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Comprehensive Curriculum for Gifted Learners / Edition 3

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Overview

Comprehensive Curriculum for Gifted Learners provides a theoretical, research-based framework and practical ideas for writing, implementing, and adapting curriculum for gifted learners in a standards-based era.

Readers are first introduced to various curriculum theories, the Integrated Curriculum Model, curriculum reform, and a process for curriculum design and development, culminating in examples of key curriculum products.

Specific core subject areas and non-core subject areas (including thinking skills, creativity, leadership, and the arts) are addressed with practical examples and connections to standards with adaptations for gifted learners. At-risk populations, connections to technology, interdisciplinary approaches, assessment options, and instructional and classroom management strategies are also emphasized and discussed in detail.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205388653
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 7/27/2005
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 325,025
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Table of Contents

I. THE PROCESS OF CURRICULUM MAKING.

1. Curriculum for the Gifted: Past, Present, and Future Directions.

a. The forces that drive curriculum.

b. A curriculum philosophy for the gifted.

c. Research on curriculum for the gifted.

d. Curriculum dimensions for the gifted:

i. Content.

ii. Process/Product.

iii. Epistemological/Concept.

e. Conclusion.

f. Questions for discussion.

g. References.

2. Curriculum Design Issues in Developing a Curriculum for the Gifted.

a. Gifted learner characteristics: A prelude to differentiated curriculum dimensions.

b. Content, process/product, and concept dimensions.

c. The Integrated Curriculum Model.

d. Accommodations for individual differences.

e. Assessment: Measuring student outcomes.

f. Conclusion.

g. Questions for discussion.

h. References.

3. Curriculum Development Processes.

a. The process of curriculum development.

b. Gifted program goals.

c. Perspectives on the needs of the field.

d. Collaboration in curriculum development.

e. Testing the curriculum.

f. Professional development.

g. Checklist of curriculum principles for use in developing gifted/talented programs.

h. Conclusion.

i. Questions for discussion.

j. References.

4. Developing Key Curriculum Products.

a. Scope and sequence development.

b. Developing individualized educational plans (IEP) for gifted learners.

c. Effective implementation through collaboration.

d. Alignment to standards.

e. Curriculum writing: Unit development.

f. Conclusion.

g. Questions for discussion.

h. References.

i. Appendices.

II. ADAPTING CURRICULUM TO GIFTED LEARNER NEEDS IN CORE DOMAINS.

5. Differentiation Curriculum: The Process.

a. What is a differentiated curriculum?

b. Application features of a differentiated curriculum.

c. Conclusion.

d. References.

6. Reading and Language Arts Curriculum for the Gifted Learner.

a. Considerations for teaching and learning reading and language arts.

b. Connectivity to standards in reading and language arts.

c. Interdisciplinary connections in reading and language arts.

d. Accommodating at-risk gifted students.

e. Programming considerations.

f. Conclusion.

g. Questions for discussion.

h. References.

7. Language Study for Gifted Learners.

a. Considerations for teaching and learning in language studies.

b. Interdisciplinary connections via foreign languages.

c. Accommodating at-risk gifted learners.

d. Programming considerations.

e. Conclusion.

f. Questions for discussion.

g. References.

8. Mathematics Curriculum for the Gifted Learner.

a. Connections for teaching and learning mathematics.

b. Connectivity to standards in mathematics.

c. Interdisciplinary connections in mathematics.

d. Accommodating at-risk populations in mathematics.

e. Considerations for implementing programs for the mathematically gifted.

f. Conclusion.

g. Questions for discussion.

h. References.

9. Social Studies Curriculum and the Gifted Learner.

a. Considerations for teaching and learning social studies.

b. Connectivity to standards in social studies.

c. Interdisciplinary connections in social studies.

d. Accommodating at-risk populations in social studies.

e. Considerations for the implementation of gifted programs.

f. Conclusion.

g. Questions for Discussion.

h. References.

10. Science Curriculum for the Gifted.

a. Considerations for teaching and learning in science.

b. Connectivity to standards in science.

c. Interdisciplinary connections.

d. Accommodating at-risk populations in science.

e. Considerations for implementing gifted programs in science.

f. Conclusion.

g. Questions for discussion.

h. References.

III. ADAPTING CURRICULUM TO GIFTED LEARNER NEEDS IN NON-CORE DOMAINS.

11. Leadership Curriculum for the Gifted.

a. Leadership and intelligence: Is there a relationship?

b. Curriculum within the cognitive domains.

c. Transferring curriculum activities to the leadership domain.

d. Applications for leadership within the context of the classroom.

e. Conclusion.

f. Questions for discussion.

g. References.

12. Arts Curriculum for the Gifted.

a. Differentiating curriculum in the arts.

b. Use of arts standards by the gifted community.

c. The relationship of the arts to cognition.

d. The role of the arts in affective development.

e. Aesthetic experiences for enhancing instructional processes.

f. Curriculum integration in the arts.

g. Conclusion.

h. Questions for discussion.

i. References.

13. Affective Curriculum and Instruction for Gifted Learners.

a. Affective components in a gifted curriculum.

b. Emotional intelligence.

c. Learner characteristics of low income and minority students.

d. Tailoring affective curriculum and instruction for low income and minority students.

e. Conclusion.

f. Questions for discussion.

14. Developing Interdisciplinary Curriculum through Humanities Study.

a. The teaching of concepts.

b. The study of philosophy.

c. Key questions regarding the humanities.

d. The learner in the context of the humanities.

e. Creativity in the humanities curriculum.

f. Issues in implementing interdisciplinary curricula for the gifted.

g. Selected materials for use in humanities programs for the gifted.

h. Conclusion.

i. Questions for discussion.

j. References.

15. Accommodating Special Populations of Gifted Students through Tailored Curriculum Experiences.

a. Twice-labeled gifted.

b. The learning disabled gifted student.

c. AD/HD and gifted.

d. Implications for curriculum and classroom management.

e. Underrepresented gifted learners.

f. Considerations for curriculum and programming.

g. The underachieving gifted learner.

h. Conclusion.

i. Questions for discussion.

j. References.

IV. SCAFFOLDING INSTRUCTION TO SUPPORT DIFFERENTIATED CURRICULUM.

16. Teaching Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving and Research.

a. Use of models.

b. Problem solving.

c. Creative problem solving.

d. Metacognition.

e. Teaching research.

f. Metacognitive aspects of thinking.

g. Constructing thinking skill programs in schools.

h. Conclusion.

i. Questions for discussion.

j. References.

17. Teaching Creativity.

a. Use of models.

b. Description of skills.

c. Description of mentors.

d. Applications of creativity to curriculum and instruction.

e. The teaching of creativity.

f. Use of creativity instruments with at-risk gifted populations.

g. Issues in teaching creativity.

h. Conclusion.

i. Questions for discussion.

j. References.

18. Using Technology to Supplement Gifted Curriculum.

a. Research and rationale for gifted learners and differentiation.

b. Technology options that support gifted student needs and characteristics.

c. Software and the gifted child.

d. Hardware and the gifted child.

e. Using technology to support teacher and parents of gifted children.

f. Considerations in using technology with the gifted.

g. Conclusion.

h. Questions for discussion.

i. References.

19. Instructional Strategies in Programs for the Gifted.

a. A model for applying strategies in gifted classrooms.

b. Question-asking strategies and models: The Socratic method.

c. Productive complex strategies.

d. Project work.

e. Reading strategies across the curriculum.

f. Homework as a deliberate strategy.

g. Computer based learning.

h. Consultation and collaborative approaches.

i. Conclusion.

j. Questions for discussion.

k. References.

20. Instructional Management Strategies for Effective Curriculum Implementation.

a. Grouping.

b. Acceleration.

c. Diagnostic-prescriptive approaches and compacting.

d. Time management.

e. Anchor activities.

f. Learning centers.

g. Record keeping.

h. Questions for discussion.

i. References.

V. THE PROCESS OF CURRICULUM CHANGE.

21. Assessment of Gifted Student Learning.

a. Problems in assessing gifted student learning.

b. Assessing learning through multiple approaches.

c. On-level standardized assessment.

d. Portfolios.

e. Performance assessment.

f. Curriculum evaluation.

g. Utility of results.

h. Conducting curriculum evaluations.

i. Conclusion.

j. Questions for discussion.

k. References.

l. Appendices.

22. Educational Leadership in Gifted Programs.

a. What matters in effective instructional leadership?

b. Leadership for gifted: Leading in the middle.

c. Leadership for gifted: Making change happen.

d. Specific suggestions for systemic change and growth in gifted programs.

e. Conclusion.

f. Questions for discussion.

g. References.

23. Toward Synthesis: A Vision of Comprehensive Articulated Curriculum for Gifted Learners.

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