Computer Networks / Edition 5

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Overview

Computer Networks, 5/e is appropriate for Computer Networking or Introduction to Networking courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, CIS, MIS, and Business Departments.

Tanenbaum takes a structured approach to explaining how networks work from the inside out. He starts with an explanation of the physical layer of networking, computer hardware and transmission systems; then works his way up to network applications. Tanenbaum's in-depth application coverage includes email; the domain name system; the World Wide Web (both client- and server-side); and multimedia (including voice over IP, Internet radio video on demand, video conferencing, and streaming media. Each chapter follows a consistent approach: Tanenbaum presents key principles, then illustrates them utilizing real-world example networks that run through the entire book—the Internet, and wireless networks, including Wireless LANs, broadband wireless and Bluetooth. The Fifth Edition includes a chapter devoted exclusively to network security. The textbook is supplemented by a Solutions Manual, as well as a Website containing PowerPoint slides, art in various forms, and other tools for instruction, including a protocol simulator whereby students can develop and test their own network protocols.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A textbook providing a clear explanation of the way networks work, from hardware technology up through the most popular network applications. Topics covered include the physical layer (copper, fiber, radio, and satellite communication); the data link layer (protocol principles, HDLC, SLIP, and PPP); the MAC sublayer (IEEE 802 LANs, bridges, new high-speed LANs); the network layer (routing, congestion control, internetworking, IPv6); the transport layer (transport protocol principles, TCP, network performance); and the application layer (cryptography, email, news, the Web, Java, and multimedia). Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Don Bryson

Gee, I Didn't Know That ...

I evaluate every computer book by how many hours it will save me. If it takes twenty hours to read book, then I fully expect it to save me at least twenty hours of frustrated guessing. I'm a businessman first and a hacker second. Everything must have an ROI (Return On Investment).

Computer Networks won't save one minute over the next year. It has no step-by-step procedures, no problem solving sections, and no butt-saving tricks. The only purpose it can serve at a downed site is as a shield against thrown objects from frustrated users. Normally, theoretical books like this one receive a quick skim and are promptly sent to my for-looks-only tome tomb. However, this isn't a normal theoretical book. It's fascinating. In fact, I read it not once but three times. Tanenbaum fills over 700 pages with everything I didn't know, or better still, only thought I knew about networks.

For example, let me tell you what Tanenbaum taught me about modems. I have over ten years trench tech UNIX experience. I've hooked up thousands of modems. I've written more chat scripts, custom dialers, and inittab entries than I have sense to count. I even silently considered myself a modem expert -- before reading Tanenbaum's book.

Being the "expert" that I was, I had used the term carrier many times. I had also used that term many times before my computer days. I worked my way through college at a commercial broadcast station. A broadcast transmitter superimposes audio onto a sine wave called the carrier. However, until I read Computer Networks, I never made the connection between modems and transmitters. Tanenbaum points out that a modem works very much like a commercial transmitter and then proceeds to describe the different types of modem modulation in amazingly great detail. I no longer consider myself a modem expert.

That's why I read this book three times. I learned something new on every page and unlearned at least one misunderstanding in every chapter. I saw the gestalt between seemingly dissimilar things like modems and radio stations. The breadth and depth of the book yielded fresh fruit on every reading.

The book is well organized. Tanenbaum uses a modified ISO OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) reference model as a template for the book. While he drops the session and presentation layers, he leaves the physical, data link, network, transport, and application layers in his reference model. The explanation starts with the physical layer in chapter two and ends with the application layer in the last chapter. This bottom-up explanation is logical and easy to follow.

While the concepts could have been explained with the warmth of a legal brief, Tanenbaum has a gift for explaining them in an entertaining, conversational manner. True, everything must have an ROI. Sometimes, however, when it's entertaining enough, the sole joy of learning is enough of a return.--Dr. Dobb's Electronic Review of Computer Books.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132126953
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 10/15/2010
  • Series: Pearson Custom Computer Science Series
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 960
  • Sales rank: 417,864
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew S. Tanenbaum is a Professor of Computer Science at Vrije Universiteteit, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He is a fellow of IEEE and ACM and a member of the Netherlands Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences. He recently won a prestigious European Research Council Advanced Grant of 2.5 million to do research on highly reliable computer systems. Tanenbaum has also authored or coauthored the following titles: Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition; Operating Systems: Design and Implementation, Third Edition; and Distributed Systems: Principles and Paradigms, Second Edition, all published by Prentice Hall.

David J. Wetherall is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. He hails from Australia and has worked in the area of networking for the past two decades. His research is focused on Internet protocols, wireless networks, and security. Wetherall's work has been recognized with a Sloan Fellowship, the IEEE Bennett Prize, and the ACM SIGCOMM Test-of-Time Award.

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Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 USES OF COMPUTER NETWORKS

1.1.1 Business Applications

1.1.2 Home Applications

1.1.3 Mobile Users

1.1.4 Social Issues

1.2 NETWORK HARDWARE

1.2.1 Personal Area Networks

1.2.2 Local Area Networks

1.2.3 Metropolitan Area Networks

+1.2.4 Wide Area Networks

1.2.5 Internetworks

1.3 NETWORK SOFTWARE

1.3.1 Protocol Hierarchies

1.3.2 Design Issues for the Layers

1.3.3 Connection-Oriented Versus Connectionless Service

1.3.4 Service Primitives

1.3.5 The Relationship of Services to Protocols

1.4 REFERENCE MODELS

1.4.1 The OSI Reference Model

1.4.2 The TCP/IP Reference Model

1.4.3 The Model Used in this Book

**1.4.4 A Comparison of the OSI and TCP/IP Reference Models

**1.4.5 A Critique of the OSI Model and Protocols

**1.4.6 A Critique of the TCP/IP Reference Model

1.5 EXAMPLE NETWORKS

+1.5.1 The Internet

+**1.5.2 Third-Generation Mobile Phone Networks

+**1.5.3 Wireless LANs: 802.11

++**1.5.4 RFID and Sensor Networks

**1.6 NETWORK STANDARDIZATION

**1.6.1 Who's Who in the Telecommunications World

**1.6.2 Who's Who in the International Standards World

**1.6.3 Who's Who in the Internet Standards World

1.7 METRIC UNITS

1.8 OUTLINE OF THE REST OF THE BOOK

1.9 SUMMARY

CHAPTER 2 THE PHYSICAL LAYER

2.1 THE THEORETICAL BASIS FOR DATA COMMUNICATION

2.1.1 Fourier Analysis

2.1.2 Bandwidth-Limited Signals

2.1.3 The Maximum Data Rate of a Channel

2.2 GUIDED TRANSMISSION MEDIA

2.2.1 Magnetic Media

2.2.2 Twisted Pairs

2.2.3 Coaxial Cable

++2.2.4 Power Lines

2.2.5 Fiber Optics

2.3 WIRELESS TRANSMISSION

+2.3.1 The Electromagnetic Spectrum

2.3.2 Radio Transmission

+2.3.3 Microwave Transmission

+**2.3.4 Infrared Transmission

+**2.3.5 Light Transmission

**2.4 COMMUNICATION SATELLITES

**2.4.1 Geostationary Satellites

**2.4.2 Medium-Earth Orbit Satellites

**2.4.3 Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

**2.4.4 Satellites Versus Fiber

2.5 DIGITAL MODULATION AND MULTIPLEXING

++2.5.1 Baseband Transmission

++2.5.2 Passband Transmission

+2.5.3 Frequency Division Multiplexing

2.5.4 Time Division Multiplexing

+2.5.5 Code Division Multiplexing

2.6 THE PUBLIC SWITCHED TELEPHONE NETWORK

2.6.1 Structure of the Telephone System

2.6.2 The Politics of Telephones

+2.6.3 The Local Loop: Modems, ADSL, and Fiber

2.6.4 Trunks and Multiplexing

2.6.5 Switching

**2.7 THE MOBILE TELEPHONE SYSTEM

**2.7.1 First-Generation (1G) Mobile Phones: Analog Voice

**2.7.2 Second-Generation (2G) Mobile Phones: Digital Voice

+**2.7.3 Third-Generation (3G) Mobile Phones: Digital Voice and Data

**2.8 CABLE TELEVISION

**2.8.1 Community Antenna Television

**2.8.2 Internet over Cable

**2.8.3 Spectrum Allocation

**2.8.4 Cable Modems

**2.8.5 ADSL Versus Cable

2.9 SUMMARY

CHAPTER 3 THE DATA LINK LAYER

3.1 DATA LINK LAYER DESIGN ISSUES

3.1.1 Services Provided to the Network Layer

3.1.2 Framing

3.1.3 Error Control

3.1.4 Flow Control

+3.2 ERROR DETECTION AND CORRECTION

+3.2.1 Error-Correcting Codes

+3.2.2 Error-Detecting Codes

3.3 ELEMENTARY DATA LINK PROTOCOLS

3.3.1 A Utopian Simplex Protocol

3.3.2 A Simplex Stop-and-Wait Protocol for an Error-Free Channel

3.3.3 A Simplex Stop-and-Wait Protocol for a Noisy Channel

3.4 SLIDING WINDOW PROTOCOLS

3.4.1 A One-Bit Sliding Window Protocol

3.4.2 A Protocol Using Go-Back-N

3.4.3 A Protocol Using Selective Repeat

3.5 EXAMPLE DATA LINK PROTOCOLS

++3.5.1 Packet over SONET

++3.5.2 ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Loop)

3.6 SUMMARY

CHAPTER 4 THE MEDIUM ACCESS CONTROL SUBLAYER

4.1 THE CHANNEL ALLOCATION PROBLEM

4.1.1 Static Channel Allocation

4.1.2 Assumptions for Dynamic Channel Allocation

4.2 MULTIPLE ACCESS PROTOCOLS

4.2.1 ALOHA

4.2.2 Carrier Sense Multiple Access Protocols

+4.2.3 Collision-Free Protocols

4.2.4 Limited-Contention Protocols

4.2.5 Wireless LAN Protocols

4.3 ETHERNET

4.3.1 Classic Ethernet Physical Layer

4.3.2 Classic Ethernet MAC Sublayer Protocol

4.3.3 Ethernet Performance

4.3.4 Switched Ethernet

4.3.5 Fast Ethernet

+4.3.6 Gigabit Ethernet

+4.3.7 10 Gigabit Ethernet

4.3.8 Retrospective on Ethernet

4.4 WIRELESS LANS

4.4.1 The 802.11 Architecture and Protocol Stack

+4.4.2 The 802.11 Physical Layer

+4.4.3 The 802.11 MAC Sublayer Protocol

4.4.4 The 802.11 Frame Structure

4.4.5 Services

+**4.5 BROADBAND WIRELESS

+**4.5.1 Comparison of 802.16 with 802.11 and 3G

+**4.5.2 The 802.16 Architecture and Protocol Stack

+**4.5.3 The 802.16 Physical Layer

+**4.5.4 The 802.16 MAC Sublayer Protocol

+**4.5.5 The 802.16 Frame Structure

**4.6 BLUETOOTH

**4.6.1 Bluetooth Architecture

**4.6.2 Bluetooth Applications

**4.6.3 The Bluetooth Protocol Stack

**4.6.4 The Bluetooth Radio Layer

**4.6.5 The Bluetooth Link Layers

**4.6.6 The Bluetooth Frame Structure

++**4.7 RFID

++**4.7.1 EPC Gen 2 Architecture

++**4.7.2 EPC Gen 2 Physical Layer

++**4.7.3 EPC Gen 2 Tag Identification Layer

++**4.7.4 Tag Identification Message Formats

4.8 DATA LINK LAYER SWITCHING

4.8.1 Uses of Bridges

+4.8.2 Learning Bridges

+4.8.3 Spanning Tree Bridges

4.8.4 Repeaters, Hubs, Bridges, Switches, Routers, and Gateways

+4.8.5 Virtual LANs

4.9 SUMMARY

CHAPTER 5 THE NETWORK LAYER

5.1 NETWORK LAYER DESIGN ISSUES

5.1.1 Store-and-Forward Packet Switching

5.1.2 Services Provided to the Transport Layer

5.1.3 Implementation of Connectionless Service

5.1.4 Implementation of Connection-Oriented Service

5.1.5 Comparison of Virtual-Circuit and Datagram Networks

5.2 ROUTING ALGORITHMS

5.2.1 The Optimality Principle

5.2.2 Shortest Path Algorithm

5.2.3 Flooding

5.2.4 Distance Vector Routing

5.2.5 Link State Routing

5.2.6 Hierarchical Routing

5.2.7 Broadcast Routing

+5.2.8 Multicast Routing

++**5.2.9 Anycast Routing

5.2.10 Routing for Mobile Hosts

**5.2.11 Routing in Ad Hoc Networks

5.3 CONGESTION CONTROL ALGORITHMS

5.3.1 Approaches to Congestion Control

5.3.2 Traffic-Aware Routing

5.3.3 Admission Control

5.3.4 Traffic Throttling

+5.3.5 Load Shedding

5.4 QUALITY OF SERVICE

5.4.1 Application Requirements

+5.4.2 Traffic Shaping

+5.4.3 Packet Scheduling

+5.4.4 Admission Control

5.4.5 Integrated Services

5.4.6 Differentiated Services

5.5 INTERNETWORKING

5.5.1 How Networks Differ

5.5.2 How Networks Can Be Connected

+5.5.3 Tunneling

+5.5.4 Internetwork Routing

+5.5.5 Packet Fragmentation

5.6 THE NETWORK LAYER IN THE INTERNET

5.6.1 The IP Version 4 Protocol

+5.6.2 IP Addresses

**5.6.3 IP Version 6

+5.6.4 Internet Control Protocols

5.6.5 Label Switching and MPLS

+5.6.6 OSPF--An Interior Gateway Routing Protocol

+5.6.7 BGP--The Exterior Gateway Routing Protocol

**5.6.8 Internet Multicasting

**5.6.9 Mobile IP

5.7 SUMMARY

CHAPTER 6 THE TRANSPORT LAYER

6.1 THE TRANSPORT SERVICE

6.1.1 Services Provided to the Upper Layers

6.1.2 Transport Service Primitives

6.1.3 Berkeley Sockets

6.1.4 An Example of Socket Programming: An Internet File Server

6.2 ELEMENTS OF TRANSPORT PROTOCOLS

6.2.1 Addressing

6.2.2. Connection Establishment

6.2.3 Connection Release

6.2.4 Flow Control and Buffering

6.2.5 Multiplexing

6.2.6 Crash Recovery

++6.3 CONGESTION CONTROL ALGORITHMS

++6.3.1 Desirable Bandwidth Allocation

++6.3.2 Regulating the Sending Rate

++6.3.3 Wireless Issues

6.4 THE INTERNET TRANSPORT PROTOCOLS: UDP

6.4.1 Introduction to UDP

**6.4.2 Remote Procedure Call

+6.4.3 The Real-Time Transport Protocol

6.5 THE INTERNET TRANSPORT PROTOCOLS: TCP

6.5.1 Introduction to TCP

6.5.2 The TCP Service Model

6.5.3 The TCP Protocol

6.5.4 The TCP Segment Header

6.5.5 TCP Connection Establishment

6.5.6 TCP Connection Release

6.5.7 TCP Connection Management Modeling

6.5.8 TCP Transmission Policy

6.5.9 TCP Timer Management

++6.5.10 TCP Congestion Control

++6.5.11 The Future of TCP

**6.6 PERFORMANCE ISSUES

**6.6.1 Performance Problems in Computer Networks

**6.6.2 Network Performance Measurement

**6.6.3 Host Design for Fast Networks

**6.6.4 Fast Segment Processing

++**6.6.5 Header Compression

**6.6.6 Protocols for Long Fat Networks

++**6.7 DELAY TOLERANT NETWORKS

++**6.7.1 DTN Architecture

++**6.7.2 The Bundle Protocol

6.8 SUMMARY

CHAPTER 7 THE APPLICATION LAYER

7.1 DNS--THE DOMAIN NAME SYSTEM

7.1.2 The DNS Name Space

7.1.3 Resource Records

7.1.4 Name Servers

+**7.2 ELECTRONIC MAIL

+**7.2.1 Architecture and Services

+**7.2.2 The User Agent

**7.2.3 Message Formats

+**7.2.4 Message Transfer

+**7.2.5 Final Delivery

+7.3 THE WORLD WIDE WEB

+7.3.1 Architectural Overview

+7.3.2 Static Web Pages

+7.3.3 Dynamic Web Pages and Web Applications

+7.3.4 HTTP--The HyperText Transfer Protocol

+**7.3.5 Mobile Web

++**7.3.6 Web Search

7.4 REALTIME AUDIO AND VIDEO

7.4.1 Introduction to Digital Audio

7.4.2 Audio Compression

7.4.3 Streaming Audio

7.4.4 Internet Radio

7.4.5 Voice over IP

7.4.6 Introduction to Video

7.4.7 Video Compression

7.4.8 Video on Demand

++7.5 CONTENT DELIVERY AND PEER-TO-PEER

++7.5.1 Server Replication

++7.5.2 Content Delivery Networks

++7.5.3 Peer-to-Peer Networks

++7.5.4 Overlay Networks

7.5 SUMMARY

CHAPTER 8 NETWORK SECURITY

8.1 CRYPTOGRAPHY

8.1.1 Introduction to Cryptography

8.1.2 Substitution Ciphers

8.1.3 Transposition Ciphers

8.1.4 One-Time Pads

8.1.5 Two Fundamental Cryptographic Principles

8.2 SYMMETRIC-KEY ALGORITHMS

8.2.1 DES--The Data Encryption Standard

8.2.2 AES--The Advanced Encryption Standard

8.2.3 Cipher Modes

8.2.4 Other Ciphers

8.2.5 Cryptanalysis

8.3 PUBLIC-KEY ALGORITHMS

8.3.1 RSA

8.3.2 Other Public-Key Algorithms

8.4 DIGITAL SIGNATURES

8.4.1 Symmetric-Key Signatures

8.4.2 Public-Key Signatures

8.4.3 Message Digests

8.4.4 The Birthday Attack

8.5 MANAGEMENT OF PUBLIC KEYS

8.5.1 Certificates

8.5.2 X.509

8.5.3 Public Key Infrastructures

8.6 COMMUNICATION SECURITY

8.6.1 IPsec

+8.6.2 Firewalls

+8.6.3 Virtual Private Networks

+8.6.4 Wireless Security

8.7 AUTHENTICATION PROTOCOLS

8.7.1 Authentication Based on a Shared Secret Key

**8.7.2 Establishing a Shared Key: The Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange

**8.7.3 Authentication Using a Key Distribution Center

+**8.7.4 Authentication Using Kerberos

8.7.5 Authentication Using Public-Key Cryptography

**8.8 EMAIL SECURITY

**8.8.1 PGP--Pretty Good Privacy

**8.8.2 S/MIME

8.9 WEB SECURITY

8.9.1 Threats

8.9.2 Secure Naming

8.9.3 SSL--The Secure Sockets Layer

+8.9.4 Mobile Code Security

8.10 SOCIAL ISSUES

8.10.1 Privacy

8.10.2 Freedom of Speech

8.10.3 Copyright

8.11 SUMMARY

CHAPTER 9 READING LIST AND BIBLIOGRAPHY

**9.1 SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING

**9.1.1 Introduction and General Works

**9.1.2 The Physical Layer

**9.1.3 The Data Link Layer

**9.1.4 The Medium Access Control Sublayer

**9.1.5 The Network Layer

**9.1.6 The Transport Layer

**9.1.7 The Application Layer

**9.1.8 Network Security

++9.2 ALPHABETICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

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Preface

Preface

This book is now in its fourth edition. Each edition has corresponded to a different phase in the way computer networks were used. When the first edition appeared in 1980, networks were an academic curiosity. When the second edition appeared in 1988, networks were used by universities and large businesses. When the third edition appeared in 1996, computer networks, especially the Internet, had become a daily reality for millions of people. The new item in the fourth edition is the rapid growth of wireless networking in many forms.

The networking picture has changed radically since the third edition. In the mid-1990s, numerous kinds of LANs and WANs existed, along with multiple protocol stacks. By 2003, the only wired LAN in widespread use was Ethernet, and virtually all WANs were on the Internet. Accordingly, a large amount of material about these older networks has been removed.

However, new developments are also plentiful. The most important is the huge increase in wireless networks, including 802.11, wireless local loops, 2G and 3G cellular networks, Bluetooth, WAP, i-mode, and others. Accordingly, a large amount of material has been added on wireless networks. Another newly-important topic is security, so a whole chapter on it has been added.

Although Chap. 1 has the same introductory function as it did in the third edition, the contents have been revised and brought up to date. For example, introductions to the Internet, Ethernet, and wireless LANs are given there, along with some history and background. Home networking is also discussed briefly.

Chapter 2 has been reorganized somewhat. After a brief introduction to the principles of datacommunication, there are three major sections on transmission (guided media, wireless, and satellite), followed by three more on important examples (the public switched telephone system, the mobile telephone system, and cable television). Among the new topics covered in this chapter are ADSL, broadband wireless, wireless MANs, and Internet access over cable and DOCSIS.

Chapter 3 has always dealt with the fundamental principles of point-to-point protocols. These ideas are essentially timeless and have not changed for decades. Accordingly, the series of detailed example protocols presented in this chapter is largely unchanged from the third edition.

In contrast, the MAC sublayer has been an area of great activity in recent years, so many changes are present in Chap. 4. The section on Ethernet has been expanded to include gigabit Ethernet. Completely new are major sections on wireless LANs, broadband wireless, Bluetooth, and data link layer switching, including MPLS.

Chapter 5 has also been updated, with the removal of all the ATM material and the addition of additional material on the Internet. Quality of service is now also a major topic, including discussions of integrated services and differentiated services. Wireless networks are also present here, with a discussion of routing in ad hoc networks. Other new topics include NAT and peer-to-peer networks.

Chap. 6 is still about the transport layer, but here, too, some changes have occurred. Among these is an example of socket programming. A one-page client and a one-page server are given in C and discussed. These programs, available on the book's Web site, can be compiled and run. Together they provide a primitive remote file or Web server available for experimentation. Other new topics include remote procedure call, RTP, and transaction/TCP.

Chap. 7, on the application layer, has been more sharply focused. After a short introduction to DNS, the rest of the chapter deals with just three topics: e-mail, the Web, and multimedia. But each topic is treated in great detail. The discussion of how the Web works is now over 60 pages, covering a vast array of topics, including static and dynamic Web pages, HTTP, CGI scripts, content delivery networks, cookies, and Web caching. Material is also present on how modern Web pages are written, including brief introductions to XML, XSL, XHTML, PHP, and more, all with examples that can be tested. The wireless Web is also discussed, focusing on i-mode and WAP. The multimedia material now includes MP3, streaming audio, Internet radio, and voice over IP.

Security has become so important that it has now been expanded to a complete chapter of over 100 pages.

It covers both the principles of security (symmetric- and public-key algorithms, digital signatures, and X.509 certificates) and the applications of these principles (authentication, e-mail security, and Web security). The chapter is both broad (ranging from quantum cryptography to government censorship) and deep (e.g., how SHA-1 works in detail).

Chapter 9 contains an all-new list of suggested readings and a comprehensive bibliography of over 350 citations to the current literature. Over 200 of these are to papers and books written in 2000 or later.

Computer books are full of acronyms. This one is no exception. By the time you are finished reading this one, the following should ring a bell: ADSL, AES, AMPS, AODV, ARP, ATM, BGP, CDMA, CDN, CGI, CIDR, DCF, DES, DHCP, DMCA, FDM, FHSS, GPRS, GSM, HDLC, HFC, HTML, HTTP, ICMP, IMAP, ISP, ITU, LAN, LMDS, MAC, MACA, MIME, MPEG, MPLS, MTU, NAP, NAT, NSA, NTSC, OFDM, OSPF, PCF, PCM, PGP, PHP, PKI, POTS, PPP, PSTN, QAM, QPSK, RED, RFC, RPC, RSA, RSVP, RTP, SSL, TCP, TDM, UDP, URL, UTP, VLAN, VPN, VSAT, WAN, WAP, WDMA, WEP, WWW, and XML. But don't worry. Each will be carefully defined before it is used.

To help instructors using this book as a text for a course, the author has prepared various teaching aids, including

  • A problem solutions manual.
  • Files containing the figures in multiple formats.
  • PowerPoint sheets for a course using the book.
  • A simulator (written in C) for the example protocols of Chap. 3.
  • A Web page with links to many tutorials, organizations, FAQs, etc.

The solutions manual is available directly from Prentice Hall (but only to instructors, not to students).

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