Con Respeto: Bridging the Distances Between Culturally Diverse Families and Schools: An Ethnographic Portrait / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$5.59
(Save 79%)
Est. Return Date: 10/20/2014
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$16.97
(Save 37%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $7.79
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 71%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (20) from $7.79   
  • New (5) from $20.21   
  • Used (15) from $7.79   

More About This Textbook

Overview

Con Respeto: Bridging the Distances Between Culturally Diverse Families and Schools - An Ethnographic Portrait presents a study of ten Mexican immigrant families, with a special focus on mothers, that describes how such families go about the business of surviving and learning to succeed in a new world. Guadalupe Valdes examines what appears to be a lack of interest in education by Mexican parents and shows, through extensive quotations and numerous anecdotes, that these families are both rich and strong in family values, and that they bring with them clear views of what constitutes success and failure. The book's conclusion questions the merit of typical family intervention programs designed to promote school success and suggests that these interventions - because they do not genuinely respect the values of diverse families - may have long-term negative consequences for children. Con Respeto will be a valuable resource in graduate courses in foundations, ethnographic research, sociology and anthropology of education, multicultural education, and child development; and will be of particular interest to professors and researchers of multicultural education, bilingual education, ethnographic research methods, and sociology and anthropology of education.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807735268
  • Publisher: Teachers College Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/2003
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 390,772
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 11, 2009

    Valdes gives insight to immigrant culture at price of some bias

    This book was assigned reading for a university course in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). It accomplished the goal of providing insight to the situation and culture of recent immigrants, albeit immigrants living close to the Mexican border. Fortunately, the professor encouraged us to consider the differences with recent immigrants living 1500 mile from the border. My major criticism is that the author was dismissive of other theories without building a case. From her standpoint as a Mexican-American, the genetic argument theory is patently wrong and hurtful, but a couple of paragraphs about why people once subscribed to it would contribute to the intellectual status of the book. Same thing for the cultural argument, which still has some good-faith supporters.

    The book is also getting a little dated. I wonder if the bureaucracy is so bad 19 years after it was written. There is no reference to the growing importance of Latin immigrants to the economy of the non-border states both as willing workers and participants in the American dream.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2004

    Buenísimo

    This book provides many insights regarding not only the diversity within Mexican-American culture, acculturation processes, language and education, education policy, bilingualism... but also connects these issues to pre-immigration issues, such as the Mexican education system, variability within Mexican culture, etc. Anyone working with Mexican-American children (whether first, second or third generation...) MUST read this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)