Conceptual Coordination: How the Mind Orders Experience in Time [NOOK Book]

Overview

This book bridges the gap between models of human behavior that are based on cognitive task analysis and those based on neural networks. The author argues that these approaches are incomplete and not properly related to each other. His synthesis reconciles the very different conceptualizations of human memory assumed by these two approaches by assuming that 'what the brain remembers' is not a collection of symbols or neurons or even networks of either of these, but rather how to coordinate behavior in time, ...
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Conceptual Coordination: How the Mind Orders Experience in Time

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Overview

This book bridges the gap between models of human behavior that are based on cognitive task analysis and those based on neural networks. The author argues that these approaches are incomplete and not properly related to each other. His synthesis reconciles the very different conceptualizations of human memory assumed by these two approaches by assuming that 'what the brain remembers' is not a collection of symbols or neurons or even networks of either of these, but rather how to coordinate behavior in time, relating different modalities of conception and movement. A second premise is that behavior sequences are categorized, with perceptual categorizations (sounds, images) comprising the first order of categorization and conceptual categorizations of perceptions and actions in time comprising the second order. The conceptual categorizations are themselves sequenced and categorized, corresponding to the familiar classification hierarchies in cognitive models.

Inspired by Bartlett's work, the author seeks to develop a theory of "process memory"--memory for experience in time. Following the methodology of situated cognition, he finds clues in the particulars of human activity, such as typing errors, how a computer interface is used, how a child learns to play in a swimming pool, odd limitations in language comprehension, and so on. Throughout, he examines existing (and often famous) cognitive and neural models with respect to these phenomena. In each case, he attempts to show that the experienced behavior can be understood as sequences of categories being reactivated, substituted, and composed. Ultimately, this analysis is shown to be the link that may lead to improvement of both symbolic and neurally based models of memory and behavior, with concomitant implications for cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, and cognitive science as a whole.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Clancey, who works with the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition at the University of West Florida as well as for NASA's Ames Research Center, explores the ways that computational methods and the human brain work differently. He argues that human behavior models are incomplete, and that the brain actually remembers, not symbols, but how to coordinate behavior in time. He uses this theory, often contrasting it with the popular models using his own examples, such as how children learn to play in water, to examine what human process memory can do and suggests ways for building a machine that has the same capability. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781135672577
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 8/1/1999
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 424
  • File size: 3 MB

Table of Contents

Preface
Pt. I Computational Models of Process Memory
1 Introduction: The Temporal Relations of Conceptualization 1
2 Computational Memory Architectures 35
3 Neural Architectures for Categorization and Sequential Learning 71
Pt. II Serial Learning as Physical Coordination
4 Coupled Perceptual-Motor Conception 97
5 Extending a Felt Path 113
6 Slips And Composed Parallel Binding 141
7 The Paintbrush Inventors: Analogy and Theorizing 169
Pt. III Speaking as Creating Knowledge
8 Bartlett's Reconstructive Memory 201
9 Transformational Processes, Grammars, and Self-Organizing Strings 223
10 Comprehension Difficulties Related to "Interference in Short-Term Memory" 241
11 Stored Descriptive-Schemas Revisited 277
12 Problem-Space Models Revisited 297
13 Conclusions: The Nature and Role of Consciousness 333
References 363
Author Index 383
Subject Index 389
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