Confederacy of the Dead

Confederacy of the Dead

3.5 2
by Richard Gilliam, Edward E. Kramer, Martin H. Greenberg
     
 
No other war has captured the hearts, minds and imaginations of Americans in the way the Civil War has. Now these 25 tales bring to life that troubled time when brave soldiers would heed the call to battle--even from beyond the grave. Includes a rare short story by Anne McCaffrey and four pieces that were nominated for the 1993 Bram Stoker Award.

Overview

No other war has captured the hearts, minds and imaginations of Americans in the way the Civil War has. Now these 25 tales bring to life that troubled time when brave soldiers would heed the call to battle--even from beyond the grave. Includes a rare short story by Anne McCaffrey and four pieces that were nominated for the 1993 Bram Stoker Award.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451454775
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
08/01/1995
Pages:
480
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 5.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Martin H. Greenberg was honored in 1995 by the Mystery Writers of America with the Ellery Queen Award for lifetime achievement in mystery editing. He is also the recipient of two Anthony awards. Mystery Scene magazine called him "the best mystery anthologist since Ellery Queen." He has compiled more than 1,000 anthologies and is the president of TEKNO books. He lives in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

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Confederacy of the Dead 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
R_Hinshaw 29 days ago
Three and a half stars. This collection of horror and fantasy stories connected to the War Between the States was released in 1993. I read it not long after, while I was in college, and recently revisited a few of the stories that made an impression on my memory. The one that stuck with me the most is horrifying in an entirely different and more real way: Nancy A. Collins’ “The Sunday-Go-To-Meeting Jaw”. My favorite of the more conventional horror tales is Doug Murray’s “The Crater”, in which the miners digging tunnels to lay charges under the Confederate fortifications around Petersburg encounter something else underground. Other highlights for me include the entries from William S. Burroughs, Anne McCaffrey, Jerry and Sharon Ahern, Nancy Holder, and the collaboration between Anya Martin and Steve Antczak. Unsurprisingly, most of the stories are set in the South and, especially the ones that tilt towards horror, in the late stages of the war. With so much death and despair everywhere, it should not surprise that a number of the stories involve zombies. Unfortunately, I don’t share most people’s apparent fascination with the undead, so none of these stand out in my memory.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago