The Concrete Grove

The Concrete Grove

3.6 3
by Gary McMahon
     
 

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Imagine a place where all your nightmares become real. Think of dark urban streets where crime, debt and violence are not the only things to fear. Picture an estate that is a gateway to somewhere else, a realm where ghosts and monsters stir hungrily in the shadows. Welcome to the Concrete Grove. It knows where you live.

Imagine a place where all your nightmares

Overview

Imagine a place where all your nightmares become real. Think of dark urban streets where crime, debt and violence are not the only things to fear. Picture an estate that is a gateway to somewhere else, a realm where ghosts and monsters stir hungrily in the shadows. Welcome to the Concrete Grove. It knows where you live.

Imagine a place where all your nightmares become real.
Think of dark urban streets where crime, debt and violence are not the only things to fear.
Picture an estate that is a gateway to somewhere else, a realm where ghosts and monsters stir hungrily in the shadows.
Welcome to the Concrete Grove.
It knows where you live.
Book One of The Concrete Grove trilogy.

Gary McMahon’s chilling horror trilogy shows us a Britain many of us will recognise, while whispering of the terrible and arcane presences clawing against the boundaries of our reality!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781907519956
Publisher:
Rebellion
Publication date:
06/28/2011
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
867,887
Product dimensions:
4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 1.20(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Gary McMahon’s fiction has appeared in magazines and anthologies in the UK and US and has been reprinted in both The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror and The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror. He is the British-Fantasy-Award-nominated author of Rough Cut, All Your Gods Are Dead, Dirty Prayers, How to Make Monsters, Rain Dogs, Different Skins, Pieces of Midnight, The Harm, Hungry Hearts, and has edited an anthology of original novelettes titled We Fade to Grey.

His most recent novel is Pretty Little Dead Things from Angry Robot Books.

Author website: www.garymcmahon.com

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The Concrete Grove 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Urthwild More than 1 year ago
Out of sheer respect for the art of writing and the author I always start by reading trilogies at book 1, which henceforth shall be known as the beginning; I am the same with films, but curiously not with episodic television programs. I see only confusion in starting to read a series of books at book 2. So here we are reviewing book 1 of the Concrete Grove Trilogy, and I find myself standing in a cloakroom looking out of a window on the 6th floor of the building I happened to work in looking directly at the same concrete tower block. Well, obviously it is not the very same tower, we are not in the Northeast of England for a start, but the sinister proportions, the architecture, the bleakness of it is all there and so thankfully, we are several miles away from the building because you see I am convinced it is watching me, following my every move. Having lived for 10 months on a similar estate decades ago I felt an instant connection here with a Gary McMahon's description of the grove estate, the people. It resonates, it is very well done. The type of estate portrayed in the book must exist in every city in the western world, are people in fact drawn to these bleak run down council estates (public housing) because they feel that they deserve to only inhibit the very fringes of society, (they are not even always the cheapest accommodation), or is it a deliberate policy by the authorities to house every city's human detritus together with the people failed by society, the people whose hope and dreams have been snatched away and then deny them the means to climb out. Gary McMahon is a good writer and 'The Concrete Grove' is a readable book, but having read all 3 books I can safely say this was not the best of the three. I felt there was something missing from the end and not just because I did not like what became of one of the main characters. You are asked to invest time and emotion into 3 characters in particular, two of whom reappear later in the trilogy, one makes a small but ultimately insignificant reappearance in book 3, and the other makes a larger but ultimately unsatisfactory return in book 2. Why didn't they have more to do? The story indicates that a side character feels as if they may have a significant job to do other than to bring pain, misery and despair, and they do indeed take part in at least one repugnant act, but thinking about redemption is not the same as doing something redeeming. In the end this character's demise is a thing of pure dark, beautiful fantasy, but they are never really alluded to again either in this book or the rest of the series, so the demise becomes pointless. I found the pacing and the language did not match what was actually happening in quite a few parts, I felt I could have been running on a treadmill to keep up, but then I still would not have actually gone anywhere. Of course, this does refer to the whole book at all. The fantastical language used in certain scenes makes very little reappearance in books 2 and 3 and when it does reappear, it is always in the appropriate places. In this book it jars slightly. Overall, this is an interesting read and I would still recommend it as long as you intend to read the whole trilogy. Urthwild
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago