Computers in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook / Edition 1

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Overview

Computers in the Composition Classroom introduces new teachers and scholars to the best thinking and practices that inform sound computer-assisted writing pedagogy. Chapters focus on critical issues such as literacy and access; identity and online writing practices; composing online; and the future of technology and writing.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312458447
  • Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
  • Publication date: 3/23/2007
  • Series: Bedford/St. Martin's Professional Resources Series
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 544
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

INTRODUCTION
Reflecting on Technology and Literacy in the Composition Classroom

Part One
FOUNDATIONS OF COMPUTERS AND COMPOSITION


Introduction

1 CCCC Position Statement on Teaching, Learning, and Assessing Writing in Digital Environments

2 Literacy, Technology, and Monopoly Capital
RICHARD OHMANN

3 The Rhetoric of Technology and the Electronic Writing Class
GAIL E. HAWISHER AND CYNTHIA L. SELFE

4 Distant Voices: Teaching and Writing in a Culture of Technology
CHRIS M. ANSON

5 The Politics of the Interface: Power and Its Exercise in Electronic Contact Zones
CYNTHIA L. SELFE AND RICHARD J. SELFE JR.

Part Two
LITERACY AND ACCESS

Introduction

6 Technology and Literacy: A Story about the Perils of Not Paying Attention
CYNTHIA L. SELFE

7 From Pencils to Pixels: The Stages of Literacy Technologies
DENNIS BARON

8 Champing at the Bits: Computers, Copyright, and the Composition Classroom
JOHN LOGIE

9 "It wasn't me, was it?" Plagiarism and the Web
DÀNIELLE DEVOSS AND ANNETTE C. ROSATI

10 Reading Hypertext: Order and Coherence in a New Medium
JOHN M. SLATIN

Part Three
WRITERS AND IDENTITY

Introduction

11 Feminist Research in Computers and Composition
LISA GERRARD

12 Out of the Closet and into the Network: Sexual Orientation and the Computerized Classroom
JONATHAN ALEXANDER

13 The Persistence of Difference in Networked Classrooms: Non-negotiable Difference and the African American Student Body
TODD TAYLOR

14 Reversing Notions of Disability and Accommodation: Embracing Universal Design in Writing Pedagogy and Web Space
PATRICIA A. DUNN AND KATHLEEN DUNN DE MERS

Part Four
WRITERS AND COMPOSING

Introduction

15 Pedagogy in the Computer-networked Classroom
JANET M. ELDRED

16 Contrasts: Teaching and Learning about Writing in Traditional and Computer Classrooms
MIKE PALMQUIST, KATE KIEFER, JAMES HARTVIGSEN, AND BARBARA GOODLEW

17 Rethinking Validity and Reliability in the Age of Convergence
DIANE PENROD

18 Looking for Sources of Coherence in a Fragmented World: Notes toward a New Assessment Design
KATHLEEN BLAKE YANCEY

19 The Politics of the Program: MS Word as the Invisible Grammarian
TIM MCGEE AND PATRICIA ERICSSON

20 The Computer and the Inexperienced Writer
CHRISTINE A. HULT

21 Web Literacy: Challenges and Opportunities for Research in a New Medium
MADELEINE SORAPURE, PAMELA INGLESBY, AND GEORGE YATCHISIN

22 Web Research and Genres in Online Databases: When the Glossy Page Disappears
MICHELLE SIDLER


Part Five
INSTITUTIONAL PROGRAMS


Introduction

23 The Debate about Online Learning: Key Issues for Writing Teachers
PATRICIAWEBB PETERSON

24 Why OWLs? Value, Risk, and Evolution
STUART BLYTHE

25 The Best of Both Worlds: Teaching Basic Writers in Class and Online
LINDA STINE

26 The Impact of the Computer in Second Language Writing
MARTHA C. PENNINGTON

27 WAC Wired: Electronic Communication across the Curriculum
DONNA REISS AND ART YOUNG

Part Six
THE RHETORIC OF NEW MEDIA WRITING


Introduction

28 Negative Spaces: From Production to Connection in Composition
JOHNDAN JOHNSON-EILOLA

29 Part 2: Toward an Integrated Composition Pedagogy in Hypertext
SEAN D. WILLIAMS

30 Some Notes on Simulacra Machines, Flash in First-Year Composition, and Tactics in Spaces of Interruption
ANTHONY ELLERTSON

31 Re: The Future of Computers and Writing: A Multivocal Textumentary
BILL HART-DAVIDSON AND STEVEN D. KRAUSE

SUGGESTED READINGS

ABOUT THE EDITORS

CREDITS

INDEX

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    chapters 1, 13, and 21

    Chapter 1 discusses the position statement on teaching, learning, and assessing writing in digital writing from the CCCC. It has many effective tips for students, teachers, and administration in order to provide success for everyone involved. It also discusses how to incorporate principles of best practice in teaching and learning such as, using active learning techniques, giving prompt feedback, and communicating high expectations. It also portrays the advantages of teaching and taking a composition class in a computer oriented environment. Overall very effective tips.
    Chapter 13 discusses the differences that will be faced in networked classrooms. It portrays the steps that should be taken to ensure that African American students are treated equally with all other students and that teachers should not judge that they may not have as much computer and internet capabilities as other students. Also, teachers must take notice in student's body language in order to receive feedback that may otherwise not be stated. At the end of the chapter three different students are described in order to show the reader that not all African American students are the same.
    Chapter 21 discusses the importance of using the internet as a research tool. It goes into lengthy detail of the importance of teachers teaching the students how to find credible resources on the web. It is important to do so because the internet is so vast that students can find tons of useful information that may not be found elsewhere. I believe it is crucial for students to know how and why they need to check a site's reliability before using the internet as a research tool. It also goes into discussion of the advantages of using web resources of library resources.

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  • Posted November 2, 2009

    Book Review

    This was a great book for the modern teacher or aspiring teacher! It covers the major pros and cons to incorporating computers in the classroom. If you are considering teaching an on-line course, there are several chapters that go over common issues instructors have as well as tips on how to give your course a "classroom feel." There are a few chapters that are a bit outdated as classroom technology is forever changing, however, the book focuses primarily on ethics and learning styles rather than the technical aspect. Overall, this book is extremely beneficial and a fairly quick and easy read!

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  • Posted November 2, 2009

    Book Review

    I only had the chance to read chapter 6,7, and 8. Chapter 6 focuses on technology in the class rooms, either using or not using it. We allow ourselves to ignore technology because we feel as though it is not necessary for the classroom. The focus is on the student rather than technology. The author of the chapter finds it necessary to incorporate technology into the classroom because in today's society the internet is a major source in our every day lives. This also comments oh how computers are distributed by race and economic status. Poor people are left out of the loop due to their lack of technological skills.
    Chapter 7 is titled From Pencils to Pixels. In this chapter it takes you through how new technologies like pencils, writing, and technology start off with everyone feeling apprehensive about them due to the fact that they are new things never used before. Over time we adapt to new things.
    The final chapter 8 deals with copyrights and how copyright laws were always changing due to new innovations.

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  • Posted November 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Good advice

    I found chapter 15: Pedagogy in the Computer-networked Classroom to be helpful. In order to teach or learn in this type of setting, one must be flexible, open to changing their learning or teaching styles, and to not focus on the programs too much. Email, file-sharing, bulletin boards, and electronic conferencing can be wonderful additions to the classroom if they are used. The teacher must find ways for these tools to be interactive by guiding and moderating the discussions, peer editing, etc in such a way the engages the classroom community. If not used in an interactive way, the computer becomes nothing more than an expensive typewriter.

    Chapter 16: Contrasts: Teaching and Learning about Writing in Traditional Computer Classrooms was interesting while ringing true at the same time. They compared teaching styles of teachers with varying years of experience and how their teaching styles changed, if at all, when changing from a traditional classroom to the computer based classroom and back again. They found that teachers with less experience tend to embrace the computer much more than teachers who had taught in the traditional classroom for many years. The less experienced teachers were also much more likely to take some of what worked well in the computer based classroom to their traditional room. They also found that students at first found the computer based class to be liberating in a way, because they felt more comfortable sharing their thoughts with others than in a face-to-face setting, but over time student's true personalities tend to come out in their electronic communication. For example, a shy student may start the semester by being more open in group discussions, but over time they would revert back to quietly reading and taking in what others had to say.

    Chapter 31: The Future of Computers and Writing: A Multivocal Textumentary was a little disappointing. I went into this chapter hoping to hear what the professionals believed to the future of electronic writing. Instead I found that most believed that writing, which had been separated in the past from oral and visual art forms, is now being rejoined due to hyperlinks, video, ppt, youtube, digital music, etc. It is true that we are now able to better communicate our message with words, by adding a short video or color to the presentation, as well as a musical background that sets the tone. I agree with the thoughts of these short essays, but I was still left wondering what the future will hold.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    More questions, less answers

    The main goal of the article "Feminist Research in Computers and Composition", is to establish the reasons why women are unable to excel in the world of computers. This is because the computer world is extensively masculine in its origin(having to do with war), its use (higher level business) and how it is introduced to the general public( with video games for little boys and forums directed toward adult men. Within the exploration of these topics, the author chooses to ask questions then enter into a display of data and research. There is little to conclude after having read this article, but many questions that are leaning towards women and their up and coming ability to use a computer. Overall, this article is helpful if you need research (which is dated) and want to form your own argument about computers as they relate to feminism and the classroom.

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  • Posted October 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Chapters 9, 12, and 14 reviewed.

    Ch.9

    I really enjoyed this chapter. Everything mentioned made sense ,and I think the author really touched on how individuals write good and bad. Some people plagairize by accident and on purpose. This chapter also gave suggestions for how to deter individuals away from plagairizing.

    Ch. 12

    I really didn't care for this chapter I think exploring sexual orientation is a good thing however, in a classroom setting I don't agree.

    Ch.14

    This chapter was really interesting i enjoyed reading about the topic of universal design and i think its a great thing. Everybody should be able to use something and understand what they are doing. A good point is stair ramps and larger restroom stalls are there for individuals with children or handicaps ,but others take advantage of these benefits everyday.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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