     81
The reducibility of collective action to individual intention     85
Collective action: the minimalist approach     89
Participation and the perspective of command     96
Ascribing collective actions     103
Attributing collective intentions     107
Conclusion     112
Moral Accountabilityand Collective Action     113
Introduction     113
Common sense and the disappearance of moral accountability: Dresden     115
The inadequacy of moral theory to collective wrongdoing: individual consequentialism     124
The incompatibility of collective consequentialism and individual accountability     129
Kantian universalization and marginal contributions     133
Understanding collective action and individual accountability     138
Conclusion     144
Complicitous Accountability     146
Introduction     146
Whether complicit actors are less culpable than direct actors     147
Conclusion     164
Problematic Accountability: Facilitation, Unstructured Collective Harm, and Organizational Dysfunction     166
Introduction     166
Complicity without participation     168
Collective accountability and holistic responses     191
Conclusion     202
Complicity, Conspiracy, and Shareholder Liability     204
Introduction     204
Epistemic constraints upon legal accountability     206
Criminal complicity doctrine and the scope of liability     209
Justifying complicitous accountability     220
Against the limited civil liability of shareholders     236
Conclusion     253
Conclusion: Accountability and the Possibility of Community     254
Notes     261
Bibliography     311
Index     325

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