A Concise Introduction to Linguistics / Edition 3

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Overview

This student-friendly and well-balanced overview of the field of introductory linguistics pays special attention to linguistic anthropology and reveals the main contributions of linguistics to the study of human communication and how issues of culture are relevant. Its workbook format contains well-constructed exercises in every chapter that allow students to practice key concepts.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205051816
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 1/20/2011
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 158,943
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

In This Section:

I. Author Bio

II. Author Letter

I. Author Bio

Bruce M. Rowe is a professor of anthropology at Los Angeles Pierce College, where he has taught since 1970. He designed the college’s first linguistics course for students majoring or minoring in linguistics, anthropology, education, English, Interpreting for the Deaf, and communications studies, and for those fulfilling a general education requirement. Professor Rowe also teaches physical and cultural anthropology as well as sociology. In addition to A Concise Introduction to Linguistics, he has co-authored ten editions of Physical Anthropology, two editions of Physical Anthropology: The Core, and physical anthropology study guides and workbooks (all with Philip L. Stein). Professor Rowe has authored four editions of The College Survival Guide: Hints and References to Aid College Students and The College Awareness Guide: What Students Need to Know to Succeed in College. He has received numerous awards for teaching. He is a fellow of the American Anthropological Association and a member of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists and the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges.

Diane P. Levine is a professor of anthropology at Los Angeles Pierce College, where she teaches cultural and physical anthropology, as well as linguistics. She is the chair of the Department of Anthropological and Geographical Sciences As a former teacher of English and ESL, she has written articles on the use of literature in the ESL classroom and presented seminars on critical thinking in the language arts classroom. Professor Levine is on the advisory boards for Annual Editions: Anthropology and is also a national advisor for the film series Cultural Anthropology: Our Diverse World. She is a member of the American Anthropological Association and the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges.

I. Author Letter

Dear Colleague,

Linguistics courses are taught in several academic departments, including linguistics, English, and anthropology. In addition, students with majors other than linguistics, English, and anthropology might be required to take an introductory course in linguistics; these include communications, education, journalism, sociology, and deaf studies. Most linguistics books on the market are directed specifically to linguistics, English, or anthropology majors.

We have attempted to write an introductory text that covers the core topics of linguistics and provides the information and concepts that will allow students to understand more detailed and advanced treatments of linguistics, should they pursue the field further. In other words, our book is written with the general education student in mind, but it also provides the linguistics, English, and anthropology major with the resources needed to succeed in the next level of courses.

We have written this book in a manner that does not assume previous knowledge of linguistics on the part of the student. We explain all concepts in a systematic way assisted by numerous pedagogical aids. We attempt to make complex linguistic topics as easy to learn as possible. For students, we have included introductory questions, numerous exercises and study questions, chapter summaries, cross-cultural examples, and there is an online learning center with numerous features. For instructors we have expanded the test bank to include over 1200 questions and provided teaching suggestions and a list of websites of potential interest to people teaching a linguistics course.

We recently received a letter from a professor that we would like to share with you:

"I am writing to tell you how glad I am to have found the textbook that you co-authored. After searching for an introductory linguistics text that did not send students away from class, I finally found one, yours. I am mostly a Spanish instructor, but since my major was Spanish Linguistics, I also teach the Language and Culture course at my college and have struggled to find a level-appropriate text. Most texts were either too oriented toward theoretical linguistics or completely skewed towards anthropology. Yours is the perfect blend, suitable for either a straight introductory linguistics course or a linguistic anthropology course. I am particularly pleased by the ordering of phonetics, then phonology, then morphology; several texts I have looked at start with either morphology or pragmatics and discourse analysis. I was also pleased to see an entire chapter devoted to Sign Language. And students will be delighted that the text book was available online for under $50 (the one I had been using was $120 new!)." (Jeanne Egasse, Irvine Valley College, 4/8/2011)

We would be happy to hear from anyone using our book or considering it for use in a linguistics or language and culture class. Our emails are: rowebm@piercecollege.edu and levinedp@piercecollege.edu

Sincerely,

Bruce M. Rowe & Diane P. Levine

Pierce College

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 The Nature of Communication

The Nature of Communication

Nonhuman and Human Communication Compared

Chimpanzees and Gorillas in Controlled Environments

Skepticism over Ape Language Studies

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

End of Chapter Questions

Chapter 2 The Phonological Component: Phonetics

Articulatory Phonetics

Consonants and Vowels

Syllables and Syllabic Consonants

Suprasegmentals

Connected Speech

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

End of Chapter Exercises

Chapter 3 The Phonological Component: Phonology

The Phoneme and the Concept of Significant Differences in Sounds

Distinctive Feature Analysis

Phonological Processes

The Continuous and Complex Nature of Speech, Revised

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

End of Chapter Exercises

Chapter 4 The Morphological Component

The Morpheme

Morphological Typology

How New Words Are Formed

Lexical Categories

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

End of Chapter Exercises

Chapter 5 Syntax

Syntactic Construction

Grammaticality Judgments and Ambiguity

The Constituent Structure of Sentences

Phrase Structure Rules

Transformational Rules

Optional and Obligatory Transformations

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

Chapter 6 Semantics and Pragmatics

The Meaning of Words: Lexical Semantics

The -Nyms

Other Kinds of Meaning: Structural Semantics

Pragmatics

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

Fieldwork Project

Chapter 7 Sociolinguistics and Linguistic Anthropology

Regional Dialects

African American English

Hispanic English

Contact Languages: Pidgins and Creoles

Situational Dialects or Registers

Gender and Language

Linguistic Anthropology

Language and Nationalism

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

Chapter 8 Language Acquisition

Language and the Brain

Ideas about Language Acquisition

How Do Children Acquire the Components of Language?

Language Socialization: Three Examples

The Acquisition of Sign Language

Bilingualism

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

Chapter 9 Sign Language

The Nature of Sign Language

What Is ASL?

Nicaraguan Sign Language: The Birth of a New Language

Social Dimensions of Sign Language

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

End of Chapter Exercises

Chapter 10 Writing Systems

Writing Is Secondary to Speech and Sign Language

Types of Writing Systems

The History of Writing

The Printing Press

A Few Words about Computers

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

End of Chapter Exercises

Chapter 11 Nonverbal Communication

What Does “Nonverbal” Mean?

Kinesic Behavior

Affect Displays

The Eyes Have It

Physical Appearance

Touching (Tactile) Behavior

Paralanguage

Proxemics

The Physical Environment

“How-To” Books: A Word of Caution

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

End of Chapter Exercises

Chapter 12 Historical Linguistics

The Relationships between Languages

Types of Language Change

How Long Does It Take a Language to Change?

Disappearing, Reappearing, and Emerging Languages

The Spread of Englishes

New Jargons

Summary

Suggested Reading

Suggested Websites

Review of Terms and Concepts

Appendix A: Answers to Reviews of Terms and Concepts

Appendix B: Answers to Selected Exercises

Appendix C: Fieldwork Exercises

Glossary

Index

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