×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Computer Security for the Home and Small Office
     

Computer Security for the Home and Small Office

4.0 1
by Thomas Greene
 

Computer Security for the Home and Small Office addresses the long-neglected security needs of everyday users in the home, company workstation, and SOHO (small office/home office) categories, with emphasis on system hardening, eliminating malware, user and Internet privacy, encryption, and data hygiene.

The book offers comprehensive tutorials for

Overview

Computer Security for the Home and Small Office addresses the long-neglected security needs of everyday users in the home, company workstation, and SOHO (small office/home office) categories, with emphasis on system hardening, eliminating malware, user and Internet privacy, encryption, and data hygiene.

The book offers comprehensive tutorials for protecting privacy, preventing system attacks and, most important, avoiding difficulties from buggy programs and software laced with hidden functions and networking capabilities.

Furthermore, the book is packed with information about open-source products with related security strategies for Windows users. One recurrent strategy: replacing insecure closed-source applications and utilities with safer open-source alternatives, thereby eliminating numerous routes to system exploitation and privacy invasion.

Also included is plenty of guidance for Linux users, and a full chapter weighing the advantages and disadvantages of migrating to Linux—a step that can greatly simplify computer security, even for the novice user.

Editorial Reviews

Internet Bookwatch
"Every personal, professional, corporate, and community library system should have on hand a reference copy of Thomas Greene's Computer Security for the Home and Small Office."
July 2004
Slashdot
“This book will tell professionals what they need to do, and novices everything that professionals ought to know, but probably don't."
August 11, 2004
Slashdot.org
Exceptionally well written for a tech manual. The author is a good writer and his prose flows nicely. ... You can make your computer, or your network, very hard to attack, whether you use Windows or Linux. This book will show you how in excellent detail.
From the Publisher

From the reviews:

"Thomas Greene provides the home and SOHO user, and the work-at-home corporate user, a thorough, realistic assessment of the security and privacy risks they face, to instruct them in making their machines and networks unattractive targets for attack and to limit the damage an intrusion or other security snafu can cause. It is a general security and privacy handbook primarily for Window users, but ... accommodates Linux users with occasional boxed tips and sidebars." (it-expert, Issue no. 48, 2004)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590593165
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
03/10/2004
Edition description:
1st ed. 2004. Corr. 2nd printing 2004
Pages:
406
Product dimensions:
7.52(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.28(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Thomas C. Greene is associate editor of The Register, the leading independent IT news daily, where he has been a senior editor and columnist for 5 years. Tom covers cybercrime, computer and network security, and Washington politics and legislation related to information technology.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Computer Security for the Home and Small Office 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Greene devotes his attention to those of you who are not full time computer professionals, and who lack a corporate IT staff to do the dirty work for you. He supposes that it is just you, and possibly your family, with your own machines. These days, for your context, he focuses on computers with a Microsoft or linux operating systems. Sadly, he gives little mention to Apple, though this has a devoted but small following. He does not just discuss strict technical issues about, say, choosing the right secure settings for OpenSSH. If you don't know what that means, don't worry. In fact, it might mean that you could use this book. Greene also goes into extended discussions of issues with some security aspects, but are not solely that. Like the merits of linux versus Microsoft. An entire chapter is devoted to this crucial topic. In this sense, the book's title is overly narrow. What he offers is a good discussion of topics you need to be aware of with your machine. And he can certainly write fluently. This is not a hardcore technical book, with arcane commands and intricate procedures. Most of the book is straight prose that flows. There is a relative dearth of figures. Correctly so. The topics are often not tied to specific applications, where you might need diagrams to show how to go from one screen to another. Which means there is actually another source of readers for this book. If you are well educated, but just not in computing. For whatever reason, you want a lucid, nontechnical explanation of important computer issues faced by many people. So perhaps consider this book?