Concepts, Techniques, and Models of Computer Programming / Edition 1

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Overview

This innovative text presents computer programming as a unified discipline in a way that is both practical and scientifically sound. The book focuses on techniques of lasting value and explains them precisely in terms of a simple abstract machine. The book presents all major programming paradigms in a uniform framework that shows their deep relationships and how and where to use them together. After an introduction to programming concepts, the book presents both well-known and lesser-known computation models ("programming paradigms"). Each model has its own set of techniques and each is included on the basis of its usefulness in practice. The general models include declarative programming, declarative concurrency, message-passing concurrency, explicit state, object-oriented programming, shared-state concurrency, and relational programming.

Specialized models include graphical user interface programming, distributed programming, and constraint programming. Each model is based on its kernel language — a simple core language that consists of a small number of programmer- significant elements. The kernel languages are introduced progressively, adding concepts one by one, thus showing the deep relationships between different models. The kernel languages are defined precisely in terms of a simple abstract machine. Because a wide variety of languages and programming paradigms can be modeled by a small set of closely related kernel languages, this approach allows programmer and student to grasp the underlying unity of programming. The book has many program fragments and exercises, all of which can be run on theMozart Programming System, an Open Source software package that features an interactive incremental development environment.

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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
"This book follows in the fine tradition of Abelson/Sussman and Kamin's book on interpreters, but goes well beyond them, covering functional and Smalltalk-like languages as well as more advanced concepts in concurrent programming, distributed programming, and some of the finer points of C++ and Java."—Peter Norvig, Google Inc.

"In almost 20 years since Abelson and Sussman revolutionized the teaching of computer science with their Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, this is the first book I've seen that focuses on big ideas and multiple paradigms, as SICPdoes, but chooses a very different core model (declarative programming). I wouldn't have made all the choices Van Roy and Haridi have made, but I learned a lot from reading this book, and I hope it gets a wide audience." — Brian Harvey , Lecturer, Computer Science Division,University of California, Berkeley

"This is a fascinating book. It's been almost 20 years since Abelson and Sussman revolutionized the teaching of computer science with their _Structure and Interpretation of ComputerPrograms_. In all that time, there have been several books (some of them quite good) followingSICP's ideas pretty closely, and of course many books following the old pedagogy in which the details of aprogramming language are the focus, with few deep ideas. But this is the first book I've seen that focuses on big ideas and multiple paradigms, as _SICP_ does, but chooses a very different core model (declarative programming) — the first real intellectual competition to Abelson andSussman. I wouldn't have made all the choices Van Roy and Haridi have made, but I learned a lot from reading this book, and I hope it gets a wide audience."—Brian Harvey, Lecturer, Computer ScienceDivision, University of California, BerkeleyPlease note: This is the full endorsement text, to be used if possible in publicity and promotional materials. For the book cover, and in places where a shorter version is needed, please use the following: "In almost 20 years since Abelson and Sussman revolutionized the teaching of computer science with their _Structure and Interpretation of ComputerPrograms_, this is the first book I've seen that focuses on big ideas and multiple paradigms, as_SICP_ does, but chooses a very different core model (declarative programming). I wouldn't have made all the choices Van Roy and Haridi have made, but I learned a lot from reading this book, and I hope it gets a wide audience."

Peter Norvig
This book follows in the fine tradition of Abelson/Sussman and Kamin's book on interpreters, but goes well beyond them, covering functional and Smalltalk-like languages as well as more advanced concepts in concurrent programming, distributed programming, and some of the finer points of C++ and Java.
Brian Harvey
In almost 20 years since Abelson and Sussman revolutionized the teaching of computer science with their Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, this is the first book I've seen that focuses on big ideas and multiple paradigms, as SICPdoes, but chooses a very different core model (declarative programming). I wouldn't have made all the choices Van Roy and Haridi have made, but I learned a lot from reading this book, and I hope it gets a wide audience.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262220699
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 3/1/2004
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 936
  • Sales rank: 289,680
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Van Roy is Professor in the Department of Computing Science and Engineering atUniversité catholique de Louvain, at Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.

Seif Haridi is Professor of Computer Systems in the Department of Microelectronics andInformation Technology at the Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, and Chief Scientific Advisor of the Swedish Institute of Computer Science.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Running the Example Programs
1 Introduction to Programming Concepts 1
I General Computation Models 27
2 Declarative Computation Model 29
3 Declarative Programming Techniques 111
4 Declarative Concurrency 233
5 Message-Passing Concurrency 345
6 Explicit State 405
7 Object-Oriented Programming 489
8 Shared-State Concurrency 569
9 Relational Programming 621
II Specialized Computation Models 677
10 Graphical User Interface Programming 679
11 Distributed Programming 707
12 Constraint Programming 749
III Semantics 777
13 Language Semantics 779
IV Appendixes 813
A Mozart System Development Environment 815
B Basic Data Types 819
C Language Syntax 833
D General Computation Model 843
References 853
Index 863
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